(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Zion's landmark [serial]."

PERKINS LIBRARY 

DoLeU niversiry 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/zionslandmarkse4819unse_0 



/ZION'S LANDMARK 

^ 

P U BLISHID SEMI-MONTHLY 
A T 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Primitive or Old School Baptist 

: u 

VOL. XLVIII. WILSON, N. C. NOV 15. 1915: NO. 1. 



id 



P. D. GOLD, Bditor 


Wilson. N. C 


P. Q. LBSTKR, Ajw. Miter 


Floyd, V». 




$1.M PER YIAJL 



SHOW 
CASES 



Direct From The Famous Gurley Show Cases cannot 
Factory be had from any other manufacturer 
In America. 



Our goods received double award at the Jamestown 
Exposition. A jobber who has been selling Gurley 
Show Cases for nine years, says than only one cus- 
tomer has made any complaint of our goods, and 
only one small case was involved in his complaint. 
This is a wonderful record. We sell direct to the 
merchant. Drug store outfits a specialty. For Drug Store outfits ask for 
catalogue 23, for wall or street cases ask for catalogue 24, for our general 
line ask for catalogue 25 HIGH POINT SHOW CASE WORKS, 

High Point, N. C. 




Stops Tobacco Habit. 

Elders' Sanitarium located at 1017 
Main St., St. Joseph, Mo., has publish- 
ed a book showing the deadly effect of 
the tobacco habit, and how it can be 
stopped in three to five days. 

As they are distributing this book 
free, anyone wanting a copy should 
send their name and address at once. 



Safety Razor and 3 Blades $1 




RECIPE FOR GRAY HAIR 



To half pint of water add 1 oz. Bay 
Rum, a small box or Barbo Compound 
and 1-4 oz. of glycerine. Apply to the 
hair twice a week until it becomes 
the desired shade. Any druggist can 
put this up or you can mix it at home 
at very little cost. Full directons 
for making and use come in each box 
of Barbo Compound. It will gradual- 
ly darken streaked, faded gray hair, 
and removes dandruff. It is excellent 
for falling hair and will make harsh 
hair soft and glossy. It will not col- 
or the scalp, is not sticky or greasy, 
and does not rub off. 



Continued from Page 24 — 

5th Sunday in November, 1914. 

Brethren coming by rail will be met 
at Dunn, Friday p. m. Those coming 
on the Durham and Southern will be 
met at Turlington, Friday p. m. All 
lovers of the truth are invited, espec- 
ially ministers. 

ELDER W. G. TURNER, 

Moderator. 

CORNELIUS HODGES, Union Clerk. 



The next Staunton River Union 
Meeting will be held with the church 
at Oak Grove, Campbell County, Va., 
Friday, Saturday and 5th Sunday i.u 
November, 1914. 

Brethren coming by rail will get 
off at Wind Fall Station on the Lynch- 
burg & Durham Railroad 25 miles 
Southeast of Lynchburg. 

ELD. N. T. OAKES. 



BIBLES. 

I have made an arrangement for a 
very nice Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. G. 



LADIES SIOOO REWARD! Int°ee"my y greli 
SU.T. ,sf.,i ••M.-iHWy ' • ."'pound. Safely relieve* some 

••f l.mR.'St, most obstinate, abnormal cases In 3 to 5 

days. No harm, pain or intei rereiK-o with work. Mail 

Dr. J.'R. Soufhineton Remedy Co., 515 Main SI. Kansas City, Mo." 




2- 1 f 

ZIONS LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

feer l*. I). Gold, Wilson N. C. 

Very Dear Bro.: — 1 am handing you 
herewith a good letter I just received 
from Bro. R. L. Dodsoja. 1 don'1 want 
to be selfish, so 1 ask you to read, and 

you can find space in the "Family 
Paper" (Zion's Landmark) please 
publish that others may enjoy it ako. 

Hope you and sister Cold are well. 
Come to see us when you have a mind. 

Yoar little brother, I hope, 

C. B. PI ALL. 

Coldsboro, N. C. 

Dear Bro. Hall: — I am not unmind- 
ful of the debt I owe you. but I am 
and have been cognizant of the fact 
that of myself I am utterly unable to 
speak comfortingly to the sold hun- 
gering for spiritual food. Poor, help- 
less mortals, like you and I, are with- 
out 'power to control the spirit ; we 
can do nothing but abide the appoint- 
ed time of our Lord, and he comes as 
a thief in the night, unexpectedly, 
therefore we are commanded to be not 
as the foolish virgins, but as the wise, 
that we may have our lights burning 
and ready for the bridegroom when 
he comes. I am afraid that my light 
is kept beneath the bushel the greater 
part of the time ; indeed, much of the 
time there seems to be 1 no light, and 
"How tedious and tiresome the hours, 
when Jesus no longer I see." But 



when the Sun of Righteousness rises 
with healing in his wings, His presence 
dispenses my gloom and December is 
as pleasant as ]\Iay. 

We had a good meeting Sunday and 
after preaching T was asked to talk. 
For several days previous the case of 
Ruth and Naomi had been on my 
mind and I tried to speak to the breth- 
ren and sisters of the things I saw 
there, but il sekkii I always leave out 
the best part, and as this portion of 
scripture slid has Some bearing on my 
mind I want to tell you if I can some 
of my thoughts. I hays been a great 
questioner, and among other questions 
which have confronted me is the fol- 
lowing: Why did von ever offer to 
the Old Bapt'ist Church? In thinking 
of the answer Ruth came into my mind 
and here T want to say that there 
seems to me a sense in which Naomi is 
a type of the church. After the death 
of Naomi's husband and two sous in 
the land of Moah she hears that there 
is broad in the land of Jndah, and so 
she kisses Oi'pah and Ruth and bids 
them return each to her mother'' 1 
house. But they follow her saving: 
"Surely we will return with fche'e unto 
thy people: bnt she saysi "Turn again 
ray daughters : why will ye £o with 
me? Are there vet any more sons in 
my womb, that thev may be your hus- 
bands?" And in her reasoning with 
them, she again tells them to trtrn 
hack and go their way, that she is too 



218981 



\ BI0N1 LANDMARK. r-, 



2 

old to have an husband, and to show 
Ihem more conclusively-, as it were, the 
absurdity of their cantiuuing on with 
hor, she tells them, "If J should say 1 
have hope, if 1 should have au husband 
also tonight, and should also bear sons: 
would ye tarry for thorn till they were 
grown? Would ye stay for thetu from 
having husbands? Nay. my daugh- 
ters." 

Naomi had absolutely do induce- 
ml lit or attraction to hold out to them 
Prom a natural or fleshly view point. 
There was no fleshey reason she could 
offer for their clinging to her. In this 
respeel she resembles the old Baptist 
church. Some organizations and or- 
ders afford opportunities for worldly 
advancement either commercially or 
socially, or both, to those who will 
join them and become acquainted and 
ardent workers. 1 once beard a fam- 
ous preaeher endeavor to encourage 
young men to prepare for the minis- 
try, holding out to them as be did. 
thai by such a profession they could 
marry into the best of families and 
thus elevate themselves socially in a 
short while. I am glad, dear brother, 
thai it cannot be truthfully said of the 
Did Baptists that they hold out any 
such reasons as these to enlarge their 
numbers. After Naomi had spoken as 
she did Orpah turns back. How many 
Orpah's are there in the world today, 
and how quickly they turn back when 
there are no loaves and fishes, but T 
rejoice that we have on record the 
ease of Ruth. What a picture is here 
presented. Naomi says to her, "Be- 
hold thy sister-in-law is gone back to 
her people, and unto her gods, (notice 
that they are plural — she has many) 
return thou after thy sister-in-law." 
This must have been a trying hour, 
but, Ruth said, "Entreat me not to 
leave thee, or to return from following 
after thee; for whither thou goest, I 
will go; and where thou lodgest. I will 
loige; thy people shall he my people, 



and thy God, my God." Theee was 
an irresistible drawing in her breast, 
and she felt that, though she persist 
she wanted to remain with Naomi. She 
continues by saying^ "Where thou 
diest, will 1 die, and there will I be 
buried ; I he Lord do so to me, and more 
also if aught hut death part thee and 
me. Has this not been your exper- 
ience, my brother? I believe it is the 
experience of every heaven born soul. 
1 recall when 1 left the missionaries 
that 1 was told there were not manv 
of the Old Baptists and that they 

would soon die out entirely, hut I felt 
that they were my people and 1 re- 
plied thai if 1 had to stand alone it 
would he (in their doctrine. To me 
I hey were and have ever since been 
the lily among thorn., notwithst'and 
ing many of them have wrinkled faces 
and evidences of trials and affliction 
in this world. They are the apple tree 
among the trees of the wood to me. 
the only tree which hears the fruit of 
the spirit. They feel mighty small at, 
times and like Naomi while she return- 
ed to her own country, she said, "Call 
me not Naomi, call me .Mara," which 
means bitter. Yes, they write bitter 
things against themselves and do not 
feel worthy of a name among the 
saints. They have so many failings, 
have come short of the glory of Go.l 
in all things, are ashamed of their 
ways and doings. Like Naomi they 
have gone astray, left their own coun- 
try and gone over in the land of 
Moab. Tn the beginning of the first 
chapter of Ruth though wc are told 
that these things came to pass in the 
days when the judges ruled. Then 
was the time of famine. It seems to 
me that T have known of the days 
when these judges ruled. When old 
Adam asserts himself in the church 
and there are some who try to take 
things in their own hands and lord it 
over God's heritage, it causes a famine 
and severs as it were, if only tempor- 



ZION'i LANDMARK. 



3 



ally, the ties that binds the hearts hi 
Christian love. But at God's appoint- 
ed time and way perilous times fall 
upon them. Naomi loses her husband 
and her iwo sous, and longs to return 
to her Father 's house where there is 
stdl bread, ajiu as she returns, she 
says, "1 went out full, and the Lord 
hath brought nie home again empty." 

Yes, when one feels he can do some- 
thing of himself, that he is better thau 
other men are, tiien is the ti:ne he gets 
into trouble, bui when the Lord brings 
turn home eiuply and gives bun a true 
conception of himself, he must repent 
in dust and ashes and acknowledge 
that he is a worm and no man. 

in closing, let me add, there is an- 
other question which comes up from 
time to time. Ihis question is, "-How 
can the brethren fellowship you'i What 
benefit are you any way to them?" I 
have to confess that they have been 
long suffering and forbearing with my 
imperfections. J do not feel to be 3f 
any benefit to them, and that they 
COUld get along perhaps better with- 
out me than With me, but what would 
become of me? 1 need them. 1 need 
their love and their fellowship. They 
are my people and their God is my 
God, and 1 want to live and die with 
them. 

Deui 1 Brother, I intended to ask 
you all about the good preaching you 
heard at the meetings you attended. 
Several have writtten me that they 
had the pleasure" of meeting you and 
sister Hall at the Upper Country Line 
Association. It would have been an 
unspeakable pleasure for me to have 
been there, but il was not the purpose 
of God that 1 should, ft is my plan 
now to visit thai section of the coun- 
I ry next summer. 

Pardon this long Letter, I felt a de- 
sire to talk with you about Ruth and 
Naomi, but fear you will not. get any- 
thing out of it. 

L«Te t» y*w and sinter ttall from 



me and uiine. 

Yours in hope, 
B. LESTER DODSON. 
New York City. 



A COMFORTING LETTER. 

Deaf Brother Gold :— Enclosed is a 
very comforting letter to me that 1 re- 
ceived from my pastor thai lives next 
door to me. We have rec J.itly beeu 
closed ill (or at least 1 have) on ac- 
count of my son with small-pox;. I will 
not attempt to tell what 1 passed 
through, for I could not. But this 
sweet letter was a source of eomfori 
to me, ami 1 believe the Lord dirt'cted 
him to write. 

Brother Cold. 1 insist on your s1a\ 
iug with us next Friday night. You 
can do as you feel best about it. I 
would lie glad to have you come', but 
if you had rather wait a little longer 
on account of the small-pox why you 
just let in. know. 

We are all well now. no..,- but my 
son had the small-pox. and he is well. 
I also have a son in the hospital with 
typhoid fever, but he is better. 

I would he glad you would publish 
Brother Williford's k'tter if v.,u see 
fit. 

Pray for me. 

Your sister I hope, 

MATTIE JARRELL. 
Rocky .Mount, \. C. 

Dear Sister Jarrell : By some means 
it is on my mind to write you a few 
lines, that is. if I can, say a 'few words 
of encouragemenl to you while you 
are" because of the manner of your 
sou's sickness, deprived of the pres- 
ence of those who I am sure are the 
comforl ;<nd joy of your life here on 
earth. I hope you w ill feel and be 
Uevd thai you have my profound sym- 
pathy in your trials, and my hearts de- 
sire is that our blessed Lord may be 
with you to comfort you, and niory 



U8981 



4 



ZION'i LANDMARK. 



than supply you with every consola- 
tion tliat your brethren and friends 
eouid afford you if we were permitted 
io be with you continually. 

1 hear that you are' absorbed iu 
grief, and if i eould, 1 would freely 
bear it with you if 1 eould afford you 
auy relief. But dear sister, seeing that 
communication between us and you 
are eut asunder by circumstances 
which we have no control of, 1 pray 
(J (id that in His love and pity He' will 
abundantly bless you by His blessed 
presence, and give you faith in Him, 
and in His precious promises that will 
strengthen you both in body and mind 
sufficiently to hear you up under your 
.sore trials and enable you to feel a 
bletesed assurance, sustain you by His 
mighty power, and be merciful to you 
through your troubles and afflictions. 
1 have (jtrong faith and hope that He 
will, for I am sure that you are one 
of His dear children. He loves you as 
such and will at no time forget to be 
gracious &nd merciful to you, for His 
mercy endure'th forever, and He teils 
us so fatherly thai "He will be with 
us in every time of trouble," and dear 
sister, it is not with Him as It is with 
us, for uo law of the land nor any ob- 
stacle of any kind can hinder Him 
from coming in our house nor in our 
hearts and ministering unto us, as 
seems good to Him, and 1 hope that 
you may take 1 comfort that while your 
dear brethren are forbidden by Law 
and fear of contracting disease to 
come to see you, and comforting you 
in your trouble and loneliness, thai 
He'is God of the whole world, arid 
fears nothing and nothing can keep 
him from coming to us, His beloved 
ones: wheresoever they be, or what 
ever their conditions are and doing 
for them far more than we, His chil- 
dren could were Ave with you to serve 
you and do all in our powefr for you. 

Tn conclusion* Sister Jarrcll, 1 will 
sayjthat any thing' or any assistance 1 



can render you at any time 1 will do 
it. belie veing that according to the 
words of our Saviour that it would be 
as doing it unto Him for it would be 
doing unto one of His" little ones. 
Your little brother, I hope, 

M. B. W1LLIF0RD. 



A VOICE IN THE DEEP. 

Miss Elizabeth H. Barbour, 

My 1 )('.,• Friend and Sister in the 
Gospel: - Your letter did me good. It 
was as the voice of one in .the deep 
crying to another in the deep. Deep 
calleth unto deep a1 the' noise of thy 
water-spouts, Oh God! How very im- 
pressive are those words. We know 
them only as we are brought into 
them by actual experience in our own 
Life. 1 1 is thus that the! Lord teaches 
us the tilings which He taught our 
teachers, the Prophets and the Apos- 
tles. Lf it was not a fact that He is 
teaching m it would be impossible for 
us to Learn anything from them. No 
one can learn it but those who know 
it. Also, il is in this teaching in the 1 
deep that we le;\rn obedience and sub- 
mission, or the obedience of submis- 
sion. Our Lord learned obedience by 
the things He suffered. Therefore, it 
is m sufferings that we are brought to 
learn the fellowship of His sufferings 
and become obedient unto death. It 
is in the faith of His resurrection that 
we are enabled to look forward in 
hope of the resurrection of our bod- 
ies. There had to be a death before 
there was a resurrection. 

It is so in our experience as we trav- 
el in our pilgrimage state. We are 
daily dying; dying to self and the 
powers of ourselves and all others to 
do us any good. Thus we are mad.- 
to experience' that vain is the help of 
man. If for a moment we find our- 
selves trusting in ourselves or any 
other man or men we are made to feel 
the curse of such trust. Cursed is th* 



ZION'g LANDMARK. 



5 



mail that trusteth in man or inaketh 
flesh his aria. Oh! the terror of this 
curse ! Thus we die, nevertheless we 
Jive. Christ liveth in us and we live 1 
by Him. 

This daily experience is the ernest 
off that which is to eome, and it keeps 
us in hope, aud that hope is an an- 
chor of the soul both sure and stead- 
fast. Why? Because 1 it (our hope; 
has entered into that within the veil 
whither the forerunner has for us en- 
tered; even Jesus who is our High 
Priest forever. 

Now if He' learned obedience by the 
things which he suffered for us, and 
by his Bufferings was made ui^lo us a 
perfect Saviour, if this lie true, is it 
not also true that in following Him 
we must also suffer with Him? Ami 
then to reign with Him? None can 
reign with Him only as they suffer 
with Him. 

In this teaching we' are kept con- 
j.antly in the hope of the resurreetiou 
of the' body, for after He' had ended all 
His sufferings lie conquered death and 
arose in the body, the same body, with 
the prints of the' nails and the spear. 
He was the first fruits of them that 
slept, therefore, as His body arose 
from the dead, bo shall He quicken our 
mortal bodies at His coming and raise 
them up in His own likeness. Thus 
we shall awake in His likeness and we 
shall I..- satisfied. 

"There is no sorrow there. 
There'll be no suffering there. 
All will he love and sweetness there'. 
For in the likeness of Christ we shall 
appear." 

The Lord abundantly bless you my 
dear friend and give you grace to look 
to Him and to trust Him. 

V'our true friend, 

L. H. HARDY. 

Atlantic, N. C. 



COMMUNICATION. 

.My Dear Aunt Lou:— Mamma sent 
me your good Letter, written her some 
time ago, in which you request me to 
write you and to let you have my let- 
ter published in ilu- Landmark.' My 
dear aunt. 1 fear tiiat nothing 1 could 
write would he worthy a place in that 
good paper, and 1 feel to know that 
unless aided and directed by the spirit 
of divine truth 1 could say nothing 
|that would in any way comfort or 
encourage one of the Lord's little one's. 
Of Course, 1 can do nothing good. .My 
flesh is weak and sinful in the extreme. 
1 often wonder if it is possible that 

any one on earth can he as vile and 
sinful as I feel to know myself to he, 
and while all those I love to think of 
as brothers and sisters in the Lord 
seem alwa.Ns to feel themselves the vil- 
est of sinneis. it dees seem to me that 
not one of them could be so wicked 
ami sinful as I. Again, at times I hope 
1 am thankful that I can, as 1 hop,-, by 
the grace of the Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ see and realize my losl 
ami sinful condition, for I feci to re- 
alize that for such only is there any 
hope. Christ came not to save the 
righteous, but to save poor lost sin- 
ners. What a blessed thought ! That, 
of itself, OUght to he enough to satisfy 
•poOr, lost and undone sinners; hut he 
does not leave 1 us with that one prom- 
ise, hut when it pleases Hie deal' Lord 
lo give us a heart and mind to under 
stand his blessed word, we can fhvl 
rich promise and mercy in every line. 
When he reveals Ids wonderful pres- 
ence in our hearts the pleasures and 
joys of this world fade into insigni- 
ficance. R is my earnest desire, if nol 
deceived; that the Lord in his rich 
mercy and grace would create' within 
me a meek and humble spirit and make 
my will submissive to his in all things 
wha tsoever. 

Aunt Leu, 1 wish you could hav. 



li 



ZlON'i LANDMARK, 



been with us al our good meeting last 
Saturday and Sunday. Whiie tlie 
baptists have always seenie'd to me to 
be iiie happiest little band in the world 
I think 1 never realized such wonder- 
i n I manifestation of love and fellow- 
ship as seemed to flow from heart to 
heart in this meeting. It seemed to 
ine that everything was in perfect har- 
mony, and that surely we must be 
blessed with the presence of the Lord. 
1 have always enjoyed their meetings, 
but oh. what a blessed privilege to be 
counted yne of them and to feel, it nol 
deceived, that you have performed tie- 
duty imposed upon you. On Saturday 
brother ttylton preached with great 
liberty from Isaiah 6:25, and ail 
agreed whtn Brother Mitchell follow- 
ed him, taking up the line of thought 

ing mi in the same tone although by 
the same person, that /the "oxen'' 
surely had the same yoke-master that 
time. 1 never heard two preachers use 
the same text with such wonderful 
pew,.,- as they did that. Wfoal a Cent- J 
lo a starving soul to hear such preach- 
ing as that. What utter folly the 

mo who loves the doctrine of salvation 
by grace through the death and resur- 

Christ. i tried to live upon it for a 
longtime, but 1 was merely kept alive 
by the power of the Lord, not fed and 
nourished by what I heard from the 
pulpit. 

Aunt Lon. 1 would like, if 1 could do 
so aright, lo tell yon something of the 
way I hope the dear Lord has led me, 
but I so fear that if 1 should attempt 
to <h> so thai 1 mighl try to rely upon 
my own strength, and i feel to know 
that it would be no pleasure to you 
if I wrote in that way. 1 scarcely 
know where to begin, for if not de- 
ceived f feel to realize that the' Lord 
has led aie all the days of my life, 
even from my earliest existence down 



to the present time, for, but for his 
kind mercy. 1 could not be here 1 today. 
W hy it has pleased him to preserve 
my worthless body up to this time, 1 
know not; but sometimes, if not de- 
ceived, 1 feel to hope that it is to show 
his power and glory: tor if he has in 
deed manifested in me his love, sure- 
ly it show, his power, for nothiag but 

thin-- of such a vile, sin fid creator* 
as 1 know 1 am. 

Papa and mama always taught us 
to be moral, but we learned at the 
same time. 1 think, that religion was 
a thing apart from man, and while 
they never objected to an} r of us at- 
tending church, (and we had no oppor- 
tunity to attend the Primitive Baptist 
church i »ve were taught that we could 
not get religion of ourselves, that it 
was the gin of God. I always attend 
ed protracted meetings, and while my 
associates would often take part, many 
t imes they said in order to keep the 
meeting going, something always kept 
mi' from accepting any of their hivi 

when I attended a meeting while I 
was teaching at Greefi Sulphur and 
became very much interested in my 
condition, as they called it, They 
would tell me to "come to Christ," to 
"believe on the Lord and he saved,'' 
etc.. hut somehow I could not do so. 
However, in some way, I know not 
how or why. before that meeting closed 
a ureal change of some kind took place 
in me 1 , or at least it seemed so to me. 
My heart seemed to be foil of joy and 
praise lo the Lord, and all 1 wanted to 
do was sing, read my Bible, pray and 
praise the Lord. All that winter this 
continued, some of the happiest mo- 
ments I e%( v spe'nt being at times when 
I was all alone when it seemed my 
heart was jnst running over with 
P raises to God. My greaiest delight 
was in reading the s«N.ptures, and 
they seemed *m plain and baautiful lo 



EION'i LANDMARK \\ 7 



me. Time and time again, perhaps a 
thousand times, 1 have found myself 
when all alone carrying on an argu- 
ment with some imaginary person, ai'- 
guing Old Baptist doctrine and con- 
tending for the Truth as 1 felt to be- 
lieve it. 1 had never heard an Old 
Haytist sermon since I was old enough 
to understand such things until abotu 
this time. When I did hear the preach- 
ing I thought it was the sweetest 
preaching I had ever heard in my life, 
add 't seemed to me that I could un- 
derstand it all from beginning to en I. 
and that the preacher was .just telling 
mv feelings and explaining the scrip- 
tures as I understood and believed 
them. At that in tine I had made a 

time dim and his wile and Bob had 
also professed a hope in Christ, dim 
and Laura joining the Primitive Bap- 
tisls in the spring following. 1 was 
perfectly happy, it seemed. *mfil after 
1 had bee' i with them ami heard them 
tell Iheir experience; then the thought 
came to me thai I had made a. public 
profession before the world and taken 
•part in religious affairs, and that I 
had no experience. Right then my 
troubles and trials began. 0, the times 
1 have wished I had never attended 
thai meeting, or taken part in their 
worship! T felt that if I had not done 
so, and still had experienced what 1 
fell I had. that T would then know that 
it was uot mere excitement; and dur- 
ing all these seven years that has been 
my ureal burden; T have felt that I 
was the 1 greatest hypocrite in the 
wur'd. deceiving others and trying to 
deceive myself. Still, when I think 
of my experience my mind is always 
carried hack to that winter when T 
felt such love and joy in my heart. T 
gave u 1 1 dancing and such worldly 
pleasure's, and really had not the 
slightest desire for such things; still, 
I feel to know that from that time on 
I have suffered more condemnation for 



my sins than 1 could 


have ( 


lone before 


had 1 partaken of al 


1 the 


vile and 


wicked things the W( 


>rld e 


an afford. 


M J ej cs, it seems, w e 


ce on y 


1 hen opeii- 
ind 1 could 


8 *v ^ 'r^bHud ^ ' 


1 ""t d 


1 the ' Bap- 


* : ' ( s ^ ]j p | ( ' ^ j ( 


1 lovet 






delom 


ination, hut 


thought they were 








■ 1 wai 


s si ill alive 


to the world, am 






to give up sin, bul \ 


vent o 
a swe< 


n rolling it 
>t morsel. 


in that "eiutf-souff" 




s"l l!«- l>l \ o'-l 1 




' l' 1 

rieiK S 


S ' * ld° r 1 


make fun of them ll 




Mtu (I inns 


they were right. 


i'i l 






rttT f 


'l'i'l'h'l hi ' 


t'l UOW i * j° V 


eakers 


who have 


m ^ lose ^ eai ne sp 




apparently 


talk so lluen tlx' 1 Th( 




old preac i- 




' ft, 


ie spiril en- 


aides him is the oin 


' S 1 


fco 1'.'.', 


ten to. and 1 care not 


' how'' 




Ch^t ^h" ^ 




h J 




fid P th 


e Savior of 


poor" 1 ost si'nn ers ' ' ' ] 


r Joyec 




them preach, and we 


nt wh< 


;n T had an 


opportunity, for the; 


j mad( 


i the scrip- 


tures so plain to me. 


and t( 


dd my feel- 


ings so well, hut as 


time 


went on 1 


grew more and more 1 


ashamed of thein. 



Then T went to Staunton to school and 
my ambitions took full possession of 
my mind. T wanted to become an ef- 
ficient worker in my way. and while 1 
attended church regularly, it was 
mere form. The preaching was noth- 
ing to me: 1 could get no comfort out 
of it. 

When 1 graduated T came here to 
work, and all the time T was growing 
more self-righteous and wicked, if 
that were possible. T attended cburch 
regnlarly. because you cannot be 1 pop- 
ular with the world, and particularly 
if you live in this town, if you do not 
attend church and take a great part 



8 



ZI0N"8 LANDMARK. 



my eoa- 
d often- 



Lef1 off r 



had planned a fcri] 
tives iu Greenbrie: 
that the Baptists r. 
on the 4th Saturda 
I was so afraid that 



efore 



re to be' 
did all 
t' a* 



1o 



on Thi 
I foun 



but 



world as I 
idolatry out 



go awav 
ched homo 
ib could not leave until 
lso found that Jim had 
ve preaching at his 
sday night, thinking 
,.,oy it. 0 ] Wish I 

• in at that time. It 
e that no human being 
be as sinful, and so 
the things of this 
. 1 had eone off into 



save me. 1 had always enjoyed hear- 
ing Brother llylton preach so much, 
and thought he could make the most 
beautiful 'pictures out of the scriptures 
of the Old Bible 1 ever saw, and he 
eould make everything so plain to 
me; I could gel nothing out of it, and 
I fell that I had no righl to be there 
in that company. Then,; when Brother 
Mitchell gol up he read that part of 
St. I" uke recording the parable of the 
prodigal son. With his first words a 
great change swept over me. Every 
word he uttered seemed to be meaut 
lor me alone. 1 felt myself to be 1 that 
poor son who had received his por- 
tion, traveled to a far country, and 
there spent his all in riotous living un- 
til he had nothing in the world and 
was starving and would fain have eat- 
en the husks the swine did Cat, but in 
them was no nourishmen for him. I 
had tried to. find comfort and consola- 
tion in the world and its religion, but 
their food was as husks to me ; I was 
starv g and perishing with thirst, 
and had not a garment in which to 
wrap my poor naked body, but felt 
that God and all the world could 'see 
my sinful body. 0, the bitter te&rs 
thai rail down my cheeks! Then he 
went - on to tell of how the poor prodi- 
gal said he would arise and go to hi? 



i ile 



ed to 

Whih' 

while 
sin, unv 
this woi 
ing tha 
would 1 
din' waj 
I feel fc 



ho!< 



though I 

lp church 



permit • 



wickedness an 
up the things o 
perhaps did not! 



you see 
ays, and 
i hrough 



• his fathe 
his neek 



an to meet him, fell lip- 
id kisse'd him. And, 0, 
rth. All this joy to my soul! I felt to witness with 
—1 had been that poor soul, for I felt the kind and 
h but ali the gracious Father had seen me while 
yet a great way o.T in sin and rebel- 
lion and had run to meet me, 'pouring 
out his loye and mercy on my poor 
world bead; place'd upon my hand the ring 
of his eternal love, having neither be- 
ginning nor end. but had endured 
from before the beginning of time and 
would continue throughout all etern- 
that^night to see where I stood, on the ity, world without end. I felt that he" 
very brink of destruction and that clothed my poor naked body with the 
nothing bu# his grace eould reach and robe of righteousness, and instead of 



arON'S LANDMARK. 



9 



offering me a crumb from his bount- 
eous table as my soul desired, gave 
me an honored seat at his right hand 
there 1 to feast upon the fatling of the 
flock, which is Jesus the Lord. 

I went home in March thinking I 
would go to the church, but found 
there was no preaching that month, 
and I came back feeling that was to 
show me that I was deceived, then I 
suffered more than ever. I went again 
in May, not expecting to receive any 
comfort, and only after saying to my- 
self over and over that I would not go 
again making the 1 people 1 loved so 
dearly think I had a hope when I had 
none; but such wonderful preaching 
as I heard was a feast to my weary 
soul, and Avhen the door was opened 
for reception of members I felt that 1 
must go, still something prevented me. 
On Sunday when I still did not go for- 
ward I felt that perhaps I would 
never have an opportunity, and 0, how 
dreadful a thing it would be if 1 
should be called to die and had never 
been baptized. It was always baptism 
that was so impressed upon me 1 . On 
Saturday night I tried to beg the Lord 
to show me my duty, and again Sun- 
day night I tried in my feeble way to 
beg him to make plain to me my duty 
and make my will submissive to his, 
and if it was my duty to go to the 
church to make me willing to perform 
that duty. Next morning on the' train 
T sat with the tears running down my 
cheeks all the way, begging to know 
what was my duty. T would look at 
the river as we went alone: and I had 
newer seen water so beautiful in all mv 
life; it was as clear as crystal and 
sparkled in the 1 sunshine like newels, 
and T felt, 0, if I could just he burled 
in its depts T would be the happiest 
mortal on earth. Just before reaching 
my destination T hope the dear Lord 
made mo willing to trive up all for 
his dear sake, and T promised the 



Lord if it was in accordance with his 
righteous and holy will and 1 was per- 
mitted to go back to the meeting in 
July that 1 would go before the breth- 
ren and tell them my troubles and 
leave it to them to decide whether or 
not I was deceived in tiic matter. 

After that I walked from one side 
of the path to the other, one moment 
having a littie hope, the 1 next in the 
depths of despair. I then realized that 
I had chosen the most inconvenient 
time I could have done to go home, for 
July is one of our busiest seasons 'and 
the very week I would have to go was 
decidedly the busiest, but when the 
time came, although I worked hard 
every day and three nights until mid- 
night during that week, when Satur- 
day came there 1 was not a thing to he 
done and not a thing stood in my 
way. When I went before the church 
I felt thai 1 was certaiuly the biggest 
fool (if T may use the expression; mo 
other will so well express it) (hat eVer 
was: ther T was. and T had not a word 
to tell. So many times T had been 
asked to tell something about myself, 
but I could never utter a word, and 
now it was the sa-ro. T was asked a 
few questions ,n 11f i n 10 fi rst th j T 
knew the brotjbe- was putting before 
the church the question of mv re- 
ception. 0. how awful T foil! T had 
given no evidence at all. and T felt 
that they could not possiblv receive 
me, and T felt so wretched. "Rut just, 
then T hope the dear Lord who made 
the dumb ass to speak loosened mv 
tongue and srave me' libertv to tell 
something of mv troubles. When T 
had uttered the last sentence T think T 
conld not have said another thin?: all 
that was needful to be said it seemed 
to me I had said, and nothing more' re- 
mained. Tt seemed to me that such a 
welcome as the dear brethren and sis- 
ters gave me could not be for snch a 
vile sinner as T, and that night, as T 



10 



ETON 1 LANDMARK. 



lay tossing to and fro, 1 decided that ! 
would go to theta next morning and 
beg them to reconsider the matter and 
let me tell them more of my sinfulness, 
for 1 thought 1 must surely have told 
only the best. 

But, when morning came, I was no1 
so strongly impressed to do so, and 
no opportunity offered, and while ail 
seemed to be cheerful and in a pleas- 
ant frame of mind I was cast down 
and could not understand how they 
could appear so happy when we were 
going to a burial. Time and agin the 
thought would come that we were 1 go- 
ing to a burial, and that of a dear 
friend. The service at the water 
seemed like a burial service, but 
through it all it never once came to 
my mind that a baptism is a symbol of 
a burial. T was so burdened with the 
feeling that I was doing wrong to 
take that step, and felt so unworthy, 
but as I walked into the water these 
words passed through my mind, "J 
leave it all to the Lord." As I went 
under the water a groan escaped me 1 , 
whether audible or not, I cannot say ; 
I felt, rather than heard it ; but with 
that groan all my burden left me; I 
seemed to be sinking into eternal rest 
and peace, and even as I lay beneath 
the water T felt a smile cross my face. 
I wished T could just stay there, for I 
had never experienced such rest and 
peace. As I came out of the water these 
words came to me, "Arise to walk in 
newness of life," and such rest and 
peace as Hooded my soul I cannot find 
words to express. There 1 was no wild 
tumuluous joy; just a calm, sweet, 
peaceful rest; I felt to be new and all 
my burden and trouble was gone. 

I wish you could have heard the 
sermon we listened to that day. I had 
never listened to one with such joy 
and peace. It was from the first chap- 
ter of Ruth, and if I have any exper- 
ience, Brother Hylton preached it that 
day. I Mt that I had performed the 



duty imposed upon me, and that it was 
well-pleasing in the sight of the Lord. 
Sometimes when 1 am made to realize 
the wonderful witness 1 have had in 
my soul of my acceptance with him, I 
feel that it is wrong to tfpe'ak of my 
hope as a little one, for if it is a hope 
at all and is of the Lord it must be 
great and good; nothing but good can 
come from him; but of. course i cannot 
always feel so. I feel sometimes that 
he has blessed me' above all creatures 
of earth, for 1 am so much less deserv- 
ing; for 1 feel that he has shown me 
such great and glorious mysteries in 
his holy void, and been so merciful to 
me, the least of all his little 1 children, 
if one at all. I am so prone to sin and 
do so many things that I should not 
do, and above all, my thoughts and 
my heart are so vile and wicked, that 
I wonder many times why he shoul 1 
choose such a creature to be a vessel 
of mercy, but in his wisdom he 1 knows 
all things and does all things for good, 
and while in this world we will con- 
tinue to carry this sinful body and be 
beset with our wicked ways, but when 
his own good time shall come, if we 
are indeed the children of mercy, he 
will take 1 us unto himself where w 
shall be permitted to understand all 
things and know as we are known, and 
there we may praise him for his mercy 
and loving kindness unhampered by 
these sin-polluted bodies throughout all 
eternity. T fe'el all unworthy of the 
fellowship of the dear brethren and 
sisters, but I hope they will bear with 
me, and it is my earnest desire, if T 
know my own heart, that I may nev^r 
do anything to bring reproach upon 
the 1 church T love. T want to live with 
them as long as 1 stay in this world, 
for where else have I to go? "And 
Ruth said, 'Entreat me not to leave 
thee nor to return from following af- 
ter thee, for whither thou goest T will 
go, and whither thou lodgest, I will 
lodge 1 ; thy people shall be my people, 



ZI0N1 LANDMARK. 



11 



and thy God my God. Where thou 
diest 1 will die, and there will 1 be 
buried." 1 feel to hope that 1 have 
died in Christ, and been buried with 
him in baptism, and, 'Blessed are they 
that have 1 'part in the first resurrection, 
tor over such the second death has no 
power." Praise the Lord! 

Dear Aunt Lou, do as you like with 
this. If you find in it any comfort, 
give Cod the praise. From him comes 
every good and perfect gift. 1 trust 1 
have written nothing that will cause 
you distress of miud. 1 would love to 
see and talk with you. It is a joy to 
me merely to be in the presence of 
those 1 feel to be the Lord's little chil- 
dren; and cast among strangers, so to 
speak, as 1 am hers 1 , it is joy unspeak- 
able to be able to meet with the little 
lambs of the fold. 1 feel to love all 
who love the Lord, whether in the fold 
or not; and oh, how 1 do sympathize 
witli those who are' on the outside 
longing ro be taken in as 1 was! How 
dark the way and how rough the path, 
but when ;t pleases the dear Lord to 
show us the right way and lead us in 
the path of duty, what joy attends the 
way and what sweet peace and comfort 
we find. If not deceived, I feel to hope 
that J have been made to realize that 
the Lord does all his pleasure and at 
his own appointed time all things 
shall be accomplished in accordance 
with his will. 

Give my love to all your dear Oam- 
ily; I would like so much to se'e all of 
you. Frances writes me that she, too, 
has come to the church since she went 
to Georgia. I wish 1 could have S'ien 
her when she was with you tins sum- 
mer, but was not so situated thac 1 
could go at that time. Give 1 my love 
to Aunt Mary and tell her I have not 
forgotten her. IVlama was as well a< 
usual when I was home last week. She 
is looking well, but is not so strong 
as she was before sin- had fever a few 
ye'ars ago. 



May the God of peace, mercy aud 
love be with you, and may we with all 
me redeemed meet around his etei ial 
throne, there to 'praise him fore'ver 
and ever, is my prayer. 

1 our loving niece, 

LCLA HOLLAND. 

Remarks: — The above precious let 
ter was wiitten to Sister L. C. Smith, 
L'U.w- THREE 

of Sandy Level, Va., a dear sister. 

P. D. C. 



THE BLACK CREEK UNION. 

This Union will be held with the 
chui eh at Healthy Plains, M. H., Wil- 
son Co., N. C, on Saturday and 5th 
Sunday in Nov. 

Elder J. C. Hooks was chosen to 
•preach the introductory Sermon, and 
E'der J. F. Farmer to be his alter- 
nate. 

Messengers and visitors coming by 
way of Wilson or Raleigh will be met 
at Bailey, N. C, on Norfolk Southern 
Railway Saturday morning. 

K. II. BOS WELL, 
Church Clerk. 



L1NVILLE UNION. 

The next session of the Linville 
Union is appointed to be held with the 
church at Winston-Salem, N. C, on 
Saturday and the fifth Sunday in 
November, 1914. 

An invitation is extended to all 
who have a mind to come, especially 
the ministers. 

W. L. TEAGUE, 

Church Clerk. 

The next session of the Skewarkey 
Union is appointed to be held with 
the church at Cross Roads, Edge- 
combe Co., N. C, on Friday, Satur- 
day and 5th Sunday in November, 
1914. 

W. H. WARD, 



12 



MON'i LANDMARK. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



"Remove not the ancient landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



P. L>. GOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



VOL. XL VIII. NUMBER i 



Entered at the postoi'fiee at Wilson as 
1 class matter. 



WILSON, N. C, NOVEMBER 15, 1914. 

EDI TOR IAL 

EiMD OF VOLUME 47. 

The last issue closed another volume 
oi' Zicn's Landmark. From year to 
year, from month to month, the publi- 
cation of this paper has continued. 

On April 15th, 1871, my name first 
appeared in its editorial department. 
It has ever since then continued with- 
out interruption in the character of 
Editor. Seldom has one person been 
so long preserved in such a service. It 
has been to me a labor of love, because 
I iove the doctrine it contends for, and 
it is pleasant to labor for and with the 
people dear to me. While my labors 
have been imperfect, yet I have done 
what appeared to me to be the best I 
could. We are dependent upon the 
Giver of all blessings for grace to en- 
able us to serve him, and to love him. 

To the brethren now living with 
whom I am laboring I have pleasant 
feelings of friendship and love. Many 
have gone to their long, eternal home 
since 1871. But having obtained mercy 
of the Lord I continue to this present 
time. 

P. D. G. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Elder P. I). Gold, Dear Sir:— Please 
publish in the Landmark your ideas 
about Secret Societies, and why the 
Old Primitive Baptists oppose them. 

FROM A FRIEND. 

Many se'eret societies, some bound 
together by oaths, and others by com- 
pacts, or constitutions, or otherwise, 
for purposes of gain, or self-protection, 
or to gain advantage of others, have 
existed for ages. A notable one in the 
Ac is of the Apostles is recorded where- 
in a number of men bound themselves 
together that they would neither eat 
nor drink until they had killed Paul. 

If one deserves to die* let him be 
executed by the law. It is unsafe, 
dangerous and wrong for men unauth- 
orized by Law, or secretly seek to put 
nu n to death. Every man accused is 
entitled to a fair trial, meeting his ac- 
cusers face to face. 

When men combine together for 
purposes of taking advantage of others, 
of forming sentiments against others, 
and thus organizing societies to get 
advantage of others secretly, as if a 
number of persons unite having rules 
and by-laws, meet in secret and plan 
to conduce their business in secret, or 
conduct their business under cover )L 
darkness, their object being to protect 
themselves against imposition from 
others, and also obtain advantage of 
others in their conduct of business, is 
this objectionable in any sens,-'; WmiM 
that he objectionable conduct for those 
that profess to be followers of Je'sus 
Christ who taught that his followers 
are brethren, and that they should 
esteem others better than themselves ; 
and that love worketh no ill to his 
neighbor, and that he did nothing in 
secret, bul put light on a bushel, or 
table or in a candlestick, so that all 
might behold the light. If the teach- 
ing ix good let all behold it. Let your 



ZI0N1 LANDMARK. 



iight so shiue before men that they 
may see your good works, and glorify 
your Father which is iu heaven. If 
you love righteous liviug let it be dis- 
played m your conduct to others. 

But how should we act toward those 
that are uot members, those that are 
outside, and that are opposed to what 
we believe 1 and love, and that are our 
enemies and would do us wrong if 
they had opportunity / How should 
you act toward them i If thine enemy 
hunger feed him. If he thirst give him 
drink. Bless them that curse you. Ke'- 
turn good for evil is the teaching and 
the example of him who is perfect. 

But must you not take the sword in 
your ow n hand and light your own 
battles yourself .' Jesus said to Peter, 
put up thy sword. The Lord fights the 
battles of those that trust in him. His 
people are nigh and dear unto him, 
and he will avenge his own elect which 
cry day and night unto him, though 
he bare long with them. 

But one says, I am a farmer, and am 
dependant on my labor for a living. If 
I do not join in with others who have 
a Farmer's Alliance, or some other 
combination of men who have found 
a society for their mutual protection 
and defence, I cannot sell my crops to 
advantage, and will lose money, and 
it stands me in hand to watch out for 
number one: for he 1 that provideth not 
for his own househould has denied the 
faith and is worse than an inridel. 

But are we any better than other 
men? Why not, when you are ready 
to sell your crcps go to the marked 
place like other men, and take the 
market or selling price for goods like 
other people do? 

One objection to secret societies and 
such o sanizations of men one class 
against another set them against each 
other, and thus spread the feeling and 
sentiment of hostility one against an- 
other. Behold the strife, confusion 
and war now »ampant in the world. j 



More than one half of the nations of 
the earth are against the others. How 
different this is from the peace Jesus 
gave to his followers. Will not Jesus 
take' care of those that trust in him? 
Are there not things of greater value 
than food and raiment, meat and drink 
in this world? Does not the Lord 
know what our needs are? 

There is no example of a secret so- 
ciety found or sanctioned by Jesus, or 
any apostle, or any prophet, or any 
bible followers of Jesus. Then why 
should we desire them? If the world 
wants them let them have them, but 
we are bette'r off without them. There 
are certain things the world does that 
we do also, such as eat, sleep &c : but 
these things are authorized by scrip- 
ture. But in things not sanctioned by 
scripture we are 1 to abstain from. Be 
ye separate from the world: touch 
not, taste not, handle not. 

P. D. G. 



SO SHINE. 

Let your light so shiue before men 
that, they may se'e your good works, 
and glorify your Father which is in 
heaven." Matt. 5:16. 

The language of Jesus is always 
the truth, right at the time uttered, 
and so opportune that no other senti- 
ment can supply its place. 

YOUR LIGHT. Why is it yours? 
Because God shines in your he'arts — in 
our hearts; not in the hearts of those 
dead in trespasses and in sins. The 
expression "thy faith hath saved 
thee" does not mean that the faith of 
some one 1 else hath saved thee. But it 
is the faith that works in thee. Hast 
thou faith have it to thyself before 
God. But it is the light of the knowl- 
edge of the glory of God in the face 
of Jesus Christ that shines in you, the 
subject of grace. How gre'atly should 
this light be prized as the evidence of 
salvation. Tt should so shine before' 



ZION'g LANDMAHK. 



men that they may see your good 
works and ascribe thein to God, feeling 
mat it is the Father oi' lights that has 
wrought this marvelous work in you. 
Let your light so shine before men. 
You could not let this li^'ht shine it* 
you were dead. You are quickened 
lrom the dead and made alive in Jesus 
Christ. The 1 command "Let" is the 
word oi' Jesus that carries force in it, 
so that where it enters into the heart 
it carries the good desire that the one 
thus addressed should serve the Lord, 
aud glorify (Jod in his body and spiriL 
which belong to God; for Jesus has 
redeemed such from all iniquity there- 
fore they belong to him, and should 
present their bodies a living sacrifice 
which is their reasonable service. 

The light in the'in shines, and being 
children of the light and of the day 
they make manifest that their deeds 
are wrought in God. This light does 
not shine in other men, but it should 
shine before men. It is not put under 
a bushel, but on a candle-stick that the 
light may shine before men. 

These good works are good and 
profitable unto men. Ye are the light 
of the world. How good it is that the 
people of God should so live before 
men that their good should not be evil 
spoken of. Men have right to expect 
more of those taught of God than they 
have right to expect from those not 
taught of God. 

They are to defraud no man, to 
wrong no man, to speak evil of no 
man, to speak the truth always, to 
prove 1 that they have been with Jesus 
and have learned of him. They are 
to walk in honesty toward them that 
are without, their conversation is to 
be in heaven, their treasure '*s in 
heaven from whence they expect the 
Lord Jesus. 

Tf the good works that men see are 
the fruit and product of your own 
heart why should those that behold 
them not glorify you'? Tf you are the 



author of the good works you per- 
form why should not you receive the 
glory ? Why should God be glorified 
if you are the author of good works. 
If it is God that works in you both to 
will and to do of His good pleasure, 
then God is to be glorified in these 
good works, and you will disclaim all 
right to be honored on account of any 
of those good works. Honesty for- 
bids that man should claim what does 
not belong to him, and that glory 
should be ascribed to him to whom 
it is due 1 . If one is honest he does not 
covet that which does not belong to 
him. Shame and confusion of face be- 
long unto us. Hence, when one is 
made honest he desires to speak the 
truth before God and towards man. 
When, therefore, men see the good you 
do, and perceive that these good 
works wrought in you are of God they 
desire to give God the glory, because 
it belongs to Him, and the child of 
God made honest desires to give God 
all; the glory. When your behavior s 
such that it is manifest that God 
works in you botli to will and to do 
of His good pleasure, then honesty 
will compel you to ascribe all the 
glory of good behavior to the Lord, 
and none of it to yourself. It is the 
desire of every one made honest to 
disclaim any good thing in himself, 
and to ascribe all good works to God 
who works in his people both to will 
and to do of his good pleasure. When 
an honest soul can see and fe'el that 
God works in him both to will and tc 
do of his good pleasure, then he feels 
that God ordains peace for him be- 
cause he has wrought all his works 
in him. 

The light of the Lord that, shines in 
the conversation and conduct of the 
Lord's pe'Oj-le must be such as to 
show and prove to men that behol- 1 
that it is the Lord working in such 
both to will and to do, SO that they 
glorify the Lord God in him. 



ZI0N1 LANDMARK. 



LS 



Everyone that doeth evil hateth the 
Light, neither coiaeth to the light, lest 
his deeds should be reproved. For 
the light makes manifest and proves 
the evil doings of the wicked to be 
opposed to God and hating the light. 
But he that doeth truth cometh to the 
light, that his deeds may be- made 
manifest that they are wrought in 
(iod. Such deeds glorify God as the 
author if the work qf faith and Labor 
of love m them. P. D. G. 



NEW VOLUME. 

This is the beginning of the 48th 
volume of Zion's Landmark. It opens 
in an eventful year. No doubt that 
many unexpected and seemingly ad- 
verse things are* enacted contrary to 
what many people have desired or ex- 
pected. The sorrows concealed in the 
curtains of time to be soon unrolled 
come as a surprise to many. Our ob- 
servation however should teach us not 
to expect great things for ourselves. 
In evil days the threatening clouds or 
skies lowering should teach us that it 
is prudent to not expect much of per- 
ilous times when the days are* evil. 

However it is not a day of unmixed 
evil. Our cycle of the world is so far 
k&p\ from the disastrous wars of the 
east. 

Many of our people fat in the pros- 
perity of the fulness of bread have" 
been spending their time and money 
in admiring the fashion and dissipa 
tion of the old world. 

Many of them were caught in the 
vortex of war and found much dif- 
ficulty in reaching home. Better is a 
pie^e of bread with content than a 
stalled ox and hatred therewith. She 
that tarrieth at home takes the prey. 
To stay at home and build up around 
your own abode is safer and le'ss cost- 
ly. They that seek the peace of Jeru- 
salem are better employed than they 
whose eyes wander to the 1 end of the 



earth. ^ 

On general principles without pos- 
sessing the kin of a prophet one can 
predict safety for those whose guide 
for the future is taking iiee'd to the 
things that they have already tasted, 
handled and felt. 

Seek not great things for thyself; 
but seek first the kingdom of God and 
his righteousness and all necde'd things 
shall be added. 

The (iod of Israel rules as surely 
and as certainly in times of war as 
in times of apparent or real peace. It 
is always such a time of danger to the 
heedless as to call for prudent counsel; 
yet such a time as trust in the Lord 
lor all things is needful. 

P. D. G. 



MAN IN THE TMAGE OF HIS 
MAKER, GEN. 1 :26. 

In all the wonders of creation the 
greatest is man. "What a wonderful 
consultation is this wherein God said, 
Let us make man in our image, after 
our likeness, and let them have domin- 
ion over every creeping thing that 
creepeth over all the earth. So man 
only is in the image of his creator. 

We will consider this feature in on- 
ly one 1 aspect at present — namely in 
his dominion. H * 

What it was before his transgression 
we know not. Adam had proper 
knowledge to name all the animals of 
creation. Man's purpose or power to 
pre-appoint or foretell is often attempt 
ed, but it is not perfect. T hear it 
stated that man predestinates or pur- 
poses, or has his choice, and hence in 
this he is like God. But is it a fact 
that man or devil can predestinate any 
thing? Men would like to have their 
own way. and decide or determine he- 
fore hand what shall be. 

In Atlanta, Ga., T made this state- 
ment, that God only can predestinate 
any thing. A brother said, he thought 



16 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



he ftould predestinate things. A little 
nephew of his said, Uncle, you would 
have to be before or older than the 
world to predestinate any thing. Now 
let us consider this a little. What is 
involved in this.' Suppose sonic one 
should dre'am that at a certain time a 
father with his eleven sons should 
bow to his other son, and the 1 father 
should rebuke this sou, and the eleven 
should decide they would not do this, 
and conspire to prevent this and de- 
feat his dreams. When this one dream- 
ed he was not proposing before baud 
to bring this about. One does not will 
what he will dream. But every other 
power, so far as it is necessary, shall 
do wind is necessary for it to do. 
Whether any one of the actors is con- 
scious that h< J is used to aid in bring- 
ing this event to pass or not. 

The history of Joseph is not a mat- 
ter planned by him, nor any other 
one. There were many things in it 
grievous to him and his father, and 
bumbling to his brethren. No one was 
consulted whether he would like it or 
not. Where is free agency in the mat- 
ter? It is true his brethren acted ac- 
cording to what was in their mind 
when they sold him into slavery, and 
sent him off from home. Bnt was it 
fixe'd that Joseph should be cast into 
prison? Yes. «Tt was necessary that 
bis feet should be made fast in the 
stocks, and that he should teach wis- 
dom to the Senators of Egvpt. (Psalms 
105.) The wav Joseph shnnld go to 
prison would be through false charges 
of an unclean woman falsely accusing 
him. Was the chain of predestina- 
tion purposed beforehand by the 
Lord. "Did the Lord predestinate every 
part of this, and all for the good of 
his chosen? 

Predestination is the working out 
and bringing to pass the purpose nf 
God who works all things after the 
counsel of his oAvn will. Wicked men 
and men that desire to do right ara 



used in this matter. But not a man 
living plans, purposes or controls any 
of these things. 

After the transgression of man the 
imagination of the thought of men's 
hearts was only evil and that continu- 
ally. Gen. 6:5. So dark is in man's 
mind that he cannot fore'see a day or 
an hour befoi heaud what to will or to 
do and to decree what shall be. Nor 
can he so controj. the minds and lives 
of others as to cause them to do what 
he purposes to be done, or desires to 
be done 1 . Among the uncertainties of 
earth not the least perhaps to man is 
his weakness and vanity, his helpless- 
ness in things of earth, much more of 
things beyond his vision and sight. 

Since the fall of man his desires are 
as boundless and ungovernable 1 as if 
he possessed power sufficient to do all 
he could wish. But the power to con- 
trol his desires is as far beyond his 
ability as he is unable to be a god to 
himself, or to any other. All his de- 
sires uneontrolable' as they are have 
become impossible of performance by 
him so that he is in no sense such as 
he was in the day of his uprightness. 
No wisdom to restrain from wrong 
nor to guide him to do right. 

Things are found or shaped in men's 
minds that he desires to perform. This 
he thinks he can do. These thoughts 
or purposes take possession of him. 
They control him. They are not right 
but they become his master often. But 
his guide or judgment is false or mis- 
leading, and it betrays or deceives 
him, and he becomes the victim of a 
fatal delusion. He judges from the 
appe'arance of the weather that it will 
rain soon. If it does rain early or soon 
he thinks that his feeling that it wonld 
rain, or his prognostication of rain is 
somewhat the cause of the rain, where- 
as if he had not been living even the 
rain wonld have been the same. While 
there is a cause for every thing, yet 
man is not the cause. P. D. G. 



ZI0N1 LANDMARK 



17 



WHAT ABE SOME EVIDENCES OF 
NEW BIRTH.' 

One is the old birth decays and van- 
ishes away, b'or there is a correspon- 
dence and relationship netween things 
of like nature. Works o- creation are 
of the earth, hence tln\ piss away as 
things that are seen, and therefore 
must perish, that the things i.'hich are 
unseen Q||.y remain. When therefore 
one begins to feel that hi is a failure, 
and loses confidence in t>! flesh he be- 
gins to be burdened wiiii an old man, 
as one that is deceitful am', corrupt- 
and cannot be trusted in, nor depend- 
ed on, because his works are a failure, 
partaking of the nature of the li<»sh 
and Heshly or first covenant, whi m 
makes nothing perfect. 

Now who or what is it that sets up 
in this judgment of condemnation 
against the works of tin- flesh:' it is 
not the Hesh itself. But it must be 
some principle or power or Spirit dif- 
ferent from the 1 H sh, that does not see 
or feel as the flesh does, and does no! 
judge as the flesh does, nor approve 
what the flesh does, that sees so dif- 
ferently and judge's so differently, so 
that the two are contrary tie,' one to 
the other, to the extent that the two 
never agree. Por naturally what the 
flesh does pleased itself, it therefore 
there is in you that which the !e>h 
cannot please, and that which : iot 
please the flesh, surely there must be 
two manner' of spirits or principles in 
you. Hence 1 you must be a new crea- 
ture, or born again. Por that which is 
born of the flesh is flesh, and that which 
is born of the spirit is spirit. So that 
if any man be born again, or be in 
Christ Jesus he is a new creature, old 
things are passed away, an dbehold all 
things are become new. ami all things 
are 1 of God. 

Why is it then that this one is often 
in doubt concerning his own case, yet 
so confident of the new birth of others 



who feel and think as this one does*? 
It is because each one knows the piag 
ue of his own he'art, and considers his 
own ease is worse thai: .hat of others, 
so that necessarily he prefers athers 
to himself, which is strong evidence to 
others Ik.i he is born t'gain. Por th? 
signs that one Is boru of God are. much 
clearer to others than thc-y are t > 
himself'. For he lels ins ligiit so shim- 
that others see his good works, and 
so they glorify God in his behalf. For 
we know that we are bom of God 
¥1 hen we love the brethren not because 1 
we love ourselves. For it is the na- 
ture of one born of 'Jod to love; the 
lire th ron, but to hate his own life, 
while 1 it is the nature of one not born 
of (iod to love iiis own corrupt lift* 

Why does not this new creature seem 
to improve or grow better the longer 
we live, since we think that if we are 
truly horn of God we would see such 
marks of improvement in us as would 
assure us that we are born again, but 
we see more of the old man, and feel 
more of that than we do of what we 
consider is the new man. There is no 
discharge in this war, but the battle 1 
rages until t lie end of the day, or un- 
til sun-down. This compels us to feel 
and know that without Christ we can 
do nothing, or is the life of faith. 

P. D. G. 



WAR! WAR! 

Elder P. I). Gold:— If you have a 
mind I would he glad to have your 
views on this war. Is it the last great 
war? And do you think this is the 
time Christ speaks of where he says 
that there never was such sorrow sine* 
the world was; and do you believe this 
will be the overthrowing of all earth 
ly governments.' What do you think 
of "Pastor Russell" of P.rooklv, N. 
Y? 

Yours in hope, 

J. W. BRfWN. 



is 



BION'S LANDMARK 



Remarks > — I am not a prophet, noi 
the son of a prophet. Man taught me 
to plow, grub, clear land, and culti- 
vate it; lo kill weeds, and till crops, or 
dig bread out of mother earth. 

While i do not know what awaits 
us in the" travail of the future so omi- 
nous now of evil, 1 have had thoughts 

brewing for years. While the nations 
of earth have been calling each other 
brothers, and claiming the Lord God 
as their Father, asserting a universal 
Fatherhood and brotherhood, and 
professing such progress in religious 
civilization as to have the world about 
ripe and ready for the millennium, 
through their religious efforts and suc- 
cess at evangelization of the heathen, 
any one looking a little beneath the 
surface of such claims, and exclaim- 
ing why such outlays of money, bur- 
dening these nations with large stand- 
ing armies and navies. What is the 
evidence that these nations are learn- 
ing war no more, but are beating their 
swords into plow-shares, and their 
spears into pruning hooks.' Such wis 
the progress in education, reihiemenc, 
honesty and brotherly love that the 
lion, the tiger and the bear are ail 
converted into the land), and that 
beastly nature of war is gone, was the 
assertion proclaimed from the house- 
top. When lo and behold the eagle 
pounces on the chicken, the bear at- 
tempts to craunch the cow so rapidly 
half the leading, foremost nations of 
the earth in refinement, civilization, 
science and religion are seizing eacu 
oilier by the throat in the furious en- 
deavor to destroy each other. 

Now where is the mercy, the good 
will, the charity so much talked of? 
One of the bitterest wars I have ever 
read of is now raging among more 
than ball' the nations of the earth. Nor 
is it to destroy crime ami punish cor- 
ruption, but it is for htsfc 

'Hie time refered to by the Saviour 



that should exceed all suffering in the 
world was the destruction of Jerusa- 
lem. 

Man may gloss himself in the pol- 
ish of pretended meekness, but the 
beastly nature of the wolf lurks with- 
in him. 

1 do not consider that this is the 
last war. While the world stands 
(this world) there shall be wars and 
rumors of wars. 

One reason it occurs to me why this 
war rages is that the nations of the 
earth are lifted up with pride and 
presumption, of nattering themselves 
of their ability to rule, and boasting of 
their great progress, and not acknowl- 
edging the dominion of Almighty God 
who does bis pleasure in the army of 
heaven, and among the inhabitants of 
earth, raising up one and putting down 
another. 

Now be is using these proud nations 
of earth to chastise each other, and 
show them that God rules in heaven 
above and in the earth beneath, and 
that the pride, extravagance, love ol 
money, show, Inventions of earth, 

annihilate distance, conquer the ele- 
ments, explore and explode the sec- 
rets of nature, and proclaim his Lord- 
ship shall all be turned into folly and 
shame. Pride shall be humbled, and 
man taught that kings, rulers and po- 
tentates, style, gaudy cities, and other 
tokens of progress shall be shown to 
be nothing but creature works: but 
sincerity of purpose, humility of spir- 
it, true love of man for his fellow, all 
being the creatures of God, and good 
will, peace and joy in the Holy Ghost, 
each allowing others to worship as it 
seems good to them, none daring t > 
molest or make afraid, and the God of 
peace who brought again from the dead 
our Lord Jesus, that great Shepherd 
of the sheep, though the' blood of the 
everlasting covenant, shall make his 
people perfect, working iu them to 



ZION'S LANDMARK!. 



19 



will and to do of Mk good pleasure 
through Jesus Christ, who must reign 
until every enemy .shall be" put under 
his feet, shall all be accomplished. 

The great battle of Armageddon 
shall he fought in the strife and con- 
tact between truth and error, light 
and darkness. The conflict shall raw 
until the power and dominion of satan 
exercised in false religion, and in po- 
litical chicanery, deceit and oppres- 
sion, shah continue and rage until the 
will of God is accomplished in the 
downfall and destruction of sin and 

power of Satan, sin and death, and 
nil that love and make a lie shall be 
turned into hell togeth(*r with all the 
nations that forget God. Then the 
righteous shall shine in the kingdom 
of God in glory above the brightness 
of the natural sun. 

When all the'se things shall be ac- 
complished T know not. But the word 
of God supports this conclusion. Let 
us wait and in patience possess our 
souls. Jesus being our refuge and hid- 
ing place. 

What do I think of "Pastor Russell." 
We do well to follow no man who does 
not follow the Lord Jesus who is Lord 
of lords and King of kings, who only 
hath immortality, dwelling in light 
which no man hath seem, nor can see ; 
but blessed are all they that on the 
white horse of the gospel follow Jesus. 

Tf any man say lo here is Christ, or 
lo he is there, go not after him. When 
Jesus comes it will he in such glorv 
that every eye shall see him, and they 
that pierced him, and he will be glor- 
ified in all them that love his appear- 
ing. 

P. D. G. 



All orders for Primitive Raf tist 
Minutes and any other kind of Print- 
ing neatly and promptly executed by 
us. 



'uuaries. 



ENN1VAL WHITFIELD. 

On Tuesday, Nov. 10th. just Before 
the beautiful sun was fixing to hide 
its rays beneath the hills, little En- 
nival Whitfield, son of .Mr. and Mrs. 
J. W. Whitfield, of Wilson, N. C.] was 
accidentally shot by his brother-in- 
law Mr. li'. W. Jones, near the city, 
and his little soul passed aVay on the 
following day. back to Gqd who gave 
him life, there to rest in peace forever 

Ennival was a bright little 1 fellow-, 
t he apple of his fond parents, 1 eyes, and 
beloved by all his Little comrades, both 
in his neighborhood and the I'.ox 
Scouts, of which he was a faithful lit- 
tle member. 

Take hope, fond parents, for God 
in his all-wise way does things better 
known to himself — for he never errs. 

May Cod's protecting arm ever be 
about the sad heart of Mr. Jones, in 
his grief. 

Ennival was laid to rest in beautiful 
Maplewood cemetery. Thursday, Nov. 
12, there to await the res.surrection 
morn. 

Written by r, friend, 
J. E. B. 



EBLINE TRAVATHAN. 

By request 1 will try to write some- 
thing of my dear aunt. Ebline Treva- 
than, daughter of William and Exeline, 
Lucas. She was born April 29. 1848, . 
and departed this life Oct. 22, 1913. 
making her stay on earth fi5 years. 5 
months and 23 days. She was mar- 
ried to Jesse Trevathan, date un- 
known to the writer, joined the Primi- 
tive Baptist church at Lower Black 
Creek, baptized b->^ Elder A. J, Moore 
in the year of 1878. 



20 



HON* LJLNDilAJtlL 



Aunt Ebb, as she was called, was 
one- of the faithful oues. Her seat was 
never vacant unless providentially hin- 
dered. She' was one oi' the sweet sin- 
gers in Israel, and O, how we miss 
her cheerful face, and sweet voice. We 
were at a loss to sing without her. 
Even lier presence seemed to be reviv- 
ing. She always had a word for every 
one. Auut Ebb's home was a place 
of welcome for the Baptists. She was 
very industrious, and did all she could 
for the pleasure of her brethren, and 
had more company than any member 
so long as she was able to prepare for 
them. She was always thoughtful of 
her pastor. Many times have I seen 
her go to church with a lunch for 
him, saying it was too much for him 
to preach and go home without din- 
ner. When she was no longer able to 
fill her seat at church she seemed 'per- 
fectly resigned, never murmuring at 
her stay, nor wishing her sufferings 
less. She was partially paralyzed 
which rendered her unable to walk 
for some time before she died. Whe*u 
asked how she was, her reply was, "I 
am as well as anybody, just sitting 
here waiting the Lord's time, am tired 
of this world, and want to go home. 1 
feel sure 1 she is now basking in God's 
love, where congregations never break 
up, and sabbaths never end, there with 
that same Jesus that John saw ascend 
to glory. 0, glorious thought that In; 
is coming again. May we all be' pre- 
pared to meet her in that haven of 
rest. 

Aunt Ebb was gently cared for in 
her last days by John Skinner and his 
wife, and Geneva, her niece. All was 
done for her that loving hands could 
do. May the 1 Lord bless them: for 
that that we sow we shall also reap. 

I feel that I have not done her jus- 
tice, but where there is little given 
there is but little required. 

Written by her niece, 

MRS. W. G. RAPER. 



JAMES SPENCER ODELL. 

Elder P. D. Gold:— it is with a sad 
heart 1 attempt to write the death of 
my sister's little babe for publication 
in Zion's Landmark. 

Little James S'pencer Odell was 
born January the 25, 11)14, ami died 
April the 8th, 1914, making his slay 
on earth two months, and 14 days, lie 
was the only sou of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
P. Odell. 

Little James was a bright little boy 
with a smile on his face all the time. 

The 1 night that he died he looked at 
his mother aud laughed as if he want- 
ed to tell her something; and oh how- 
sad to awake the next morning and 
find her precious little darling dead in 
her arms. 

It leaves father, mother, two grand- 
fathers, two grand-mothers, and lots 
of relatives to mourn their loss, while 
our loss is its eternal gain. 

The precious little flower budded 
on earth to blossom in heaven. 

A precious one to us is gone, 
A voice we love'd is stilled, 
A place is vacant in our home, 
Which never can be filled. 

Written by 
MRS. C. W. UNDERWOOD. 



MRS. ANNA PRIVETT. 

Dear Mr. Gold:— Guess you have 
heard of my mother's death, Mrs. An- 
na Privett. She died on the 25th oF 
Oct. and was burie'd on the 27th. 

Mr. Gold, we gave up father three 
years ago, and now Ave have given up 
mother, our greatest treasure. 

Mother was a member at the Lower 
Black Creek church. She leaves four 
girls and one boy. 

Our loss is her gain, but Oh ! it is so 
hard to give up our darling mother. 

Brother George Boswell (I shall al- 



• \ 

ZION'l LANDMARK. { ( 21 



ways call him brother, because mother 
did J preached her funeral. 

When 1 started this letter 1 thought 
I was going to write a re'al long let- 
ter, but my heart is so full 1 can t 
write. 

.Mr. Cold, please have my mother's 
death put in the Landmark. Mamma 
was always so anxious to get the Land- 
mark. 

Remember us in your prayers. 

Hope you and family are well. 1 
would be glad to hear from you. 

May the Lord be with us all. 
' (MISS) LENA G. PRIVBTT. 
Clegg Hotel, Greensboro, N. C. 



ELDER SAMUEL McMILLAN. 

Wadcsboro— Dec. 8 and at night. 
Lawyer's Spring — 9. 
Jerusalem— 10. 
Watson — 11. 

Pleasant Grove — 12 and 13. 
Wingate — 13 at night. 
High Hill— 14. 



ELD. J. AV. WILLIAMS, COL. 

Durham, Dec. 14 — at night. 
Milt Grove— 15. 
Pine Hill— 16. 
White Oak Grove — 17. 
Grc'ensboro 17, — at night. 
Philippi— 18. 
New Center— 19. 
Danbury— 20. 
Reidsville— 20 at night. 



ELDER P. W. WILLTARD. 

Monday night, Nov. 30 at Durham. 
Tuesday. De'e. 1, Eno, 11 o'clock. 
Wednesday 2— Ross. 
Thursday 3 — Dutchville and a* 
night. Stem, N. C. 

Friday 4 — Camp Creek. 

Saturday and 1st Sun. — Tar River. 

Monday, Dec. 7 — Surls. 



Tuesday, 8 — Helena. 
Wednesday, 9 — Flat River. 
Thursday, 10 — Roxboro and at night. 
Friday, 11 — Stories Creek. 
Saturday and 2nd Sun. — Wheelers. 
Monday after — Prospect Hill. 
Tuesday — Lynch 's Ci'eek. 
Wednesday — Harmony. 
Thursday — MeCrays. 
Friday — Gilliams. 

Saturday and 3rd Sunday — Burling- 
ton. 

Will be dependent for conveyance. 



R. E. ADAMS. 

Thursday night before the 1st Sun- 
day in December — Durham. 

Prjday — : Camp Creek. 

Saturday and 1st Sunday Surl. 

Monday — Helena. 

Tuesday — Flat River. 

Tuesday at night — Roxboro. 

Wednesday — Shiloh. 

Thursday — Stories Creek. 

Friday — Ebenezer. 

Saturday and 2nd Sunday — Wheel 
ers. 

Monday — Prospect Hill. 
Tuesday — Lynches Creek. 
Wednesday — Arbor. 
Thursday — Pleasant Grove. 
Friday — New Hope. 
Saturday and 3rd Sunday — Monti- 
cello. 

Monday at noon — Gilliams. 
Tuesday — MeCrays. 
Wednesday— Harmony. 

L. H. HARDY. 



ELDERS B. L. TREECE AND J. E. 
WILLIAMS. 

Freedom— Nov. 23. 
Harwood Chapel— 24. 
Beaton's Stand— 25 and 26. 
Suggs Creek— 28. 
Calicutt— 29. 
Rock Hill— 30. 
Continued on Page 24 — 



IF 

READ EVERY WORD OF THIS 
REMARKABLE STORY. 

It is told by one who has himself ex- 
perienced the regeneration in health 
which he encourages yo uto seek by 
the self-same means. 
THE STORY OF A GREAT DIS- 
COVERY. 
The hardships of a traveling sales- 
man's life had wrecked my health. My 
family physician diagnosed my case 
as chronic gastritis, brought on by 
diseases of the liver and complicated 
by kidney trouble'. 1 consulted spe- 
cialists who confirmed his diagnosis. 
Months passed, 1 grew worse and was 
finally compelled to give up my work. 

By' chance 1 heard of some wonder- 
ful cures which had resulted from 
drinking the water of a little spring in 
the .Mineral Belt of South Carolina, a 
picture 1 of which spring appears on 
this page. In desperation I tried it. 
On the second day I thought that I 
could notice 1 some improvement; at 
the end of the first v/eek my appetite 
and digestion had returned and I was 
much stronger; at the end of tin- third 
week I felt that I was completely, 
cured. That was six years ago and 1 
still enjoy perfect health. 

Knowing that it had restored my 
health and believing that it had saved 
my life, I bought the Spring. 

I then determined to see whether 
the water would cure others as it hail 
cured me. I shipped ten gallons ab- 
solutely free of charge to e'ach of one 
thousand sufferers from chronic dis- 
eases. Only four reported no benefit 
from the use of the ten gallons. The 
other nine hundre'd and ninety-six 
reported decided benefit or complete 
cures. Many claimed that the water 
had saved their lives. 

T realized that I had discovered one 
of the world's greatest mineral springs 
and I decided to devote my life to it. 
But, how could I make the world lis- 
ten ; how could I make them believe 



YOU VALUE 




my story.' The precious water was 
running to waste while thousands 
were suffering. I said, I will make 
them believe me by showing my faith 
in them and in the curative power of 
the Spring. I will tell them that the 
water shall cost them nothing if it 
fails to benefit. 

The world listened! 

Some wrote for proof and I sent 
them the letters which I had received 
from their fellowmen. Others accept- 
ed my offer without question. Thous- 
ands have written me reporting relief 
and permanent cure of a great variety 
of chronic disease's. 

But some of the water still ran to 
waste for lack of belief. I determined 
that eve;- drop should be used to 
relieve the sufferings of humanity. To 
this e*nd I requested the advertising 
manager of the "Wesleyan Christian 
Advocate to come to see me. At mv 
desk T opened my mail and showed 
him the letters from men and women 
from all parts of the country Avho had 
suffered and who had found relief. T 
crave him my letter files and induced 
him to spend several hours reading my 
past correspondence with those who 
were using the water. T showed him 
the che'mical analvsis and letters from 
physicians explaining the curative 
properties of the water. 



24 ZION't 

Continued from Page 21 — 
Pierces Chapel — Dec. 1. 
Toms Creek — 2. 
.Flat Croek — 3. 
Mountain Creek — 4. 
Albermarle at nignt. 
Conveyance needed for three. 



ELDER B. F. McKINNEY. 

Lynches Creek — Thursday before 
the 4t!i Sunday in Nov. 

Harmony — Friday. 

Prospect Ilill — Sat. and 4th Sun. in 
Nov. 

Wheel ers — M onday . 
Flat River — Tuesday. 
Roxboro — Wednesday and at nigh 
Surl — Thursday. 
Stories Creek — Friday. 
Durham — 5th S uiday night in No- 
Mt. Lebanorf — Monday. 
1 Turlington — Monday night. 
Greensboro — Tuesday night. 
High Point — Wednesday night. 
Abbotts Creek — Thursday 
Saints Delight — Friday. 
Hillsdale — Saturday, 
lieidsville — Saturday night. 
Lick Fork — 1st Sunday in Dec 
Will need conveyance while off the 
railroad. 



The next session of the Dutchvilk 
Union will be held with the ehurch at 
Cedar Grove, M. H., in Wake^o., N. 
C. on Saturday and 5th Sunday in 
Nov. 1914. 

Those coming by Raleigh will get 
off at Wake Forest at 12:20 Friday. 
Those coining by Durham will be met 
at Creedmore, Friday, if writer is 
notified in time to get conveyance. 

A cordial welcome will be given, 
especially to ministers. 

J. W. POWELL, 
Church Clerk. 



The next session of the Contentnea 
Union will be held at Autrys Creek, 



Edgecombe Co., N. C, Sat. and 5th 
Sunday in Nov. Elder T. P>. Lancas- 
ter was chosen to preach the first 
sermon and Elder J. B. Roberts his 
alternate. 

Visiting brethren and sisters are 
invited to attend. 

Those coming by rail will be met at 
McClesfield on Friday evening. Please 
notify any of the following brethren: 

A. M. Crisp, J. F. Brown, R. B. Ed- 
wards at Macclesfield, N. C. 



The next session of the Smithfitfld 
Union will meet with the church it 
Smithfield, Johnston Co., N. G, on 
Saturday and 5th Sunday in Nov. 
1914. 

Brethren, sisters and friends, espec- 
ially ministers, are cordially invited 
to attend. 

Elder J. H. Johnson is appointed to 
preach the introductory sermon and 
Elder J. T. Coats his alternate. 

It is convenient to railroad for pas 
sengers who wish to come. 

Your is hope, 

J. A. BATTEN. 
Union Clerk, 



The next session of the Staunton 
River Union will be held with the 
church at Oak Grove. Campbell Co.. 
Va., Friday, Saturday and 5th Sun- 
day in November, 1914. 

We extend an invitation to all lov- 
ers of the truth that wish to come. 
Those coming by rail will get. off at 
Winfall Station on the Lynchburg & 
Durham road 15 miles South of Lynch- 
burg. The church is one mile from 
station. 

W. N. JEFFERSON. 

Church Clerk. 



The next Black River Union meet- 
in sr will be held, the Lord willing, 
with the church at Primitive Zion. 
Harnett Countv. N. C. Saturday and 

Continued on Cover — 



aOITS LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED 8IMI- MONTHLY 
A T 

WILSON, N01T HtffcC 1BOLIN1 

Primitive or Old School Baptist 

VOL. XLVIII. WILSON, X. C., DEC. 1, 1914. NO. 2. 




P. D. GOLD, Editor. . 



P Q. LBSTBR, A*c. Editor. 



. Wil*m, N. G 
. . Floyd, V». 



U K PEE THAJL 



Reduced Round Trip 
Rates 

WILL BE MADE FOE SPECIAL OCOASIONS BY THE 

Atlantic Coast Line 

The Standard Railroad of the South 

THE RATES ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 



O. W. JOHNS, 
Ticket Agent, Wilson, N. C, or address 
T. C. WHITE, W. J. CRAIG, 

6hm. Pass. Afent, Pass. Traf. Mgr. 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Norfolk Southern iffiy. 

ROUTE OF TCB 

"NIGHT EXPRESS' 9 

Runs from Norfolk to Charlotte, and from Goldsboro to 
Morehead City. 
Fast through schedule from the* Mountains to the Coast. 

H. S. LEARD, 
General Passenger Agent, 
Norfolk, Va. 

E. D. KYLE. 

Traffic Manager, 

Norfolk, Ya. ; I 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



We consider ii prdper to present Dr. might lead a reader to suppose that 

lloop.-rs reply to my answer to his you would not thank me tor claiming 

inquiry, and to give my rejoinder, the relationship. To a great part of 

Consider the ease. Dr. Hooper fairly your article 1 have not the least objec- 

presents the missionary sid« oi tlie lion. It is a plain, pious account of 

question. 1\ D. O. your progress in religion from unir 

.hi'. Editor:— J find from letters generate blindness and indifference, by 
written to you that your readers are sharp conviction, to the light and lib- 
expecting and even demanding of me erty of the gospel, and is just such an 
an answer to Elder Cold's expose of account as any member of our church 
his creed and his condemnation of would mala; if he were to relate 1 his 
ours. 1 have not felt that by my first religious experience to a body of 
letter to him 1 laid myself under obli- brethren with a view to procure ad- 
Si s to continue the discussion. His mission into a church or impart it !:> 

party no doubt will claim for him a the private ear of a single brother 

triumph over me, and so they will if while they were communing one with 

I were to write till the end of jth<? another. 

year. And as to our own party, I trust Your account of religious doctrines 
none of them are even -'almost 'per- taken from the Bible, which are so dear 
suaded" to be "Old School" by Mr. to you and constitute the life and com- 
a's arguments. But as some of his fori of your soul, our "people feed upon 
statements are exceedingly erroneous and rejoice in, as well as yours. Do 
and some of his objections plausible, you believe in Cod's sovereign choice 
I will try to snatch sufficient time of' some to everlasting life? So do we. 
from the interruption of travel to show Do yon believe in his striving with 
the fallacy of his conclusions and the others, by law and gospel, to overcome 
unkindness and injustice of some of their opposition, and finally leaving 
his charges P.gainsjt us. them to perish for their willful unbelief 
WM. HOOPER. and disobedience? So do we. Do you 

Raleigh, August 2d. believe in the total alienation of man's 
heart from Cod. since the fall, and his 

TO ELDER I\ 1). COLD. entire inability of himself to recover 

.My Dear Brother :— For such I find himself from that stale.' So do Ave. 

it in my heart to call you. though fee Do yon believe that man cannot merit 

hard language and accusations you any reward at the hands of Cod. be- ■ 

employ against us in your late expo- cruse after all his doings he is still an 

sit ion of your reasons for leaving us unprofitable servant, having fallen far 



!6 WON '9 LANDMARK. 

lort of his duties and obligations? So yon so misunderstand your own doc- 

o we. Thus far then we agree in pro- trines as to warrant such good Chris- 

jssion. But you say our conduct con- tian activity as you display. But we 

•adicts our profession and that we wonder how you can reconcile your ac- 

iow, by the employment of so inanj tivity with the fair and logical de'duc- 

lat we rely on them for the extension Your creed says: "Stand still and 

E Christ's kingdom; whereas, God's see the salvation of God." Your prae- 

ecree 1 ami purpose and promises in- tice says: "Work while it is called 

ire the event, and make all these of- today." "Be instant in season, out of 

cious activities of men not only super- season." "Be wrokers together with 

uous but presumptuous and dishonor- God." Such are the scoffs of Armin- 

lg to God, as if he could be beholden ians against the doctrines which you 

) men for the accomplishment oi his and we profess to hold in common, 

e'signs. Now this presents the whole You see that, with all your denuncia- 

ariance between us. You interpret- tion of Arminianism, it feeds and 

le Bible so as to make the foreknowl- grows by the witnessed operation of 

:lge and predestination of God to save your fatalism. We, on the other hand, 



regard to ins own personal salvation, der How John Wesley ami his pious 

and tie his hands from a single effort followers can fail to see it, how they 

to convert others. This is just the can regard Paul as an inspired teacher 

charge that the Arminians bring and not accept these doctrines as the 

against the doctrines of election and revealed truth of God. Much move do 

predestination. They say: these doc- we wonder that they can rail at them 

trines, if really believed in, must lead as pernicious and aobminable. But. 

to fatalism, and that any professed be- seeing plainly that both these things 

and logical necessity, to abstain from sovereignty and man's active co-opera- 

all attempts to co-operate with God. tion, we adopt them both into our 

And this they say is the ground of their creed, although we may not be able 

opposition to and abhorrence' of these to show how they harmonize' with one 

doctrines. And they may point to the another. We go "by Bible precept. We 

Old School Baptists as exemplifications work by Bible example. We see Paul, 

of their assertions. They say: See the great champion of free grace and 

what a dead palsy pervades the whole divine preordination, working night 

mass! These are the genuine fruits of and day to carry into effect the de- 

your Calvinistic doctrines. The Old signs of God as if everything depend- 

School Baptists are consistent - at least ed on his efforts. While he inculcates 

they act according to their principles. mos1 strongly that "God alone giveth 

You Missionary Baptists, professing the increase," he is as industrious in 

the same creed with them, belie and planting and Appollos as diligent in 

contradict your creed at every motion watering a*s if "God's husbandry" 

that you make. Your creed blinds you would perish without their activity, 

to make no more efforts to promote re- We hear Paul and his fellow Apostles 

or your lungs play. We are glad thai sant and abundant i» good work, and 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



27 



"Son, this is 
to earn our 



liberal in giving money, without any 
fear that some objector would turn 
upon them and 
legality — this is t 
salvation by our own merits." All the 
teachings and all the toils of the Apos- 
iles establish, on a foundation of rock, 
the consistency of man's efforts with 
(Jod's decrees, and that man's efforts 
are' the appointed means of achieving 
(lod"s purposes; that those efforts are, 
in fact, the results of fruits of the 
pious dispositions, implanted in the 
soul by (iod himself, in-order to impel 
his servants t o their required work. 
Yet if one goes around to your several 
pulpits there is nothing which he will 
hear mere harped upon and upbraided 
than these good works, as indications 
of a belief in all our preachers and 
people that we are saved by our own 
works and earnings. When all our 
preachers, so far as I know, disown and 



lil 



tei of representatives from t ! 
tour Leading denominations in tl 
fclnrted States, Baptists, Episcopalian 
Methodists, and Presbyterians, this s; 
©iety issues t/acts and volumes to 111 
value of more than three htindre 
thousand dollars annually. 1 say : 
any of your body can put their fhlg< 
on one sentence in all the ten thousail 
and even millions of pages poure 
forth by this society, the organ an 
representative of the col 
doxy of America, can pu 
mi a sentence teaching g< 
earning and meriting sa 
to be done with that end 
shut my mouth and plead 
your maledictions. Hut 
a cept the challenge, if yo 
your accusations out of s< 
mouials scattered over tl 
can you reconcile it to } 



ortho- 
Qnger 



id 



and set forth the presumption, danger 
and wickedness of men's trusting to 
their own merits for salvation, when 
all evangelical denominations as well 
as ourselves declare in their confes- 
sions of faith, resound from their pul- 
pits, inculcate in the tracts they cir- 
culate, the entire and exclusive trust 
in Christ's abounding and super- 



with the holding am 
erroneous and p 
Don't you preachei 
for poisoning the n 
audiences with thei 
injurious charges ai 
ren? Besides the i 
cuse'd, there is inju 



the 



sdulo 



eh; 



the preaching that is going on in the 
country teaches that we 1 are to be 
saved by our works: 1 This broad as- 
sertion 1 heard, not long since, from 
one of your pulpits. Now 1 will offer 
a challenge to your whole body, clergy 
and laity. The American Tract So- 
ciety, whose publications are put 
forth and sanctioned by a joint com- 



for our plans of getting money, and 
you expose to sne'ers the eager impor- 
tunities of our agents in obtaining it, 
Tt is quite likely that our agents have 
sometimes pushed their zeal too far 
and adopted methods of inducing peo- 
ple to give that were not 'prudent or 
beta -min?. But anything may be 
abused; find the abuse of a thing is no 
argument against its use. Tf the Apos- 
tle Paul enjoined upon the churches 



28 



ZION'i LANDMARK- 



to give for religious and charitable them forth as suitably prepared for 

purposes, if he thankfully acknowl- ministerial work. I now proceed to 

edged their contributions to his neces- meet the 1 objection to which the 

sit \ . while engaged in his missionary Length of my former article forbade 

work, that is sufficient warrant for us me then to reply. Had a veteran of 

to follow his example; and if we can the old school indulged in this injuri- 

induce the covetous world to appro- ens and unfounded accusation I would 

priate some of their wealth to the not have been surprised, for so in- 

cause of God, it is only like Israel veterate are 1 their prejudices and so 

spoiling the Egyptians with their own limited their means of knowledge that 

consenl iii order to use their gold and if one of your preachers were to tell 

jewels in the service of God. his hearers that after raising a large 

One of your heaviest objections sum of money under pretense of sup- 

aga'insl us is the use of theological porting missions we shared it anion-' 

schools and of human learning geher- ourselves for our own personal profit 

ally, in order to educate and qualify 1 am afraid they, the multitude, would 

ministers to preach the gospel. Any believe it to be a fact. Hut that a man 

person on reading your statement in Like you, bred up among us, having 

regard to this would be justified in be- full means of correct information. 

Lieving that we took young men with- should make such a statement and as- 

out grace and piety and expected, alter s is1 in misleading your people into the 

giving them ;; certain amount of bibli- adoption of such an opinion respecting 

cal learning to send them forth as us and our proceedings is marvelous, 

suitably 'prepared for ministerial work, and shows the danger of enrolling 

Hut 1 must defer my defense 1 on this yourself in the ranks of the great 

point for another article, lest my read- apostle of Kehukee'ism, Joshua Law- 

rrs should tire and drop tin; paper. rence, who made all his followers he- 

WILLIAM BOOPER. Lieve these devoted, self-sacrificing 



No 



gospel 



In my former article in replj to am! Baptist principles i 
your communication, 1 showed the in- were mercenary swindlers. Are you 
justice of your charge against us as not perfectly aware and must you not 
preaching and practicing the doctrine' candidly confess, my mistaken brother, 
of works as meritorious in obtaining that every one of these young men 
our salvation. 1 then noticed the only who go to the theological school is the 
two remaining charges which 1 thought member of a church which, previous 
it important to reply to, to wit: our to his admission, requires and receives 
activity in raising money and our satisfactory evidence of his piety; 
erection of theological seminaries as thai he gives to that church further 
an indispensable way of preparing confirmation of his piety and "apt- 
preachers for the work of the minis- ness to teach" by exercising his gifts' 
try, or, to use a term which would as a preacher before them and the 
fully express your idea, as so many public, that he professes before he 
manufactories of preachers. I said goes to the seminary and after he be- 
that any person reading (and relying comes a student, a ho'pe and persua- 
on) your statement with regard to'this sion that he is called of God to preach 
would be justified in believing that we the gospel, and that at every step of 
took young men without grace and his progress in the school he is ad- 
piety, after eriving them a certain monished that without piety and zeal 
amount of biblical learning we sent for God's glory and Christ's kingdom 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



2<> 



no mm is lit for the ministry nor can 
t'xp ct success in it, and that all ac- 
quisitions i)i learned languages and 
profound theology will be no better 
than "sounding brass or a tinkling 
c.Miibal" as a preparation for .convert- 
ing souls unless his own heart has 
bees eonverted, and is deeply affected 
with the truth and power of the doc- 
trines of the cross.' I say, are you 
not aware of this and can you deny it? 

It is quite possible that you may 
have seen and heard. Baptist preachers 
trained at theological schools who gave 
but poni- indications of pie'ty and zeal; 
but so you have, I imagine, seen or 
heard of such among the Old School 
churches, for T can hardly believe that 
they are so peculiarly fortunate as to 
have kept out all unworthy persons 
from their ministry. As there was a 
Judas among the twelve and as the 
apostles complain of many who "had 
a name to live while they were dead," 
who were "false apostles," who were 
• grievous wolves," who "privily crept 
in and brought in damnable doctrines" 
— if tins were 1 the case in the best of 
times, we have no reason to expect the 
church and the ministry would be free 
in modern times from some intruders 
into the ministry who would be use- 
less or even disgraceful to their vo- 
cation. But if such should spring up 
among us as the result of our tuition 
and course of preparation* you must 
acknowledge that it will be in spite of 
every precaution that human pru- 
dence, vigilance and care could put in 
•practice. 

But your objection does not stop at 
theological seminaries; your argument 
is that those whom God calls to the 
ministry he will fit for the work and 
furnish them with all requisite knowl- 
edge without human aid or pains, and 
that to suppose otherwise is a criminal 
distrust of God's ability to do without 
man's help, and even an impeachment 
of bis wisdom. 



How utterly weak and deceptive is 
your whole course of reasoning on this 
point may be easily shown and exposed 
to ridicule. Your argument proves too 
much and far more than you are 
aware of or would like to admit. If 
you object to the amount of knowl- 
edge we encourage and aim at on the 
ground that divine teaching super- 
cedes and repudiates it, on the same 
ground you must reject as unnecessary 
the plainest English education. If an 
unlettered boy who does not know a 
letter in the alphabet is converted and 
feels it his duty to preach the gospel, 
he may set about it forthwith. God 
will give all requisite light and knowl- 
edge. Bui suppose him to have learned 
to read his Bible, he need not^ and 

Bttudy commentaries to explain any 
difficulties; he must not apply to dic- 
tionaries to find the 1 meaning of words, 

marbles, take the text (as 1 heard 3 was 
once actually done) "marvel not"; if 
he reads "thou art an oyster man" in- 
stead of an "austere" man, and ex- 
plains in his sermon how the oyster 
man grabbles up the oysters from the 
bottom of the sea, or if he reads, in 
I he story of the prodigal son, that he 
spent all his substance in righteous 
living (as I once heard with my own 
ears), and should take it as a text 
against doing good works and wasting 
money upon missionaries, in none of 
these cases need he resort to any hu- 
man means of enlightenment. God 
will teach him all that is necessary, and 
these profound and ingenious interpre- 
tations of the sacred text are the real 
mind of the 1 Holy Ghost. 

But if you vindicate your young 
preacher for referring to Webster or 
Worcester for the meaning of "mar- 
vel," "austere," "'riotous " how can 
you forbid him to refer to his Hebrew 
or Greek dictionary to know the mean- 
ing of Messiah, anathema maranatha, 



30 



ZION'S LAND Vi / HK 



Mam i, Apolyon, Selah, and various papers. Suppose a zealous young 

other words which require learning to preacher Erom among you, knowing 
she'd light upon them. Where can you nothing .but his English Bible, should 
fix the line of demarkation up to which be impressed witH a deep and uncon- 
your uovice mus1 be instructed, but be- querable desire to preach Christ to the 1 
yond which it is unnecessary or even heathen in foreign lands. Suppose he 
offensive to God for him to proceed? should tell you that God had fitted 
The pious though ignoranl colored him with such a conviction that he 
preacher, whom you must admit into must go abroad, across the seas, in 
your pulpits as taught of God, is just order to obey the commission, "Go 
as well qualified according to your leach all nations,." go into all the 
principle's to instruct and enlighten a world and preach the gospel, etc.. that 
congregation as your white preachers. lie could not slay at home any longer. 
And yet I presume you yourself would that the warning ran-- in his ears right 
be staggered as to the soundness of and day, "Woe he unto thee if thou 
your theory if the good man were to preach not the gospel to the poor lost 
take for his text "Beware of dogs." heathen"; what would you do with 
and should construct a regular philip- such a young preacher? Von dare not 
•pic against the canine race, and sum try to dissipate his impressions and 
up the climax of horrors with a de- labor to satisfy his conscience by tell- 
scription of a man under the agonies ing him there' was plenty of work at 
of hydrophobia! You cannot, sir, on home. N'o, you would be obliged 1o 
your ground, escape the most ruinous admit that these noble, unselfish long- 
ami most ridiculous conclusions as the ings of soul bore I he impress of heaven 
legitimate sequences of your prin- and were the unmistakable sugges- 
ciples. tions of the Holy Spirit. You must 

1 have always noticed that the men then yield to them and prepare to send 

who take your ground and declare 1 him abroad, and sustain him for vears 

against learning think very well of in some heathen land, before he would 

learning till it rises up to their level, learn its language sufficiently to pro- 

but despise and condemn all learning claim to the people "in their own 

beyond their mark. T dare say you tongue the wonderful works of God." 

and your excellent white brethren in In order to accomplish this you must 

the ministry would laugh heartily at raise money to 'pay for his transpor- 

the supposed sermon of your colored tation to the field of his operations and 

brother in making Paul's language an then to maintain him there. He would 

exhortation to the Philip'pians to be- acquire the language with less ease 

ware of mad dogs : but ho could just and speed than an educated youn 

as consistently turn upon yon and man from one of our college's, expert 

say "much learning' had made you and practiced in the acquisition of 

mad" as you can charge us with* pre*- languages: yon will hardly say he 

sumptuous and ungodly dependence on would be miraculously assisted or even 

human erudition. endowed at once with the faculty of 

T do not care to write any more in "speaking with tongues." as in the 

pursuance of this controversy between primitive times. Yet T see' not why, 

us, for I can't hope it will lead to any according to your creed, you might 

change of opinion in either party, but not claim thai aid from fJod to effect 

T will, before concluding, ask von a his oAvn designs. You as Primitive 

fine'stion of which T should really be Baptisls. folloAv rigidly primitive prac- 

glad to see an answer from you in the tice, end ought therefore to expect 



ETON'S LANDMARK 



31 



primitive privileges. Do you not rind 
it written (Mark xvi.JV, 18): "These 
signs shall follow them that believe: 
In mv name shall they cast out devils; 



they shall i 
they shall t; 
must then e 
to defray tl 



•ak 



nh 



Yc 



! was learning 
(■Veiled his 



id 



L'lt 



How will your people bear this.' Will 
they not grumble and complain and 
accuse you of turning "Missionary 
Baptists?" 1 trow they will; ami in 
fact you will have come so near to the 
imitation of our principles and prac- 
tices that you will, 1 hope, begin to 
think. "We might as well fall back 
into the old ranks ami instead of split- 
ting up the great Baptisl family into 
these lamentable divisions ami eon- 
tending factions unite together in 'a 
strong pull, a long pull and a pull all 
together" to speed forward the trium- 
phal chariot of our common Lord." 

W. BOOPER. 
liiilsboro. X. ('.. August 12th. 

No. 3. 

I did think my last number would 
be my last address to you. for if we 
wiite until all we might say is exhaust- 
ed paper and alienee would fail. But 
I omitted some animadversions, due to 
your sharp insinuations against us and 
presumptions (Maims lor yourselves, 
which ought not to pass uncensured. 
You begin with saying. '"I write not 



■die' 



end 



arrogating any sup< 
ing anyone with in 
you will look over 



will see that there is a pretty high and 
offensive arrogation of superiority and 
a pretty confident assumption of the 
claim, "We are the people," etc. 
""Stand off for f am holier than thou." 
Your tone is often contemptuous. You 
call us without scruple '■Babylon," a 
name which sufficiently designates the 
incorrigible and accursed foe of God 
and his church. I will quote a speci- 
men of this freedom with which you 
become the accuser of your breathren : 
■■.Much power is claimed by your teach- 



th< 



cte 



of sin who exalts himself above all 
thai is called Q-od, silting in the tem- 
ple of God and showing himself that 
he is Cod. In popedom the power of 

pardoning sin is boldly assumed 
iniquity. In protectant denomina- 



nikl 



child 



Ye 



ems 



to me you are allied "to the man of 
sin" in various ways. You hold your 
trad, lions of men, you put yourselves 
in place of the Holy Spirit when you 
teach and better prepare men to 
preach, directing them where and how 
to go. When yon teach your mission- 
aries to place their dependence for 

suppori on yourselves it looks like 



ak'u 



fl- 



its 



opi 



and what less when you teach that if 
money enough be contributed you can 
evangel^ the world. For your fre- 
quent use of Hie "anxious seal " no 
apology is made that does not suppose 
some power in the preacher, time. 



that it is the means of procuring 
•new birth." etc. A great deal 
is is loose, rambling abuse, aceus- 
is of trusting entirely in the effi- 
of means and instrumentalities 
from and independent of the di- 
blessihg, and unwarranted by his 



32 



ZION'8 LANDMARK. 



command — a 


charg 




thing that \vt 


i writ. 


i or speak. -But the 


specific aecus 


ation 


of our allying our- 


selves with this ai 


it i-( hnst, t lie man 


of sin," argues a 




lessness of 


repro; 


ach against your 


brethren whii 


ih in( 




in the extren 


ie am 




conceit, of " 


superi 


ority" over all the 


Christian woi 
of a few hum 


•Id wl 


rich, in a little sect 


noranl but gl 


Ired | 


lersons, not only ig- 
»■ in their ignor.'nce, 


may well pr, 


itnes> 


the" pitj and the 


You expect 


to ex. 


„*ite against us much 


odium and C( 


• litem] 


pt by computing to 


us a belief 


in tin 


1 omnipotence of 


money, and 3 


•on k 


indly remind us of 


the scriptural 




lemnation of eovet- 






this the' part of a 


fair and tint 


hful { 


idversary? Money, 


of railroads, 
achieving the 


are al 
end 


rse conveyance, use 
1 equallj means ol 
ol propagating the 




vhen 
nto a 


you mount your 
car to go to preach 


you are trust 


ing t< 


") human age'ncy as 


much as if yo 


II eoll 


ected money to pay 


another minister's 


expenses to go to 




e on 


1 he same errand 


As to the a 


nxiou 


<: seat, 1 don't feel 


myself hound 


to (I 


efend it. for some 


of our most 




>us members disab- 


prove it. Bu 


t its 


use does not imply 


a belief in it 




sntial efficacy, but 


that it aids in 




•nt ra1 ing the atten- 


lion and tixii 


Ig tl) 




matter delivei 


•e'd fr 


om the puli>it. And 


it is just I.e. 




it begets in many 


young person 




animal excitement, 


mistaken for 


religi< 
bando 


m. that it is disap- 
ned. 


Your charg 


•e of 


covetousness is 


strange and i 




sable. AYas it eov- 


elousness in 1 


'aul v 


rhen he begged for 


the ' poor sah 




Jerusalem?" Was 


it covetousnes 




the same holy man 


when lie told 


Tit 


aothy to "charge 


them that are 


rich t 


0 be liberal in corn- 


municating f" 


Qui 


s' beggary is no 



more for selfish ends than Timothy's 
was. Yet you kindly alarm us with 
the admonition "Are not their (the 
apostles') terrible cautions against the 
love of money and making a gain of 
godliness enough to cause one to be- 
ware of covetousness? See, too, how 
pride is condemned, -pride' of intellect, 
whose great boast and most effective 
weapon is human learning that puffeth 
up." Here observe how little disc-rim- 

the possession of money with the crim- 
inal love' of it and the possession of 
learning with the pride that may ac- 
company it. It is no honor to lie rich 
but a great blessing from heaven if the 
possessor, like that noble man, Mr. 
Peabody, scatters his bounty all 
around him ; nor was the learning of 
Paul a disadvantage to him when he 

priate occasions and handle the deep 
and high arguments of the Scriptures 
with a power and skill beyond that of 
the unlettered fishermen. Pride is a 
bad and ugly thing wherever it ap- 
pears, but 1 am afraid that it can 
dwell and swell in the heart of an Old 
School Baptist while he. with much 
self-complacency, considers himself 
the special favorite of heaven and the 
favored depository of God's truth as 
well as it can on the bosom of a learned 
scholar. Excuse me when 1 tell you 
that your readers may. perhaps, de- 
tect a large infusion of it in the self- 
laudations of your essay. 

Your way of arguing about the ope- 
ration of God's spirit in effecting the 
conversion of men would exclude all 
means, oven the preaching of the sros- 
pel. You say: "Paul was directed by 
the spirit where to go because the Lord 
had people at such places. Preaching, 
then seems to be the appointed means, 
not of making sheep, but of feeding 
them after gathering them into the 
fold." 

There se'ems to be a strange want 



ZION'g LANDMARK. 



of clearness iu your ideas here. You 
seem to think that where Paul was 
called to go there- the disciples were 
already converted and he was only 
sent there to '"feed" them. Is it pos- 
sible that you have not observed that 
(led, by anticipation, calls those his 
people who are not yet converted but 
who-tn hr designs lo convert by the in- 
strumentality of preachingl Was not 
Paul warned of God not to be discour- 
aged by the opposition be met with at 
Corinth but to go on preaching, because 
God - had much people in that city" yet 

1o be converted by the sermons of 

Pan] ! Preaching the word, then, is 

tile instrument and means not of 

"making shegp," would 1 say, but of 
conveying saving truth to their souls. 
How was Lydia converted? Not with - 

oul means. God "opened her heart," 

not to communicate saving grace di- 
rectly to that heart, but to give heed 
lo the savin-- truth delivered by Pain, 
which truth was the medium and in- 
strument of converting her soul. 

There is a confusion of ideas, too, 
in what you say about man's free 
ageney. ■■One thing seems dear to 
me." you say, "thai the human will 
piever wants Christ and never comes 
to him/' 

Then no man comes to Christ wil- 
ling, but he comes unwilling! Does 
Cod draw men againsl their wills or 
does he "make them willing in the 
day of his power?" When a man 
comes to Christ does he not come with 
the lull concurrence of his will? Did 
he ever go to a feast or receive a sum 
of money more' willingly or heartily 
than lie accepts of Christ » Yes, God 
loveth a cheerful giver. He would not 
have ;i reluctant, grudging servant, 
lie openes the eyes and presents rea- 
sons to the poor blind sinner, who as 
soon as he sees the truth and considers 
the reasons, with the hearty consent 
of his w ill and affections, lie embraces 
Hie truth and is converted to God. 



Vet you 'prefer to illustrate it by the 
"ploughman" and "the plough,' as if 
(Jod took any delight in the passive 
obedience of a machine. 

As to Andrew Fuller and the Old 
School Baptists, 1 merely say, "13y 
their fruits shall ye know them." It 
is admitted that his writings ami his 
actions gave the first impulse to the 
grand modern movements tor the con- 
version of the world: that by those 
movements Hie wilderness and the soli- 
tary places have been made to blos- 
som as the rose; that the fold, lillh.y, 
stupid idolator has been turned into 
a pure, enlightened worshiper of the 
true God; the Cruel, bloody savage 
has been turned into a lamb, and the 
horrid yells ami orgies of heathen 
worship turned into the delightful 
songs of /ion poured forth from the 

barians. 

As to the Sunday schools, which is 
another conspicuous object of your 
dislike ; .nd condemnation, 1 have no 
space for their defense. Suffice ii to 
say that as long as Paul's words stand 
in the Testament, "Bring up your 
children in the nurture and the ad- 
monition of the Lord"— as long as 
young Timothy is snoke'n of as in- 
debted for his' godly character to Hie 
care and education of his mother and 
grandmother as long as the precept, 
"Train up a child in the way he should 
go," is obligatory, so long will Sunday 
school workers feel that tiny have 
Bible authoi Lty for their laudable ami 

WILLIAM HOOPER. 

TO DIC HOOPER. 

"Our preaching, so far as 1 know, 
is such as would be sanctioned by An- 
drew Puller, whose works have been 
a standard authority for Baptists, both 
in England and in' this country ever 
since they appeared." 

"We go by Bible precept. We work 



lilOli 'I LANDKAJMK. 



by Bible example. " 

My Dear Sir: — The above quota* 
tions you will reeoguize as your own. 
in the first letter you addressed to uie, 
that Andrew Fuller was your stand- 
ard authority in preaehing you plainly 
stated. Now you seem very fond of 
asserting the superior learning of your 
denomination. 1 freely own that your 
scholarship is far above mine. I honor 
you as a fine seholar, and should re- 
gret it indeed if no one knew any 
more than I do. Inasmueh as you stir- 
pass me so far in human learning, you 
can appreciate my reference to Web- 
sjter for determining the meaning of 
standard authority. He says author- 
ity means "that which is claimed to 
justify measures, opinions," etc. The 
word standard, he says, means "hav- 
ing a fixed or permanent value 1 ." Then 
you have Andrew Fuller as your fixed 
permanent power to justify and direct 
you in your opinions and practices, 
lie justifies you in your measures, and 
you state what is true when you af- 
firm that you are his followers. You 
arc distinguished as Missionary Bap- 
tists, and the first missionary society 
among Baptists seems to have been 
formed by him and others on the 2d 
of October, 1792. (See Fuller's 
Works, Vol. I, page 62.) My diffi- 
culty lies in reconciling the first quo- 
tation with the one made in your last 
series of articles to me, in which you 
say: "We go by Bible precept. We 
work by Bible example." Why, in 
your reply, did you desert your stand- 
ard authority and attempt to shelter 
yourself under the Bible, which from 
first to last I claim as my only author- 
ity? But another great wonder ap- 
pears. You attempt to drag all your 
doctrines along with you under cover 
of the Bible. Did you know that the 
word doctrines does not appear in the 
Bible except as held by men or devils? 
And T don't suppose it will own your 
doctrines so let them remain with your 



standard authority. You would foist 
Sunday schools on the 1 Bible. They 
are your nursery, from which you 
transplant what you call Christians 
into the church at proper age and 
When there are good seasons. You in- 
tend through the Sunday school to 
instill into the minds of these children 
your notions of benevolence, so that 
the next generation will more liberally 
support your measures. Now, does 
the Bible tell us what thing in nature 
is the nursery of the church.' A nurs- 
ery room in a house is designed for 
children which are as much members 
of the family as the parents. So in 
orchards the young trees in the nurs- 
ery are as much fruit trees in their 
nature as those already bearing fruit. 
Now. you call Sunday schools the 
nursery of the church. Your denomi- 
nation is exalting them into exceeding 
importance. Why have not the Apos- 
tles told us something of them? But 
you hint that they are in the Bible, be- 
cause Timothy is indebted to his 
mother for his godly character. I sup- 
pose Timothy is indebted to God for 
his godly character. You say his 

and education of his mother and 
grandmother, and that the Scriptures 
teach this. Now 1 cannot find where 
this is taught. It is said that Timothy's 
mother was a Jewess, and that the 
same faith he had dwelt in his gran l- 
tnother and in his mother before it did 
in him. but that they mads him a 
Christian is what I do not think is 
taught. Because it is che duty o 
parents to train up their children in 
the nurture and admonition of the 
Lord v::i sr.v Sunday schools are 
taught in Scripture. Parents should 
set good examples before their chil- 
dren and urge 1 upon them the study 
of the Bible, where the truth is found, 
and this should not be neglected. 
Barents should urge upon their chil- 
dren a becoming regard for the Lord*8 



Z ION'S BA'NDMAKK. 



day, hut that one person can grant an- 
other faith or a godly character is 
what I cannot admit. My objection 
to Sunday schools is, in part, because 
you claim too much for them. You ac- 
knowledge they are a modern institu- 
tion, not a hundred years old, yet you 
ai tempt to sanction them by the Bible. 
You give them an intimate connection 
with and make them an important part 
of the church when they are not so 
much as mentioned in the Bible. I be- 
de#e God's revelation is complete, and 
in the Bible all is found that is need- 
ful For the church. But your infer- 
ence is that this age of human learning- 
arid progress develops necessary ad 
ditio w to the church of which revela- 
fcfcii is sil. ni. h seems lo me that they 
arc dangerous, partly because much of 
the matter taught in them is fabulous 
and because children are deceived into 
the notion they are Christians when 
they ate not, and because you claim 
for this modern idol so much power 
and value. The true church has uo 
nursery from which she transplants, no 
teachers but such as the Holy Ghost 
prepares for their work, and the Bible 
thoroughly furnishes these unto all 
good works. 

Your reply on the question of beg- 
ging Eor money amounts to no more 
than an apology for it. You say some 
abuse it, and thence infer that it is 
right. If you had admitted that all 
abuse it and then renounced it we 
would be nearer together. If any 
measure is right in itself no one should 
obgeci to it because some one, Judas- 
like, betrays or perverts it. My ob- 
jection is for the thing itself, for I 
cannot see from Scripture your right 
to the high value you place on money 
in the conversion of souls. When 
some, Or many, of your number of ac- 
knowledged authority teach that it is 
not known how many souls one ten 
cents or one dollar will be the means 
of converting, some people feel like 



coming not into your secret nor being 
joined to your assemblies. When you 
teach that the heathen are perishing 
because we do »ot send the gospel to 
them, and that we will send it if you 
will but give us the money, you put 
forth that which contradicts the teach- 
ing that it is the Lord of the harvest 
and not man that sends laborers into 
his vineyard, and God and not money 
that saves souls. I do not think all 
the money in the world can save a soul, 
nor if there were not a cent of money 
in the world that the number of re- 
deemed would be a single soul dimin- 
ished. If money will convert the 
heathen in the sense you believe 1 
think your people very culpable, for 
you hardly average twenty-live cents 
a hCad in your contributions for this 
purpose, and that after much begging, 
when you ought to give all you have, 
if it be true that money will save their 
souls, for a soul is worth more than all 
the world. If you do not believe it will 
convert them why submit to this 
', riest-craft and dishonor the name of 
our Lord, who redeemed his church, 
QOtt with corruptible things, such as 
sil ver and gold, but with the precious 
blood of Christ, as of a lamb slain from 
before the foundation of the world? 

Let us see how you justify giving 
to convert the heathen by the precepts 
and examples of the Bible. You say 
"if the apostle Paul enjoined on the 
churches to give," etc., "'that is suf- 
ficient warrant for us to follow his ex- 
ample." and so say I. You go on, 
"and if we can induce the covetous 
world to apropriate some of its 
wealth." the inference is to promote 
the glory of God in giving money to 
convert heathens it is right, etc. 

Now how near does this statement 
correspond with Paul's case. It is 
stated in Acts, 9th chapter, beginning 
at the 27th verse, that there should 
be a great dearth throughout all the 
world. Then the disciples determined 



BION1 LANDMARK. 





1 relief unto the bret hron which 


his property to a brothe 






dwell 


in Judea. See also Romans 


a matter o 


[uestion w il l 


John : 


" 1 '» 1 1 1 


15th ( 




whoso hath 


tins world 


s gooc 




hath 


lie ised i In in of Macedonia and 


seeth his br 


)ther have a 


•('( ,111 


s m - 


1 




teth up his 




ipassio 


a rom 


tor i i 


n eain+e i. x - 1 , ", , . 1 , art* -it .l.M'il- 

pooj .-..iiiits wmcn aic ai ouu- 


how <.\ 


elleth the h 




10 m 


salem. 


I or 1 he met lod ^ o ^ | dls ^ u ^ 


m.' 1 j 


hn 2:17. 






this c< 




1 he Lord 


writes his 1 


iw of 


ove in 




mtn uition s^ee .^V^ r - ^g"^ 


his people 1 s 


minds and 


hearts 


and 




following verses Here we se'e 


hence they 


ind the bh 




of the 


tV't 1 




cheerful gn 


er in obeying thi 


law. 


tribal 


' "i - ' "t h ^ 'i 't si ief of* t he P ' )oor 


(iod s peopl 


3 are made 


hones 


. ^ and 


sa ml s 


in a famine F^om this case you 


th< 3 ai i not 


willing tha 


true 1 








ers snonid 


e' faithful in 


feedin 


tb^ 


1)V V( 


1 ' in issim'n v^h ^rds first^or 


and ministe 


•inti- to them 




u ritual 


: l.i ii. /i 


1 in 1792 for converting the 


things, witl 






ich la- 




"■iT' VTm- 't' tne C( >vet- 


borers any 


)f their tei 




niniLs. 


(MIS \\ 


)r ( <> secure i . ovi nine is 


1 hey need n 


ot. therefore 


be be* 






kc l>ihle prcci'pt and example. 


make these 


gifts. True 


preach 


'is aie 


As nn 


eh as sending money to suffer- 


equally deli 


vered from 


coveh 


1ISIU ss, 






and preach 


.f a ready w 


ind, ne 




■ ng ] >! 


' ' ' sr ml ill '<>• aoneY convert 


tnanamg sa 


aries nor \ 


vishino 


to be 


heathi 


ns as much as the free offerings 


bui densome. 


How mucl 


wlial 


1 have 


of ( !h 


istians which are acceptable to 




• the Bible judge fo 


j oui - 




re Like spoiling the Egyptians or 


self. How i 


inch it is 1.1 


like 111 


■ prac- 




ns world. 




denomination 


i you c 


in also 




did yon no! give your Bible 


Judge. ' 1 lh 


nk it well 1 




Ohrjs- 


preeei 


is and Bible example for raising 


tians to obs 


erve this a 


3 well 


as all 




to convert souls? It seems to 


other eomm 


mils of Oil 


r Lord 


. But 



ii pervert the plain com- my difficulty is in seeing any scriptural 

ve money, not for the pur- warrant for you;- high modern pretcn- 

i verting souls, but to feed sions in regard 1o the power of money, 

the bodie's of Christian la- One would supose from reading 

sufferers, into pretexts for your article on the fruits of Mr. Ful- 

o support men in attempt- ler's Mission system that India, China, 

mt which man is unable to etc.. are blossoming as the garden of 

he addresses in the Epistles the Lord. So, perhaps, you would 

nt to unbelievers but to represent these United State's as bloom- 

and this should not bo 1 ing for the millennium. This is about 

As to giving and reeeiv- as conclusive as saying that because 

■iptures teach that he that unfeigned faith first dwelt in Timo- 

spiritual things should be thy's grandmother and then in his 

to in temporal things by mother that therefore Timothy is in- 

re taught in the word, for dehto'd to his mother for religion, and 

ath the Lord ordained that hence Sunday sehools can he justified 

preach the gospel should by the Scriptures. Or that because it 

yospel." 1 Cor. 9:14. Paul is the dutv of parents to bring up their 

ts from churches and com- children in the nurture and admonition 

ir liberality. How one can of the Lord therefore modern Sunday 

e of Cod in him and refuse schools not a. hundred ye'nrs old. teaeh- 



ZI0N1 LANDMARK. if 37 



ing fables and doctrines of men, are 
found in the Bible. You are replying 
to me though because, as you say, my 
arguments are inconclusive. 

Ymi complain much of the bitterness 
of my article. My convictions were 
stated in as mild a manner as 1 well 
eould express them. If my charges are 
true (and you have not denied many of 
them), you had better try to correct 
the evils pointed out rather than blame 
me for doing what you asked me to do. 
1 liad not intended to write anything 
about this matter, but you called on 
mo in such a manner that 1 did uot feel 
that ! could well decline doing so. I 
have .a high regard for many of your 
brethren and. besides, it is not pleasant 
to me tc offend anyone, nor do 1 like 
to ineur the odium that results from 
publishing what is so unpopular, yet 
under such circumstances shall 1 with- 
hold what s.-ems to me to be truth to 
please men 

As to your allusions to our ignor- 
ance and fewness of numbers, judging 
from you!- manner of writing about it, 
perhaps no one glories more than you 
do that we are few in number and ig- 
norant in worldly wisdom. The Lord's 
people were more numerous at one 
time than the prohet Elijah thought 
when the Lord told him he had a re- 
serve of seven thousand, all the knees 
of which had not bowed to Baal. 1 
Kings six. The Scriptures tell us 
'■'straight is the gate and narrow is 
the way which leadeth unto life, and 
few there be that, find it." Matt. 
\ ii:14. ll is not so bad to be ignorant, 
either, when -lesiis says "J thank thee, 
O Father, bind of heaven and earth, 
because thou hast hid these things 
from the wise and prudent, and hast 
revealed them ante babes." Matt, 
xi :25. And again, "For you see your 
calling, brethren, how that not many 
wise men after the flesh, not many 
mighty, not many noble are called. 
Bui Cod hath chosen the foolish 



things of the world to coni'ound the 
wise, and God hath chosen the weak 
things of the world to confound the 
things which are mighty. And base 



things 


of the world and things which 


are despised hath Cod chosen; yea and 


things^ 


which are 1 not to bring to 




things that are. That no rlesh 


shall g 
1 :26-29 


lory in hi;; presence." 1 Cor. 


I ust e 


ad oi glorying in my ignorance 


Or feel 


Lag that I am better than 


ner^an 


1 am a corrupt, miserable sin- 




d cannot hope for salvation ex- 


cept bj 


grace. Par be it from me to 


sa\ Li 


il I am better than others. 1 


am Ire 


e to say that the pride and 


vanity 


and other corruptions of poor 


and sh; 


nature affile! me to my grief 


on 


line. 

consider me extremely impu- 


dell! \\ 


hen 1 state that it seems to me 


3 ou an 


allied to Babylon in some re- 


spects. 


. k " mv - 1 suppose, that 
n is from babel, which means 


': v 

con usi 


on. do not know a denomina 


ion : 


at exhibits a greater confusion 


of tonj 


rues than the Missionary Bap- 


tists 


Your articles to me are good 


p i 00 s 


0j it. Here you ascribe salva- 


lion to 


grace, there you say Timothy's 


godly 


character is from his mother. 


At one 


time you say all Christian dis- 


posit ioi 


is are implanted by God, then, 


again. 


the human will comes to Christ. 


. o mu< 


di is this the character of your 


reply t 


hat I felt like trying to show 


how ui 




are alt 


bough, of course, you appeal to 


them i 


'or confirmation of your position. 


The' t\\ 


<i texts at the head of this ar- 


tide, v 


phich you enunciate as true of 


you, 1 


shall utterly fail to reconcile. 


You r ( 


imind me of one who, being 


chastis. 


^d for his wrong doing, corn- 


plains : 


sorely of the severity of the cas- 




l yet clings to his old ways. 


Vnll 


suppose a case which you say 



it would gratify you if I would give 
my opinion on. Tt is that of a poor 



ETON'S LANDMARK 



young man who says he has an unmis- 
takable impression that lie ought to 
preach to the heathen. How shall he 

such impressions and prepare himself 
for it. according to your method, and 
after receiving the benediction of his 
teachers some difficulty should bo in- 
terposed and he should quietly settle 
down in this country. What would 
you say? Docs the Lord call one to 
go to the heathen and then blockade 
his way so that he can have no access 
to them, or does he suffer such ob- 
stacles to check his way? T should 
conclude the Lord had not called him. 

Therefore some other proof that he 
is calle'd to go to the heathen than his 
mere assertion that he is might be 

The God whom I wish to worship is 
of one mind, and when he bids Jonah 
go In heathen Ninevah the way seems 

up and quite stormy if he' attempts to 
go any other way. It is more difficult, 
it seems, to get Jonah willing to go 
to Ninevah than it is to get him a con- 
veyance. 

Now suppose this young man comes 
to the church, as you say. Let us look 
into the Scriptures, which thoroughly 
furnish the man of God unto all good 
works. This you cannot object to, ac- 
cording to one of your texts: "We 
go by Bible' prceept. We work by 
Bible example." The young man 
must sro, but according to your suppo- 
sition he will be speechless when he 
pets there for he knows not their lan- 
guage. We believe those' whom the 
Lord calls to preach he makes apt to 
teach. Paul exhorts those having the 
trift of tongues not to speak in an un- 
known tongue, which is profitless. 
Those that are to preach for you are 
put in your hand to prepare 1 them 
more fully for their work. Did you 
show me from Scripture where the 
Lord authorizes any school of man to. 



lit men to preach: Our (Jod knows 
the end from the beginning, has fore- 
seen all exigencies, has provided all 
that is useful for the church in all her 
necessities and revealed it in Scrip- 
ture, and forbids her resorting to any- 
thin- except, what he lias shown in the 
mount, yet he has given us no account 
of any school of man to better prepare 
one to preach the gospel to anyone. 

Your schools, after all, do not teach 
these foreign tongues, and one leaving 
them with diplomas in his pocket 
knows no more of the Chinese lan- 
guage than r do. The Lord calls a 
man of human Learning to preach 
when it pleases him, but that man 
never glories in human learning. You, 
for instance, state '"that human learn- 
ing enabled Paul to handle the deep 
and high arguments of the Scriptures 
with a power and skill beyond that 
of the unlettered fishermen." Here 
you expressly state that human learn- 
ing gives light on revelation or better 
enables Paul to handle the deep things 
of Scripture than Peter and the other 
disciples could. Well what does Peter 
say about the deep mysteries Paul has 
written? "Even as our beloved 
brother Paul also, according to the 
wisdom griven unto him, hath written 
Unto you." 2 Peter iii:15, 16. Here 
Peter tells us that Paul wrote, not ac- 
cording to the wisdom acquired in the 
schools, but according to the wisdom 
Given him from above. Let us hear 
Paul on this question. "And my speech 
and my 'preaching was not with en- 
ticing words of man s wisdom but in 
demonstration of the Snirit and of 
power." 1 To,-. 2d chapter, ifli verse; 
read the whole chapter. Let us hear 
•Tames, who tells us where to go for 
wisdom if we have it not: "If any of 
you lack wisdom let him ask God that 
giveth to all ("men) liberally and up- 
braideth not. and it shall be eriven to 
him." James 1:15. Put is he not to 
study" Yes. study the Scriptures and 



K10N1 LANDMARK. 



39 



beeeftve know ledge t 


hal is worth any- Ly, there js m 


> muci) 


, that to me is ob- 


Ihmg trom \\ a eyei 


(lU j' U n 1 . COHl to lucre no n 




r leaching, ihat 


fcfrui does the .Lord : 


sen an) man. uux as 10 t 






preach wlio is not of 






ns man who is im 




8 v oi" sup josc ^he pressed Jo* go 




s ueatnen. lie is 


a ends°a man to re 


aeh wlio does not poor, and u 


ie qu 




Kiiuw the difference 


between an oyster- comes up. 1 




eonsmt the stand- 




1,-re man! When aid autnoflt) 


the 




he sends one i thin! 


k he does not call lells us el bo 




id combianuons 01 


riotous living by the 


name oi' righteous men, lor rais 







It seems to me that when yi 
discussing a question as import, 
that of a call and qualification 

Christ, thai when you can do no 

ridicule as you did, Li betrays 



Bible teaching, thai preaching is a gilt word ot such things is found there, 
of the Holy Spirit, as to hint that if One turns to you and asks where this 
one has that gift and is aol perfected system of converting heathens came 
ill the schools of human learning he from? You tell hi mthat your stand- 
would make the ridiculous mistakes authority, Andrew Fuller, originated 
yon are stating, only shows your high it aboul one hundred years ago. and, 
estimate of human learning in fitting "it is admitted that Ins writings and 
one to preach, and also what you sup- his actions gave the first impulse to 
pose preaching would lie without the the grand modern movement for the 
learning of tin; theological schools. conversion of the world: thai by 
I mighl as well here remark, that those movements the wilderness anil 
since you complain that 1 have wil- the solitary place have been made to 
fully made a false statement as to the blossom as the rose." etc. The en- 
kind of young men you sent to your quirer says. Jesus we know, and Paul 
theological schools—^ that is, that if <&ae we know', but who is Andrew Fuller.' 
should rely on your statement— he Von reply, () "he is our standard au- 
wonld conclude that you take young thority, in preaching, both in this 
men that do not profess to have grace Country and England, and has been 
and after giving them a certain ever since his work appeared." 
amount of biblical training, you send By the way, in your last articles, 
them out to preach: If you will ex- why did yon not refer more to your 
amine my article you will see. that standard authority, Mr. Fuller? Weak 
after some general discu-sion of that as yon acknowledge my article to be, 
question, I make this statement: "But if it had the effect in any sense of 
you say after one is certainly called to turning you to the Bible, please read 
preach, can not the schools polish this one carefully, and perhaps yon 
him." etc. I know not how to make will begin 1o think that your depart- 
a fairer statement than that one. If nre from the Bible to follow Andrew 
I were disposed to state matters false- Fuller, in his cunningly devised fables 



40 



BION1 LANDMARK. 



has brought such sad and lamentable miracles speak until there is a new 
divisions into the Baptist ranks, that dispensation. Just as a foundation 
it would be much better to go back to oner being laid for a house, remains 
the old landmarks, and abide stead- while there is a house on it. So the 
lastly in the apostles' doctrine and Scriptures are introduced and found- 
ways, where you would be sure of find- ed on miracles, and but one i'ounda- 
ing peace and fellowship with the tion is needed. Every new dispensa- 
whole household of faith. tion must rest on a foundation suffic- 
How then, shall the young man go tent to uphold its claims. The mirac- 
to the heathen, it he is not sent? 1 les that attest the Scriptures to be of 
say he must be sent, hut who semis God, and the twelve apostles to be- 
him.' Jesus says. "All power is given sent in the name of Christ, are as suf- 
unto me in heaven and earth. Go ye, indent proof today of the divine auth- 
therefore, and teaeh all nations, bap- ority of the Scriptures and the di- 
tising them in the name of the Father, vine commission of the apostles, as 
and of the Son. and of the Holy Ghost, they were on the day of their per- 
Teaching them to observe all things formance. A new dispensation would 
whatsoever I have commanded you, have to he sustained by miracles, lint 
and lo I am with you always, even uii- when the dispensation is once estab- 
to the end of the world." .Matt. 28:- lished on miracles properly authenti- 
18-20. If Jesus has all power, in cated, no more miracles are demanded 
heaven and earth, no man, nor combi- to support it. The gift of tongues was 
nation of men, has any 'power to send a sign in the days of the apostles, but 
men to preach to any one. lie never this was a sign to Hie unclean or un- 
says to any one, he can send some- believers, and to speak in a known 
body els^. lie commands the person t«ngue was better than lo speak in an 
lo go himself. When he impresses one unknown one. In the gospel now, 
or sends him. he will go with him unto every subject of the kingdom of Christ 
the end of the way. Do you not sup- has had the miracle of grace per- 
pose he will provide some way for formed on him. of having his I'eet 
him.' "And he said unto them, when taken out of the mire ami clay, and 
I sent you without purse or scrip and put upon a rock, and a new tongeu 
shoes, lacked ye any thing? And they given him with which he makes his 
and they said, nothing." Luke 22:35. confession unto salvation. He also can 
"Seek ye first the kingdom of God handle serpents and not be hurt, in 
and his righteousness, and all these the sense that, "the sucking child 
things shall be added unto yon." Matt, shall play on the hole of the asp. and 
li :33. But, you say, these' were days the weaned child shall lay his hand on 
of miracles, and such days have pass- the cockatrice's den." Isaiah 11:8. 
ed, which amounts to about this: these Because I insist Unit the Bible is of 
are Bible cases, and therefore they are as full and binding force now as it 
out of fashion now. Is not the Lord ever was, is therefore no reason why 
the same Lord now, that he was then? you should require a performance of 
Do not the' same miracles, that gave miracles by him who comes in the 
divine proof to the Scriptures then, name of Christ, What did the apos- 
still suport and sanction the 1 Scrip- ties enjoin on those they taught? Was 
lures to us as the same word of God, it to work miracles? No. It was to 
just as true and mighty now as then? contend earnestly for the Eaith once 
But why do we not have miracles now, delivered to the saints. Jude, 3rd 
as there were then? Because 1 those verse. "Behold, when I gave all dili- 



ZION'S T'hVNDiM ARK. 



41 



gence to write unto yo i of the com- find one singly sentence in any of the 

mop salvation, ii was needful for me publications of any of the lour ortho- 

should earnestly contend for the Eaith which denominations are Methodists^ 
which was once delivered unto the Presbyterians, Episcopalians and .Mis- 
saints. Sec II Tim. 3:14-17; also I sionary Baptists, -as you say. That is, 
Tim. 4:16, ••Take heed unto thyself, you affirm, thai they are all sound 
and unto the doctrine, continue in and true, holding the gospel, and you 
tlicm; for in doing this thou shall both endorse all thai they publish and defy 
save thyself and them thai hear any one to show that any one of them 
thee." What shall he done with those has put forth one sentence thai teach- 
that come contrary to the doctrine of es salvation by works. You agree to 
Christ? See Horn. U :17. "Now 1 shut your mouth if it can he shown 
beseech you brethren, mark I hem that liny one of them has ever done 
which cause divisions and offences this. You thus link yourself with 
contrary to the doctrine which ye them, and are to he regarded as en- 
have lea mod, and a void t hem. " Again, dorsing them. Let us take up the 
see II John 10-11 verses. "It' there Methodists. [n their creed, which 
come any unto you and bring not this oughl to teach what they believe, and 
doctrine, receive him not into your u ip •-» tl es, one <•: :i find the teach 
house, neither bid him God speed. For ing. thai a christian, one truly born of 
he that biddeth him God speed is par- God, can fall from grace and be for- 
taker of his evil deeds." Then when ever lost. If that be true, his salva- 
oue Gome's to us the question is nut, tion depends on his works of some 
can he work a miracle, but it is this: sort, and they ought to be good. He 
Docs he bring the true doctrine, the must, according to that teaching, ketep 
doctrine of Christ .' If he does not. we himself from falling by good works, 
are not so much as to receive him into and if he can fall away and be lost, 



quire of your young man ir he brings iug this doctrine, can we receive him 

the true doctrine, Iho gospel of Christ, into our house as one bringing the doo- 

which is tin- power of Cod unto salva- trine of Christ? T say not. Well, ' 

tion. your Presbyterian brethren hold to the 

I should rejoice to see me gospel practice 1 of infant s-nrinkling for bap 

preached to the heathen in all lands; tism and further hold, that it is the 

but my trouble' is, that the men you door by which children are introduced 

send there do not preach it. Preach- into the covenant of grace. This 

ing the gospel is such a dispensation seems" like works puts them in the way 

that one man cannot commit it to an- of being saved, and much as T respect 

"!bm\ nor restrain him from preach- all these' people, as people, T can not 

ing. AVoc is me if 1 preach not the see how they are teaching all things 

gospel, is its impelling power. commanded. Do you endorse their 

Do you bring that doctrine? Let sprinkling for baptism? You say that 

un consider the company you keep it ; s not ps«-ential to salvation. We say 

and judge from that. You lay clown it is essential in order to abide stead- 



Old Baptists, to fastly in the apostle's' doctrine and f el- 



42 



HON1 LANDMARK. 



lowship. Take 
teach that whc 



birth, 
to be 



this 
they 



I 



iave a domination 

performing work 
clear that one can 
t regeneration, am 
es1 procures it, s< 
ol call the acl o 



all. Hu 



111! 



hold that spurious Ihiug, sprinkling, 
for baptism, and claim that it can do 
so muck more 1 than scriptural baptism 
can. that it seems dangerous and 
shocking enough to me. If your young 
man comes endorsing this doctrine, or 
those tkat do endorse it, "neither re- 
ceive him into your house nor bid him 
God spCed." 

As to your own denomination, it 
presents a creed which seems to put 
things together, which are separated. 
You say, "you hold a doctrine of elec- 
tion not inconsistent with man's free 
agency;" that is grace 1 that is depend- 
ent on works — man is dead in sins, yet 
can hear the gospel — his carnal mind 
is enmity to Clod, and can not be sub- 
ject to his law, and yet that same 
mind or will comes to Christ. 

You objeel lo my statement, lhat 
nan's will (the carnal mind) never 
comes to Christ or wants him by say- 
ing that then no man ever comes to 
Christ "willing." Do you suppose it 
is the same will which comes to Christ 
that he speaks of, "And ye will not 
come* lo me that ye might have life." 
John v: 50. By your reasoning, it is 
the same will that comes to him, that 
will not come — no change in the man — 
no now birth. When it is said, "As 
many as received Christ, to them gave 
he power to become the sons of Cod 
oven to them that believe on his name, 
which were born, not of blood, nor of 



the will of the 1 
man, but 



Mi- 



nor of the will of 
.John i:12-13. If 



uj>i 



Ilia 



ill 



ian 



;ed lo Christ, I could 
Paul tells us in 
!o then il is not of him 
of him thai runneth, 
hut of God that showeth mercy." 
Does the sinner then come to Christ 



that 



iilii 



hat I 



said 1 1 n 1 <> thee, ye must he horn again." 
John iii:7. Cod gives his people a new 
will, that desires lo come to Christ— 
that hungers for him and thirsts for 
him. "Thy people shall be willing in 
the day of thy power." Psalms cx:3. 
David knew a corrupt will, and de- 
praved affection did not, could not, 
desire Christ. Therefore he says, 
"Create in me a clean heart, O God, 
and renew a right spiril within me." 
Psalms 51: 10. Do you say there is 



chr 



Ah. 



to 



al i 



nothii 



bul 



of < 



doll 



die "Who- 
not commit 
sin. for his seed remaineth in him and 
he cannot sin, be'oauso he is born of 
God." I John iii: 17. The smirit of 
a christian is willing, hut in the flesh 
dwelleth no good thing, while there is 
in the christian a mind to serve God, 
or willi the mind he serve-, the law of 
God. So rl Rom. vii: 15-25. The chris- 
tian, Ihen. has a mind to serve Cod, 
hut it does not come from the flesh, 
for that serves the law of sin, but it 
comes from God. "For it is God 
which worketh in yon hoth to will and 
to do of his good pleasure." Phil, ii : 
13. They are renewed in the spirit of 
their mind. 

You state that man is dead in sins. 
— Well if he is dead why are. some 
quickened and not others? You say 
God saves some of sovereign electing 
love, and strives by law and gospel 
to save 1 others: but not overcoming 
their opposition, leaves them to perish. 
&c. What is it that saves some and 



HON* LANDMABK. 



43 



does not save others, if all are equally 
dead? Would not the power that 
quickens one sinner and raises him, 
quicken another' Do you mean that 
the same power of law and gospel, that 
strives with some and fails to overcome 
them, is the same power that saves oth- 
ers.' Do you indeed believe the 1 Lord 
strives to quicken a man and fails? 
If you strive U do a tiling it is good 
proof that « ou \\ ish to do it, and would 
if you could. Is man stronger than the 
Lord, and dees ho defeat the Lord? The 
Scriptures leach, "thai the Son quick- 
cneth whom he will." John v. 21. 

The Father gives them to Jesus, and 
il is not his will that one of them 
should perish. It. is the spirit lhat 
quickeneth, and not law nor gospel, i 
do not think the law is ever spiritually 
applied, in its killing power, except to 
God's ek-vt : nor the i'ullness of the gos- 
pel ever revealed except to those slain 
by this powerful application of the law. 
Who hey ins salvation the spirit or the 
sinner.' Do you say the Lord docs. 
Then if the Lord begins it, will he not 
continue it. unto completion? "Be- 
ing confident of this very thing, that he 
which hath begun a good work in you, 
will perform it until the day of Jesus 
Christ. Phil, i: 6. In whom does he 
begin and perform this work? God 
hath from the beginning chosen you to 
salvation, through sanctification of the 1 
Spirit and belief of the truth." If. 
Thes. ii. 13. Again, "According to his 
own purpose and grace which was giv- 
en in Christ Jesus before the world 
began." II Tim. i..9. "According as 
he hath chosen us in him before the 
foundation of the world, that we 
should be holy and without, blame be- 
fore him in Love." Eph. i. 4. 

Then God chose every one of his peo- 
ple in Christ before the foundation of 
the world. "But, of Him, (God) are 
fe in Chrisl Jesus, who of God is m.i.D 
unto us wisdom and righteousness, and 

sanctification, and redemption." 1 



Cor. 1:30. Upon what foreseen good 
work can one be chosen? Oh, but you 
say, you believe this doctrine of elec- 
tion, as much as 1 do, and your people 
rejoice in it as much as 1 do. Well, I 
earnestly sought such people, while 1 
was with you, and heartily wish 1 could 
have found them. Here and there 1 
found some, but they were greatly in. 
the minority. Those that 1 found com 
plained bitterly of the general preach- 
ing of your denomination, as being rot- 
ten and void of comfort to them. How 

to you, from two reasons: One is you 

lities." If it is so good how can you 
have too much of it, and if it be so good 
how can it be dangerous; Secondly, 
you say you believe in election as much 
as we do, yet you impose on it thai 
which if true, would elog and quite 
annul it. Instead of preaching election, 
you wish for something else to be' 
preached and if something else be 
preached it is in contradiction to elec- 
tion. The gospel is, yea, yea, and not 
yea and nay. We do not know that 
the apostles preached but one gospel, 
and if you come preaching any other 
doctrine, or if your young man should 
come preaching any doctrine, but the 
doctrine of Christ, we should not re- 
ceive him. 
It is about as hard to reconcile grace 
and works, predestination and free 
agency to each other, as it is to recon- 
cile your two texts. 

You say that the great difference 1 be- 
tween us is, that you hold to the use of 
human means and instrumentalities in 
carrying into effect Cod's purpos*-s, 
while we do not. Then in a few S( n- 
fence's you state the strange position^ 
that God implants in man's heart all 
the impressions that lead to these hu- 
man efforts. That is like you/ creed 
that holds an election consistent with 
man's free agency. Now for me to 
reconcile these conflicting statements, 



44 



eiOM'I LANDMAB9L 



aud your standard authority v/ith the sweet mysteries of grace, strengthem$|j! 



Bible, is a task too 
Lieve that you will 
Jni nun efforts oi' co 
uot of the Bible, bi 
you to attempt to 
yourself under cover 



of religion, but 
from the word 



to me that the Bit 
that it requires o 



the Bible, whic 



leading to it, in his mind. Is it not 
true that when the Lord implants any 
impression on a man's mind and causes 
him to carry it out, the conduct result- 
ing from it will be in accord and har- 
mony with Cod's revealed will in the 1 
Bible? Paul says, ''If any preach any 
other gospel unto you than that ye 
have received, let him be accursed.'' 
Gal. i: 9. When christians are exhort- 
ed to work out their own salvation with 
fear and trembling, it is "because God 
works in them both to will and to do 
of his own good pleasure. "Here, then, 
God 'works in his people, both to will 
and to do, and not of their wills nor 
according to their minds, but of his own 
good pleasure. J agree with you, that 
herein a great difference does lie be- 
tween us. It seems to me, nothing Can 



Christ to the sain 
him, enabling bin 
working faith in 



Ins feeble spirit, and giving him liberty 
in the Lord 1 . Any religion that is not 
oi the Holy Spirit is a form of godliness 
at best, but a denying of the power 
thereof. Unless one abide in Christ he 
brings forth no fruit thai remains. If 
we abide in him, the beloved eats his 

[f your young man come bringing not 
this dot trine, how shall we receive' him .' 
The Lord's name is called on by all his 
people. 1 agree with you, that by anti- 
cipation or election, "the Lord calls a 
people that are yet in their sins, for I 
do not think he calls any other sort. 

to theim This gospel is foolishness to 
the Greeks and' a stumbling block to 
the -lews; hut unto them that are call- 
ed, both Jens and Greeks, Christ, the 
wisdom of God and the power of God. 



de 



>mes to them (by preach- 
»ns1 rat ion of t he Spirit and 
the Hoh Ghosl and much 



Chris! has all power and semis his 
reaches. The Holy Ghost goes with 
hem. and applies the word and waters 

ami seals the heir of salvation. The 
•onl is mixed with faith in them that 
ear, and with the heart they believe 
Qto righteousness. When the apostles 
, in forth preaching to tin; Gentiles, 
as mairv as were ordained to eternal 
fe believed." Acts xiii: 48. Haters 
f ele< i imi would have it, as many as 
elieved were ordained to eternal life 
ecaiise it was foreseen that they would 
elieve. No1 so. it seems to me. The 
iord had set them apart to salvation 
efore the foundation of the world, and 
ow sent his angels, the preachers, to 
ather them into the gospel net. So to 
ie end of time, he sends his preachers 
» -ather his people into the fold. By 
at lire they are dead in sins. The 
piril quickens them. Then they are 
efcdy l<> omish and the great gospel 

iimpol i i lil wn. and Aey that are 



45 



bendy to perish shall come. Tuesday, 8 — Helena. 

) our impression, 1 believe, is that Wednesday, L> — Flat River, 

ihe word, or letter of the gospel, eon- Thursday, 10 — Roxboro and at nigh!, 

vcys the Holy Spirit, while I tniak the Friday, 11— Stories Creek, 

bpirit carries the word. The word is Saturday and 2nd Sun.— Whe'elers. 

tailed the sword of the Spirit. Now .Monday' after -Prospect Hill, 

does man wield his sword or does the Tuesday— Lynch 's Creek, 

sword wield the man.' You say man Wednesday — Harmony, 

controls his sword. Then does not the Thursday— MeCrays. 

Holy Spirit control the sword which is Friday- Cilliams. 

the word of Cod.' "And the sword Saturday and 3rd Sunday Burliug- 

0 ot llif Spirit which is the word of ton. 

God." Bph. vi:17. The Spirit knows W ill be dependent for conveyance. 

the mind of Cod and applies the word 

rightly. That Spirit is in the Lord's K. E. ADAMS. 

'people, and abides with them forever 

and guides them into all truth. Now do Saturday and 2nd Sunday— Wheel 

you not think that his company ami ers. (Dec.) 

guidance will effectually direct all the Monday— Prospect Hill. 

Lord's preachers when he sends them Tuesday -Lynches Creek. 

to the heathen'.' Wednesday - -Arbor. 

P. I). COld). Thursday— P^kasant Grove. 

Friday — New Hope. 

MOORE'S MINERAL SPKIXCS. Saturday and 3rd Sunday— Montir 

cello. 

Last summer my health became Monday at noon- Cilliams. 

very poor. I went to .Moore's Miner- Tuesday — MeCrays. 

al Springs, in Stokes County, N. C. Wednesday- Harmony, 

remaining there .-bout 12 days. I re- L. II. HARDY, 

turned home well. 

This water acts on tin; blood, the ELDER SAMUEL MeMILLAN. 

skin, the bowels, kidneys, slomach. 

catarrh, &c. Wadesboro- -Dee. S and al uight. 

I gladly recommend this water to Lawyer's Spring- !). 

Hie sick. ' Hotel ope}) winter and sum- Jerusalem— 10. 

mer. Water shipped from Rural Mall, Watson 11. 

N. C, at $1.50 per case of 12 half gal I'leasant drove 12 and 1:1. 



to be returned in 30 Wingate 13 at night. 

High Hill 14. 
P. D. |30LD. 



ELDER 1'. W. WILLI AKD. 



ELDER B. F MeKINNEY. 



Lick Fork- -1st. Sunday in Dee 

Tuesday, Dec. 1. Fno, 11 o'clock. Will need conveyance while off Ihc 

Wednesday 2— Ross. railroad. 

Thursday 3— Dutchville and a> — 

night. Stem, N. C. ELfE J. W. WILLIAMS, COL. 

Saturday and 1st San. -Tar River Durham. Dec. 14— al uight. 

Monday, Dee. 7— Surls. Mill Grove— 15. 



46 



KI0N1 ULNBMAKK 



Piue Hill— 16. 

White Oak Grove — 17. 

Greensboro 17, — at. night. 

Philippi— 18. 

New Center — 19. 

Daubury— 20. 

Reidsvilh — 20 at night. 



MOSES DEW. 

This brother was born in April the 
12th, L838, in whal was then Edge- 
combe County, N. ('.. but is now Wil- 
son County. N. C, ami has resided 
here all Ins life, and departed from 
this life Oct. S, 1914. lie was twice 
married, and raised a family. His 
present wife is a member of the 
church at Wilson. \. C. Brother Dew 
was a member here more than 25 

His father, Larry Dew, was long a 
member here and Nancy Dew his 
mother. They were well known and 
highly estee'med Primitive Baptists, 
and the family was famous as devoted 
chur< h members. Brother Dew was a 
true and faithful member, and prom-pt 
in his duties and obligations, lie was 
social and cheerful, and had the re- 
spect and confidence of his neighbors, 
lie was a kind husband and father. 

About 2 years ago he fell and was 
from that time disabled until - his 
death, not being able to walk at all. 

He 1 was patienl in this long confine 
meld waiting his time of departure 
with composure and confidence in the 
Ruler of all worlds. 

P. D. G. 



MRS. FANNIE E. MASON'. 

It is with a sad heart \ attempt to 
write an obituary of my dear mother- 
in law. She was so near and dear lo 
my heart. But Cod knows best, and 
took her lo a better place than this. 

It is so sad thai I shall see he* no 
more on earth, but how consoling to 



feel she is gone from the sorrows of 
earth. 

She lived as pure a life as any one 
it seemed to me. She was honest and 
truthful. She never wanted to do any 

through mi uy trials and losses in 'this 
world, but the Lord hears us up in 
1 hem, bless his name. 

She suffered for a long time', had not 
been well for many years. How 1 did 
hate to sec her suffer, but could nol * 
help it. 

The Lord gives and takes. The last 
day of her life she .lid her work, sal 
up till bed time, and talked to her 
husband. After going lo bed she was 
taken worse, ami died in a aboul 1.") 
minutes. 

She was :: believer in the Primitive 
Baptist church. She was deeply con- 
cerned about her salvation. 

She died duly L3th, 1914. 

She was ahold 70 years of age. 

Sin; left a husband, two sons and 
their wives, and one grand child to 
mourn their loss. 

Written by one who loved her and. 
misses her much. 

B. M A SON.. 

Rose' Bay, N. C. 

FOR GOOD CHEAP FARMS COM E 
To MIDLAND, VIRGINIA. THE 
LAND OF GREATEST OP- 
PORTUNITY. 

Best of health, school and colleges, 
markets and shipping facilities, lands 
lie smooth and free from stone. Well 
watered and productive from $10 per 
acre up. Producing corn, -rain. bay. 
splendid stock raising propositions 
and no belter bright leaf tobacco land 
anywhere. All we ask is lo show you. 
Come ami he convinced. Send ' for 
booklet No. 20 today. R. FREDEE 
rCKSON & CO.. Blackstone Ya. 



Send us your printing. Work done 
neatly and promptly. P. D. G. 



LANDMARK. 



47 



FOR RHEUMATISM AND 
NEURALGIA 

Prink ten gallons of the celebrated 
Shivar Mineral Water, shipped from 
Spring — only two dollars. Money 
cheerfully refunded on return of emp- 
ty demijohns if you say it failed to 
relieve. Knl husiast ically endorsed 
by leading physicians and citizens as 
America's greatest curative- water. 
The same guarantee applies to Scia- 
tica, Nervous Headache, Stoamch, Liv- 
rr and Kidney diseases. Address 
Shivar Spring, Rox . r >. r i T, Shclton, S. 



LADIES $1000 REWARD! 

D;. J.'R Southin;-!nn R.'nvdy ro'.Tl's tUin'si' Kansas 'ci'l'y'.Mn. 



WHAT IS THE COCA COLA HABIT? 



I nst and foremost is is a myth. There 
Is no such thing as the Coca Cola habit ex- 
cept in the same sense that there is a water 
habit, a sugar habit, a fruit haoit or a caf- 
fein habit. As Coca Cola contains only car- 
bonated water, sugar, fruit flavors and caf- 
fein, the refreshing principle of coffee and 
tea, it is absolutely impossible for it to 
create a habit. 

People drink Coca Cola because they find 
it delicious and refreshing. They continue 
to drink it because they find it wholesome 
aul beneficial. When they are hot. thirsty 

sense tbat they crave rool water or ice tea. 
In spite of the. fact that Coca Cola contains 
only about, half as much caffein they prefer 
it to tea and coffee. 

Some have made the ridiculous blunder 
o r confusing caffein with the habit-forming 
drugs like cocaine and morphine. In che- 
mical composition and in physiological ac- 
t on it belongs to an entirely c.ifferent class. 
Caffein is refreshing to mind and body, 
whereas morphine and cocaine, being nar- 
cotics, have exactly the opposite effect. 

In defining the term "habit-forming" and 
in discussing the question as to whether 
caffein belongs to that class or not, Doctor 
.Mallet, Fellow of the Royal Society, and for 
1 early forty years the Professor of Chemis- 
try at the University of Virginia, gave the 
following expert testimony under oath: 

"In the first place, I think the habit form- 
ed must be a detrimental one and an in- 



jurious one, and in the second place, one 
which becomes so firmly fixed upon a per- 
son acquiring it that it is thrown off with 
great difficulty and with considerable suf- 
fering, and in the third place, that the con- 
tinued exercise of the habit increases the 
demand for the habit-forming drug; and caf- 




"RHEUMATISM*' 
Cured to Stay Cured 
By One Who Had it 

My Dear Reader:— -1911- 

1 am an old lady nearly 90 years old. 
My life's work among the sick i Hearing 
it.s end. At the age of r><» 1 was terribly 
afflicted with rheumatism; I suffered un- 
told agony for nearly live years. 1 have 
been a herbist, nurse and student of 
roots and herbs for nearly 70 years. 1 
diagnosised and formulated a cure that 
cured me, and it never returned. I have 
treated nearly 7500 rheumatic sufferers, 
some of the most pitiful cases imagin- 
able; I effected cures in practically every 
case. I want you to read my treatise on 
the "cause and cure" of rheumatism. 
"Don't suffer"; it is easy to get well. My 
treatise is FREE; send for it today; you 
will then know what to do, and how to 
do it. Sicerely yours, 

LYDIA E. SMALL. 
L L.-2V4 Fenway Station, Boston, Mass. 



ENTERTAINING BOOK 

If you wish to read a highly enter- 
taining book of about 80 pages— price 
50 cents — descriptive of characters 
bo! h true and false, as set forth in the 
Bible, send for this book. 

Address 

ELDER F. W. KEENE, 
North Berwick, Maine. 
Or order the book from me. 

P. D. GOLD, 
Wilson, N. C. 



T have made an arrangement for a 
very ni«e Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. Q 



4K 



ZION'g LANDMARK. 



REQUEST. 
We are in ueed of money to pay cx- 
penses. Wkiie war is raging in the 
hast we need money as much as it' 
there were no war. We can help each 
other by paying debts. Please send 
on what is due on the Landmark, and 
let each one pay his debts, as far as 
possible, and I his will hc\p to relieve 
i he distress. 

r. d. o. 



FOURTEENTH EDITION OE SHAPE 
NOTES. 

We are getting out the Fourteenth 
Edition of Shape Notes of our Hymn 
and Tune Books which will soon h| 
ready for distribution. The price is 
70 cents each, sent by mail, .and six 
dollars per dozen sent by express at 
cost of purchaser. 

There will he sent with each book, 
upon request, without additional cost, 
a neat pamphlet of 30 pages, contain- 
ing rudiments of music, and graded 
•lessons for use in singing classes, in 
connection with the Hymn and Tune 
Rook. Send orders to Elder Silas H 
Durand- Southampton, Pa., or Elder P. 
G. Lester, Lloyd, Va., or to Elder P 1). 
Gold, Wilson, N. C. 

SALVATION ALONE Til LOLL] I 
CHRIST THE LORD? 

Tu insure quick sales this Little work 
of 32 pages will i; ; w be sen! at L0 cents 
per copy or six copies for 50 cents. It 
is kindly but plainly w lit ten and shews 
briefly from their own literature the 
( tod-dishonoring doctrines everywhere 
taught, as gospel truth hy modern in- 
stitutions. Brethren, semi for this ten- 
cent hook' that your sons and daugh- 
ters who are now with you may be 
L : 'warned agains this captivating and 
enticing teaching and led astray by it. 

Address orders to 
S. B. LUCKETT. 
Crawfordsville, Ind. 



An Only Daughter 

Relieved of Consumption 

When death was hourly expected, all remedies 
having failed, and Dr. II. James was experiment- 
ing with the many herbs of Calcutta, he acci- 

only child ol fonsum pi ion. lie has proved 

five's" his recVpe'ln-e' '.'nVv' asking twoTcent 
stamps to pay expenses. This herb nKo 
cnre< Night Sweals, Nans, ;, at the stomach and 
will break up a I'n^h old in iwentv-four hours. 
Address Craddock & Co., Philadelphia. 
Pa„ naming this paper. 



THREE BOOKS OF INTEREST. 

Have You Read Them? 
Biographical History of Baptist 
Ministers 

containing nearlj 1000 sketches, 38] 
pictures of Ministers, Deacons and tal 
ented Sisters, together with an Appen- 
dix of much useful information — 
Price $2.00. 

Also Theodosin Ernest, The Heroine of 
Faith, and Ten Days in Search 
of the Church 

both these hooks in one volume and 
contain 637 pages. No work of its size 
and cost is a better defense of Bible 
doctrine and practice, or sets the one 
church Christ built in fairer colors. 

Price $1.25. 
These books are well printed or. good 
paper, substantially and neatly bound, 
and above all they' are highly 'endorsed 
by Elders Ilassel'l. Cash,. Thompson, 
Gold, Waters, foalton, Chick, Hurst, 
Webb, Lester, Cayce, I '.ranseome, Nor- 
ton, Stewart. Henderson. Hanks, Dur- 
and, Daily, Moore, Olipftant, Lundy, 
Morris, Hardy. Raulston, Pope, Mew 
born, (Libert, Parmer, Denny, Elkins, 
and hundreds of other ministers and 
editors the country over. 
As long as they last both volumes will 
be sent together for $2.75 and if you 
are not pleased with your purchase 
thev may be returned in good order 
and money will he refunded. 

Send all orders to 
R. H. PITTMAN, Luray, Va. 



JON'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 
A T 

WILSON, NORTH/ CAROLINA 

Primitive or Old School Baptist 

If ! i / 

[ N. C, DEC. 15, NUMBER 



VOL. XLVIII. WILSON ] 




P. D. GOLD, BdMtor WQmb, N. 8 

P. G. LESTER, Amo. Editor Floyd, 



Sl.M PEE TEAR. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 



" Aak for the old patha where k tke good way." 

By tie help of the Lord this paper will contend for tke 
ancient landmark, guided by ita stakes of Truth, and 
strengthened by its eorde of lore. 

It hopes to rejeet all traditions and institutions of men, 
and regard only the Bible as tne standard of truth. 
' It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey 
Jesus, the King in the Holy Hill of Son, keeping them- 
selves unspotted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spent, the 
blessed Comforter. 

KOTIGKI 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new poat offices. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what Is due, and also 
ni.sis qh. t'otiwhtev! c 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if pes- 
sibls, and when he renews give the same name it has been 
going in, unless he wishes it changed, then he should state 
both the old and the new names. 

If the money sent has net been receipted, please inform 
we of it. When you can always send money by money order 
or check, or draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Each subscriber can toll the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to set as agent* 

All B&iaea and post offioes should be written plainly. 

All lover* of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if 
«e impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peaec be multiplied to all levers 
of truth. 

All eemmunieatiens, business letters, remittances of P. 0. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 



P. D. SOLD, Wilson, K. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Elder P; D. Cold, beloved of the 
Lord I Jio]k»:— This P. M while at my 
work, my mind and thoughts were 
much of the time, on you. 

Since I heard you preach last April, 
I have many tiuies been enabled to 
eat of the crumbs dropped from the 
Master's table that day. Isn't it won- 
derful to think on that great high 
Priesl who sits at the right hand of 
the Father making intercession for 
his saints, and I do desire so much to 
have more evidence that I am one of 
that blessed number. 

Bro. Gold, I go mourning much of 
my time, and the dark clouds hover 
close, that I wonder if they will ever 
be removed, and I be enabled to see 
His smiling face and hear His gentle 
voice again so far from God I seem 
to lie. It often makes me weep and 
cry. My desire is to be reconciled to 
the Lord's will, but by nature I am 
so rebelious that, I cannot do the 
things I would do. 

The Lord has promised to give 
strength according to our day, and is 
a present help in trouble, but poor 
me, my faith is so weak and I find 
mjyself trusting in my own strength, 
and the result is that T mourn and 
lament my sad condition. I am kept 
busy trying to undo the wrongs I 
have already done, hence I find no 



i h.>*e' use' 



time to learn to do 
brethren will pity poor me i 
member me at a throne of gr; 
we are told that the "righteous cry 
and the Lord heareth them." 

If I know my desire, it is for a 
(doser walk with God and it takes 
tribulation to bring us to that walk, 
however nature shrinks and would 
shun tribulation thus leaving off the 
whole armour of God, which armour 
enables the child of God to stand 
against the wile's of the devil. Last 
April when I heard you preach you 
said, once when you were deeply 
troubled you even desired death, 
feeling that the grave would be a 
sweet resting place. This remark did 
me much good, for I too, had craved 
to die, and have wondered why the 
Lord spared the life of such an un- 
profitable being as I felt to be. If we 
die in Jesus, great is the gain and I 
have a sweet hope that when he hung 
on the rugged tree of the cross and 
bled and said, "it is finished," I was 
one in that covenant of love. If so, 
since he lay in that new tomb and 
arose, I dread not its gloom, but of- 
ten feel that it will be a sweet rest- 
ing place. 

My dear brothel-, if I could feel 
sure that the Lord is choosing my 
changes, for mry good, I would not go 
moaning so much of the time. 

Pray for me that this darkness bp 



50 



'/AOS > LAXI>.\IARK. 



removed, and that 1 may once more 
rejoice. 

Lovingly, but in sorrow, 

IRENE M. YOUNG. 



ROM. 5:17, 18, 19 VERSES. 

Dear Brother Hardy:— Will you be 1 
so kind as to give your views otf Rom. 
5:17, 18, 19 verses? Does it mean all 
of Adam's race where it says "All 
Men." Please answer this through 

Your brother, J hope, 

J. M. PRESNELL. 

[Urar Brother Gold:— I will, as L 
may have strength, comply with the 
request of brother 1'resneJl. 

'•For if [by one man's offence death 
reigned by one; much more they 
which receive abundance of grace and 
of the gift of righteousness shall reign 
in life by one, Jesus Christ. Therefore 
as by the offence of one judgment 
came upon all men to condemnation; 
even so by the righteousness of one 
the free gift came upon all me'n unto 
justification of life. For as by one 
man's disobedience many were made 
sinners, so by the obedience of our 
shall many be made righteous." Rom. 
5:17, 18, 19. 

It is by the death of our Lord Jesus 
that we (all who Avere His or who 
were in Him) were reconciled to God, 
much more, being reconciled, we shall 
be saved by His life. That is the same 
"We" who were 1 reconciled by His 
death, are saved by His life. 

Both the earthly Adam and the 
heavenly Adam are representative 
characters. 

pur e'arthly head, Adam, was one- 
hut all. the human race was in him, 
or must proceed from him. In his or- 
iginal state he was good and alto- 
gether without sin, He was upright. 
In that slate Hod gave him His holy 

Jaw, That law was their given t© all 



those who were representively in him. 
Eve, the mother of all living, was in 
him at the time of the giving of that 
law and therefore she received the 
law in her head or husband. This is 
one of the points in which Adam was 
the figure of Him (Christ) that was 
to come. When the temptation came 
this woman was deceived and went in- 
to tin- transgression. As soon as she 
presented to her husband what she 
had done and her fallen condition ap- 
pealed to him he partook with her of 
that which was forbidden. He was 
not deceived. Here was the falling 
into the ground and the dying of the 
one seed of the human race from which 
all men have sprung in the fulfillment 
of the direct command of God to mul- 
tiply and replenish the earth. It is 
very evident that the entire human 
race 1 was in this one man just as 
many thousands of grains of wheat 
are in the one grain which is sown in 
the earth, and as they all must come 
out of that one grain by a process 
which God has ordered in nature, even 
so all men had to come 1 forth out of I 
that one man by a certain law which 
God had ordained in the man. Instead 
of the purpose of Cod being frustrated 
in the disobedience of man that pur- 
pose is only accomplished. 

Now, this man is disobedient and a 
sinner, and under the curse of a holy 
law. As he is so must all his off- 
spring be. Tf the father and mother 
are slaves at the time of the birth of 
a child that child is under the same 
law to the same master. Therefore all 
their children are sinners and under 
the law of condemnation. The sen- 
tence of death that was passed upon 
Adam. Dust thou art and unto dust 
shalt thou return, is on all his race 
to this day. Therefore the apostle 
has said, As in Adam all die, &c. 
Every corporal human de'ath is in 
Adam because the one dying was in 
Mm find, received the sentence in 



Z ION'S LANDMARK. 



51 



him, and in him must pay the penally. 
Thus Adam represented all of his 
race. 

Then the apostle said, Even so iu 
Christ shall all be made alive, &c. &lu 
the text we are taught that they 
which receive abundance of grace and 
of the gift of righteousness shall reign 
in life by one Jesus Christ, by whose 
righteousness the free gift (not the 
free offer) came upon all men uuto 
justification of life. Jt was by the 
obedience of this one man (Jesus 
Christ ) that many are made righteous. 

As just as many as 'were in Adam 
were made sinners by his sin, even so 
jus! as many as we're in Christ Jesus 
were made righteous by His righteous- 
ness. Paul tells the Bphesian church 
fcHal they were chosen in Bim before 
the foundation of the world. He tells 
the Galatian churches that they are, 
as Isaac was, the children of promise. 
The Lord said they were given unto 
Bim by the Father. The angel said 
Be should save His people from their 
sins'. Not< — the sins were theirs. 
There could be a great array of testi- 
mony to show that nil those who are 
saved by the Lord Jesus were in Him. 
When Be died for them they were all 
dead, lie was their representative 
and whal He did was theirs and done 
for them. All of them tog ther could 
not do one good thing hut this One 
.Man did all for them. 

Therefore il is by the obedience of 
this One Man that many are made 
righteous. How many? Just as many 
as were represented in His obedience. 

As Adam, the earthly seed, brought 
forth thai which is earthly, even so 
Christ, th" heavenly seed, brings forth 
thai which is the fruit of the spirit. 
As Adam was the head of Rve, the wo- 
man of the earth, eve'n as Christ is the 
Head of the spiritual bride and it was 
she thai He came to save. It is in His 
righteousness thai she is made right- 
eous and thai she stands justified and 



s;'.eu before the Father, 

In the final completion of this won- 
dcrful salvation they shall vll be made 
alive from the dead. That is their 
bodies shall live' as His body lives. For 
He shall descend from heaven with a 
shout, with the voice of the archangel, 
and with the trump of Cod: and the 
dead in Christ shall rise first. Then 
we which are alive and remain shall 
be caught up together with them 
(those who were the dead in Christ 
and who have risen from the dead) 
in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the 
air: ami so shall we ever be with the 
Lord. 

Dear brothei', this is the promise' 
that we all have who are repres 'llt- ■ , 
in Christ, and while this is true it is\ 
a!'S0 true that the rest of the dead 
shall be raifed up to the resurrection 
of damnation. This should be enough 
to fully prove that the same "All" 
that, died in Adam or that sinned iu 
him and died by his sin is not the 
same "All" that are made alive in 
Christ, or that are' made righteous by 
His obedience. 

T hope you will understand this 
and thai the Lord will bless it to your 
comfort. 

Your in other in hope, 

L. H. HARDY. 

Atlantic, N. C. 



COMMUNICATION. 

James R. Jones, dear brother: — In 
answer to your letter of 22 davs ago, 
will say: 

My daughter "Pearl" that was sick 
with the fever is well, and gone on to 
teaching her school. 

When we received your letter T was 
arranging 1o go to our Association 
which was held with the church at 
Pilgrims Rest, Pulaski County, Va. 
We had a good meeting. The preach- 
ing was of one accord. Our moderator. 
Elder P. 0. Lester, preached wonder- 



ZIOK'S LANDMARK. 



fully the closing sermon from 2 'Tiiij- 
othy, 2:19. "Nevertheless, the founda- 
tion oi God, standeth sure, having this 
seal, The Lord knoweth them that are 
his." 

lie preached with the blessedness 
of the Spirit and power of God. It 
makes me glad to hear the brethren 
preach as able as I would like to. 

Brother Lester is blessed of the Lord 
to feed the nock with knowledge, I 
hue him for the work-sake. Our love 
for the brethren is a part of our in- 
heritance which we inherit by the 
adoption. 

We who were not sons are now the 
( ons of God by the adoption. See Gal. 
/" ,^6. ^*^And because ye are sons, not 
ere*vtmt < a re sons' God hath sent 
\ forth the Spirit of his Son into 'not 
to', but into your hearts crying, Abba, 
Father." 

And because God hath done this, ye 
are now become the sons of God. This 
iS the revealing of them which were 
created in Chrisl Jesus unto good 
works. Not created in Christ Jesus to 
good works ; but unto good works. It 
is a good work that we believe, as 
the Lord said, This is the work of God 
that ye belive on him whom he hath 
sent. God sent his own Son, that 
whosoever believeth in him should not 
perish &c. 

We would perish without Hope. But 
God sending his own Son into the 
world, and having formed Christ in 
us the hope of glory. As Jesus said, 
"In the Father," "to the heirship," 
and the Father in me. "The right of 
posse'ssion." I in you, "your hope," 
and you in me, the right to inherit 
the goodly possession, and thus we in- 
herit the love of God, in union and fel- 
lowship with the brethren. The only 
son is heir to all the Father hath, and 
in the' Son the bride hath a right to 
his great riches. The gift of God is 
eternal life, through Jesus Christ our 
L«rd ; this if an «.al»«ui<i»«! r«al *staU 



Then God having predestinated us un- 
to the adoption of children by Jesus 
Christ. We, therefore, have a right 
to his personal estate. 

We enjoy the personal estate with 
the dear people of God, which is his 
heritage, and we love and enjoy the 
•presence of the brethren as His per- 
sonal body. 

As Adam said (when he recognized 
his bride) this is now bone of my 
bones, and flesh of my flesh. Eve was 
created in Adam, and afterward God 
made her manifest. So the bride of 
Christ was created in him, but not 
made manifest by creation, but by 
formation, for ye are his workmanship 
created in Christ Jesus unto good 
works which God hath (before ordained 
that we should walk in them." And 
for this cause the church of Jesus 
Christ is made manifest, that she 
should be an helpmeet of the Lord to 
nurse the children of the heavenly 
kingdom, and to keep house unto the 
Lord, and to receive food and raiment 
at His hand, and to be blessed with 
honor in his name forevermore. So 
we receive the gift of God which is 
eternal life through Jesus Christ our 
Lord as a real estate, and the enjoy- 
ments with the saints of God as his 
personal estate. I have written the 
above lines in love and fellowship to 
you brother Jones. 

My wife also sends you he'r sisterly 

Your brother in Christ I hope, 
D. SMITH WEBB. 



A BROTHER'S HOPE. 

What 1 saw in my dream [ have 
been requested by a good brother to 
write off. 

One night I lay down very early 
and thought I was walking a strait 
path, and there was a man on my lefl 
side that walked with me. Pretty soon 
I found the path looked beautiful. I 



/ION'S LANDMARK. 53 

had not traveled it far before it got vjalked over with this man safely, and 

crooked, blaek and muddy, and there these devils had got m troiit coining 

I saw many devils, all appeared to be in a greai charge. Tins man went 

one size, and as blaek as they could straignt meeting them, and J walned 

in-, and they appeared to be busy in by Ins side. \\ lien they got in ton\ 

motion, but no work done. Some ap- or nfty yards he ran len or filteen 

peared to be measuring cloth, some' yards ana shuck a line north ana 

Chopping /with the hoe, and different soutli so long it bad no end, and there 

kinds of work I know nothing about, was not a crook in Jt. When thes< 

and there was a crowd all the time devils came lo the line they could not 

trying to catch me in traps and cross. 1 looked up and, down the line 

snares. I told them that they had no and there was no one "on the same 

•power over me. 1 said unto this man side we were, bul this man., and my- 

we must look that straight path. 1 sen. Liight here he spoke bis first 

had not gone far before we found a word. Here you see dial (iod has a 

beautiful path. T traveled it until it people among ;,ll nations, kindred am' 

got crooked, black and muddy just tongues. 

like the first and there 1 saw a crowd I looked up and down the I iie'.'.v-' -'\ 
of devils all seemed to be in a motion. and there- were all colors to a' i.ia. u . 
but no work done just like the first, h man, to a while man. 1 thought I 
was so near awake that I heard the would count and see which was tin 
chickens crow. I thought all these most, but 1 didn't count. 1 said unto 
paths seemed right unto man, but the this man, just look this straight path, 
cud thereof was death. I said unto and I soon found it, traveled the path 
this man. just view that straight path. till we came to an iron wall very high, 
I had not gone far before I found ;i Large gate opened and we went in. 
a beautiful path. I traveled it till it The wall was very large, seemed to 
got crooked, blaek and muddy just be about four square, ami in the mid- 
like the others. T stood there and die there was a large tank in. the form 
looked on awhile, and T said unto this of a water tank, and I went up to the 
man that was with me. just view that top of the lank and this man that was 
straight path. The' man hadn't said with me stayed on the ground. I 
any thing. I soon found a path that peeped in there, and I put my hand 
led up to a hedgerow with an open- over on a rod of iron thai ran across 
ing in front, and in that field there to look in that dreadful place. One 1 
was the largest' black house I ever saw of the little devils said to another, 
covered over with black fringe, hung turn that little faucet so he will have 
down to the windows and many more to fall in. and the rod began to get 
little black huts all scattered around, hot. I turned loose and said you 
and thousands of devils. T asked one can't get m,ie« in that place. I turned 
of these little devils where was the around and this man Hung me a rope 
devil's headquarters, and he pointed with a loop in it and 1 eased down be- 
to that large black house. I said un- side it. 1 said to this man, just go out 
to tins man with, me just view that of this 'place, and when we got to the 
straight path, ami a drttm tapped al gate there were mere' coming in, and 
headquarters, and a line of devils, too it was open. These devils caughl hold 
many to number appeared. They had of the gate and slammed it to keep 
dug a pit before me covered over with me from going out, bul I outpulled 
a web. T told them a shouldn't fall them, as they bad no strength. As 
in. They had no 'power ever me. so T soon as 1 jot out I said to this man, 



54 



( 

ZION'S LANDM AKK. 



jusl view this straight path, and we? to lead, guide and instruct as. He is 

turned to the right. We soon came our strength., our all. In him lies our 

to a Large sandy path and turned to hope, winch is an anchor to the soul 

l tie lett. We hadn't traveled far be- both sure and steadfast. This hope is 

tore we came to a path leading north built on nothing less than Jesus' blood 

and south, and on the other side of and righteousness. .Jesus is the' Kock, 

the path there were more devils than the sure foundation, the chief corner 

we had seen all night, all one color stone. Jesus says, "on this rock 1 

and all appeared 10 be one size. While will Ibuild my church, aud the gates of 

1 was standiifg there looking on, they hell shall not prevail against it." All 

railed a man that used to belong to others are built on sinking sand, ami 

my mess, and said he is here, and I thejy cannot stand. The foundation 

looked over to see if I could see a of God standeth sure, having this seal, 

white man. 1 said, is he here? And the Lord knoweth them that are his. 

they said yes, but he was so black 1 Yes, they have a seal and this seal is 

dTd not know him. I thought in tine. 1 bought with Christ's precious blood. 

(J thenar he was a .Methodist, and we God sending his only Son in the like- 

f f^argue on that point. Three ness of sinful fiesh to condemn sin in 

^\*inies I said unto this man. just view the Hesh, suffered, bled and died that 

tin's straight path, and he said, you we might live, and if he give his only 

can't go home tonight. I told him I begotten Son will he not freely give 

could go home. He said no, you can't us all things'/ Then all things are 

go home tonight*. I thought 1 could ours. Ye are Christ 's and Christ is 

not go home for I was not dead. He Cod's. 

said T have been with you all this But dear kindred, so many have fal- 

night. I studied for awhile and said, len asleep, have we all like sheep your 

how shall 1 knew you have been with astray, departed from the faith, have 

me all night? and ho said, because' I we forgotten what each one of us cost 

have delivered you frcm all traps and Jesus, his precious blood: laid down 

snares that Satan has spread before his life for us that we might live.' 
you this night. F fell down at his feet 

and tried to thank him. but I was so 0 dear kindred, what a. sad decline, 

full I could not speak. I had to thank 0 (iod have pity upon Zion. 

him bv actions, and when T woke up I Saviour visit thy plantation, 

awoke in that same state. Every norve Granl us Lord a gracious rain, 

in me was full, and I needed nothing. All will come to desolation, 

T am now 68 years old and T saw this Unless thou return again, 
over twenty-two years ago, and I hope 

if he did deliver he will continue to jt»od revive us. all our help must 

deliver. eome from thee. Help is only needed. 

WTLLTAM H. TOLSTON. That spotless Lamb of Cod 'has been 

Tarhoro. N. C. forsaken for the world. 0 Lord wilt 

: thou bring us back to thee, that City 

COMMUNICATION. that is set upon a hill is shining very 

dim. 0 dear kindred I feel the enemy 

Dear Brother Cold, and to the is fast approaching on us. a big battle 

household of faith:— Again I am com- facing us, and let us come boldly to 

ing before you in my weakness, hay- the throne of grace asking the Lord to 

ing no confidence in' the flesh. TTow enable us to put on the whole armor 

dependant We are upon an alwise Cod of Cod that we may be able to stand. 



ZIQN'S LANDMARK. 



1 will say to all, let us he up ami 
have our lamps trimmed and burning. 
Watch these things and stand fast in 
the liberty wherein Christ hath set us 
Tree without wavering. 

1 will say to all, awake thou that 
sleepeth and arise from the dead and 
Christ will give thee light. 

O land of rest for thee 1 sigh. 
When will the moment come 
When 1 shall lay this armor by, 
And dwell with Christ at home? 
We will wail till Jesus comes 
And we will he gathered home 

Dear kindred, pray for me that my 
whole trust may he iti Jesus, and that 
he will enable me to hold out faithful 
to the end. 

From one whose hope is in Christ 
•lesus the Rock. 

MAGQIE A. STATON. 

Bethel, N. C. 



A DREAM. 

Dear Brother Gold:— Two rights 
before war was declared between Tur- 
key and Italy 1 dreamed a dream 
which I related to you on the 1 day the 
war was declared. Now I want to 
write that dream and then follow it 
up with one I dreamed when I was 8 
years old. 

In the dream which 1 had a few 
years ago it w 7 as as follows: 

I was standing in the opeli air hold- 
ing a little girl by the hand. We heard 
a noise as ;t rushing wdnd in the air. 
We looked upward and a little north- 
ward and saw an angel flying through 
the heavens from east to west on that 
parallel of latitude' which passes 
through northern Turkey and south- 
ern Italy. The angel was the most 
mighty being I ever imagined. He was 
about forty feet in length and I sup- 
pose he was three or four feet in di- 
ameter through the body at the girth. 



His wings wers about sixty feet from 
tip to ti<p. He wore an helmet of steel 
on his head and his body and wings 
were* covered with steel feathers ex- 
cept his right leg from the knee down 
which was naked. There was a shaft 
of wood budded around his right 
ankle which extended out tWard the 
north as he Hew. Just above that 
shaft were two eagles on the wing 
and facing each other, but notwith- 
standing they were Hying they kept 
over the shaft. There were sitting on 
the shaft either seven or nine eagles 
and all of a. color except one. They 
were of murky color as we're the tw.> 

other, except the one that sat nearesl 
the angel. That one was brown, only 
the bead and tail were white. That 
was the most powerful of them and 
appeared to he more quiet. The angel 
appeared to be about two hundred 
yards high and was Hying very rap- 
idly. As he' flew he declared war. I 
knew all he said before I awoke and 
repeated it all in my mind and then 
after I awoke 1 repeated it all several 
times over. 1 thought it would be 
best to geH up and write it down but 
it was so plain and clear I was sure I 
woid.l remember it and went off to 
sleep. The next morning I remember- 
ed only the vision of the dre'am and 
the word "War," which was very 
emphatic in what he said. The next 
day 1 was at your house and told you 
the dream. The next morning you 
showed me in the News and Observer 
thai war had been declared between 
Turkey and Italy. Then 1 thought of 
the two flying eagles th:A were facing 
each other. The other murky eagles 
that were silting on the shaft appear- 
ed to me 1 to be the nations in tin; east 
which are nearer to those waring na- 
tions, and the brown eagle that sat 
near the flying angel appeared to me 
to represent our own government. 
It was not long after that war had 



XI OX'S LANDMARK. 



be'gun thai I saw in a paper that the 
Ottoman Turks had sworn to kill all 
the Christians. That brought to my 
mind a dream that I saw when 1 was 
eighl years old. I will hero relate it : 
In my dream J stood in an old held 
of about twenty acres which had been 
turned out. 1 Avas on the north side 
of the lield not far from the northwest 
corner. A little west of me 1 there was 
a small log house and a little east of 
me there was a small garden fenced 
in with new pine rails. South of me 
and on the other side of the Held there 
was a h«rd of about twenty cows 
r l'e.ediug. AVith the eows there were 
Cjiwo hulls. The cows were all red but 
about three and they were of a deer- 
red. One of the bulls was very red, 
of a deep or cold-blood color, the other 
was of a splotched color. There would 
he a re'd sploch with white hairs 
mingled in and a white sploch ming- 
led with red hair. The red bull was 
very large and powerful but the other 
one w as more than twice his size' and 
strength. They and the cows were 
feeding quietly together. About half 
way between them and me was Har- 
riot Cade, now sister Harriet Fails, of 
Mew bom's church in Greene county. 
As I looked on I heard the very large 
hull bellow. His voice was like dis- 
tant thunder and the ground tremb- 
led under my feet. After a short 
while he bellowed again and his voice 
was as before and again the 1 ground 
tremhled under my fed. After he 
bellowed the second time he continue'd 
that roaring noise and came towards 
us. When he got to the girl lie took 
hold of her in some way, 1 do not 
know how, and 'began to throw he'r 
up high in the air. She begged for 
her life hut he spoke and witl^ the 
v.:ice of a man and said, "I am sworn 
to kill all the Christians." At thai 1 
ran into the house and took a sheet, a 
hammer and some nails and nailed 
the two edges of the sheet to the top 



rail of the garden fence, threw the 
sheet over in the garden and crawled 
in the hollow of the sheet to hide 
from the bull that had sworn to kill 
all the Christians. There mv dream 
ended. Though 1 was but eight years 
old it is as plain to me now as it was 
the next morning and the vision of it 
is much more clear. 

In meditating on this dream it has ; 
appeared to me 1 that the powerful red 
hull is Koman Catholicism, the cows, 
the red ones, are those religious that 
have sprung out of Rome, and the 
lighter red ones are 1 those Baptisl de- 
nominations that have on the Baby- 
lonish garments and have taken the 
golden wedge as did Achan in Israel. 

The Episcopalians and Presbyter- 
ians, when they had the same power, 
persecuted the Baptists and others for 
their religious sentime'nt .just as the 
Koman Catholics did. There were 
others, as the early religious settlers 
of this country who did the same. 
This being an historical truth why 
are they not just as bad as the Cath- 
olics? If they had as much power 
and that lasted as long as did the 
[lowers of Home why would they not 
do as much damage as Home did.' 
Truly they are bloody cattle, re'd with 
the blood of the saints. 

The Baptist denominations have 
not done these things but they have 
joined house to house' with those who 
did. They work together in protract- 
ed meetings and in other ways. They 
try as hard to get people to join in 
with those Babylonish sects as thCy 
do i)i their own sect. The Babylon- 
ians try as hard to get members for 
these sects of Baptists as they do for 
their own sects. Then what is the 1 dif- 
ference? They felloAVship each otlier. 
work together and all of them w ho 
nro consistent in one 1 act with their 
other acts commune 1 together. Now, 
are they not all one people? One set 
of people;' One herd of cattle? So T 



ZlON'S LANDMARK. 



57 



saw them and so 1 believe them to bo. 
That is my honest faith in this thing. 

The very large bull represents the 
Mohamedans. They have sworn 
against all those who profess Chris- 
tianity and no more against the church 
thau ch< Liabylouians just so they bear 
he name "Christian." 



Resented, the L6th chapter of Bev- 
i lation and the great gathering of the 

! ml the greal wars which are now 
i aging in the east as eagle 1 after eagle 
have spreaded their wings over the 
shall 1 1 1 which was carried by 
messengers of Cod in his declaration, 
; ad my mind asked the question: How 
I hi- o)i Lord God Almighty when 
thy word shall he fulfilled? 

Tlu-se things are too deep for me, 
i nd 1 pray the Lord to keep us and 
so blc.s us thai we may stand the 
ies;s which are before us. Nothing 
but his powerful arm can bear us up. 
We may think that we can die with 
Him but i smemd er our older brother 
Pet) r. That will show to us that there 
are none of us who have strength to 
Stand unless we are held up by His 
holy hand. 

Lord bless Thy poor people to love 
■■nd serve TLc'e. If the world perse- 
cute us may we cleave the closer to 
Tin nd Thy way. 

R ipectfully and lovingly submitt- 
ed. 

L; II. HARDY. 

Atlantic. N. C. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Dear Brother Gold :— Enclosed find 
check for subscription to Landmark 
beginning with last issue, as T feel to 
say truthfully that ALONE is worth 
subscription price; and really feel 



that it should be reproduced occasion- 
ally: surely not remain idle or not 
reprinted in length of time, since first' 
production, which if J remember wa£ 
in the year 1870. I was a child 
at that time, but remember hearing 

Later r heard others discuss it. and so 
much wished to read, but never had 
an opportunity until the lasl issue. 
There we're years of my life "When 
tossed about 'with every wind of doc- 
trine," that this letter would have 
been the greatest comfort to my tem- 
pest-tossed soul. It would have beer, 
such a joy. such a rest, and made me 
more established in the doctrine <>i 

our Saviour, though there was never 
a time that I did not love I he true 1 
church of God. 

"Jesus sought me when a stranger," 
arresting my soul on the ball room 
floor. Oh ! the misery of a convicted 
sinner, justly condemned before a just 
God. What could I do but pray? No- 
body had to tell me' to do it. when 
every breath was a petition to Him 
for mercy. 

Days, weeks, months and years went 
by. I was a beggar still. In His own 
time "He put a new song in my mouth 

I have had many sorrows and afflic- 
tions while passing through this way, 
but have been made to rejoice in a 
rise'n Saviour as my God and my sal- 
vation. 

On one occasion my mother was in 
South Carolina, mjy health Avas bad, 
only able to be up part of the time. T 
took pen to write and asked myself, I 
suppose no one else be'ing present. 
What shall 1 write? and immediately 
it was answered in my heart write her 
"The 'poor have the gospel preach e£& 
to them." T did not need to ask wiR) 
the poor were, as T saw them, knew 
who they were, and oh ! how T tried 
to glorify God for His goodne'ss to me 



58 



ziox's landmark. 



a poor sinner. 

I Leave among you a poor ami afflict- 
ed people. They shall ibe called the 
sons of God." All this opened up to 

eould not portray to* her halt' the 
beauty I saw, or love 1 felt. The above 
I passed through twenty-two years 
ago: it is sweet to me 1 now. 

I have drunk deeply of sorrow's bit- 
ter ('up. and I'elt at times to have got- 
ten to its very dregs, but with it all 
God has been pre'cious to me, and led 
me over when the way seemed so dark. 
I feel to know there are trials lor us 
while in this world, and are for our 
"good, however severe and well remem- 
ber rejoicing when in great sorrow 1 
was tn iug to ask God that the trouble 
might be removed and a clear sky for 
me. opened my bible with the words on 
my lips, instantly my eyes fell on these 
words, "My grace is sufficient for 
thee." I closed it saying, Lord, I 
know it. 

You will please 'pardon this Lengthy 
letter. I had no thought to have made 
it so, but these things are so sweet to 
me at times I feel I must speak of 
them. 1 only intended to send sub 
scription and ask you to give your 
views on Solomon Song 8:8. 

NELL j I K AIJ,SP,lvO()K HI DDK 'K. 
Scotland Neck. N. C. 

REMARKS : — On request of sister 
Kiddick. of Scotland Neck, on Sol- 
omon's Song 8:8. "We have a little 
sister, and she hath no breasts: what 
shall we do for our sister in the day 
she shall be spoken for?" 

The theme of this song of songs .s 
love— not the ordinary, fleshly pol 
luted love of earth, but that love that 
many waters cannot quench, nor can- 
0 the floods drown it. If a man were 
tWgive all the wealth of his hoi se for 
it such an offer would be utterly con- 
demned. It is above the price of rub- 
ies. It is not ol t hjs earth, but is from 



a Far country, for its origin is above 
this world. When bestowed on one 
that one is always astonished that one 
so vile should rind favor in him who is 
not of this world. 

The mallei- of marriage is involved 
in it ; nor as it as of earthly mar- 
riages, where there may be putting 
away: if not death shall dissolve these 
marriages. Hut in this holy wedlock 
thy .Maker is thy husband. The God 
of the whole earth shall He be called. 
Solomon sees the wonder of one com- 
ing out of the wilderness and leaning 
on her beloved. In the jealousy tha; 
shows the earnest desire for this love 
in its fulness, the distress the bride 
feels when this love is not shown, but 
the great joy when this marriage, 
where there is no putting away, but 
where the betrothal is in Loving kind- 
ness amd tender mercies forever. 

In this marriage the inequality of 
the beloved and his bride is so mani- 
fest that none on earth had expected 
this. In the open field of sin. in the 
defilement of her pollution, and the 
nakedness of her own shame she was 
as one despised in her own eyes, and 
as expecting no favor. But the be- 
loved passed by in the time of his love, 
and he spreads his own skirt of love 
over her, and thus she appears as the 
choice one of her that bare her, while 
the beloved as the ehiefest of ten 
thousand, and altogether lovely is 
•preferred above all others. 

In the kinship of this marriage is a 
little sister unprovided for. whoso 
prospect of marriage is without the 
needed provision. In the day that, 
she is spoken for whal shall be done 
for her. for she is wholly without ( n- 
dowinent. She hath no breasts, nor 
any hope for favor. Poverty is her 
lot. How can she ihid favor of Iler 
husband, as she hath no breasts? How 
can she be beloved? To be barren, 
motherless, is to bo despised. 'WLJIe 
the Jerusalem above is free and the 



X ION'S LANDMARK. 



oil 



mother of us all, what provision can neither bond nor free, but all one in 
be' made for this little Gentile sister Christ Jesus, and the things irrecon- 
with no prospeel of any favor shown cible and not -possible in nature shall 
her. For she is so poor she hath no be a body with out a schism in the 
breasts, and hence can furnish no hand of the wonderful builder, 
nourishment. It.' this little sister be a wall we will 
In nature there was no provision build upon her a palace of silver, 
made for the Gentile nations. Israel Surely the foundation laid in /ion 
Sceived all the favors and the Gentiles shall be beautified as a palace of sil- 
were in the barreness of such as had ver, for a defense a home, joyful 
no prospect of favor. How could there dwelling place. If J:e,be a door, an 
be increase among them? Whafshall entrance shall be given for her ad- 
be -lone for this little sister w ho hath mission into this temple of God, and 
no breasts, not a consolation, not a she shall be enclosed with boards of 
lay or gleam of hope.' cedar, so that in this holy temple far 
Siie shall be spoken for. There is surpassing- the temple built by Solo- 
hinl that the Gentile shall wait for his icon shall .Mount Zion, the joy of the 
law. An outcropping appeals hen whole earth, excelling all other glory, 
and there as a -round of hope thai al 1 because a greater than Solomon 'is 
the qualification is hid in Him who here. The name of the city shall be 
is the Lord of all, whose creative pow- called "The herd is there.'' 
er causes love to spring up where The mother is free, free born, so all 
there was no sign of favor. The siir- her children are free. As the daugb- 
prising mercy, and grace of (rod so ters of Job inherit with their brothers 
great that tliev were as no people, yet equally, as the little one in the gospel 
n shall be said these, where were they, shall become as a thousand, as all de- 
an. I they that were not his people fects shall be gone in the wonderful 
shall be called the people of the living reign of Jesus, as no more envy, nor 
Cod. ami God said. '-Sing' 0 barreu, sorrow, sin. nor death, nor putting 
thou that didst not hear: brea* forth away, as the equality of perfection in 
into singing, ami cry aloud, thou that this one body composed of some of all 
didst nol travail with child: lor more nations coming up from the north, 
are the children of the desolate than the south, the east and the west, with- 
thr children of the married wife, saith oui vliism or h'emish, so shall this 
the Lord." [sai. 54:1. There shall nc wonderfjd body be. THe Jerusalem 
an enlargement of thy tent. Japheth above coming d nvn from Cod out of 
the Gentiles mall dwell in the tents heaven, as a bride adorned for her 
of Shem. [srael shall be cast off it husband, with a pure language, one 
seems until the fulness of the Gentile Lord, one faith, one baptism, even as 
be come in. ye are called in one hope of your call- 
How is all this accomplished. In ing, heirs of God and joint beirs with 
the hand of the Lord the two shall he one Lord .Tesus Christ, singing and 
One. the twain shall be one flesh, the shouting, not unto us. not nnto us. hut 
two sticks shall be one. The things unto thy name be honor, -power, do- 
that in nature were far apart in grace minion and glory forever and ever, 
shall be one. Th.- miracle of grace for thou hast redeemed us by thy 
shall cause the lion and the lamb to blood, out of every nation, kindred, 
dwell together. The middle will of language and tongue under heaven, 
partition shall be removed, and there and hast made us kings and priests 
shall be neither Jew nor Gentile, unto our God fortfver and ever. 



60 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



i££Toww°*tZ£^ ZION'S LANDMARK 

one thing. Hut in the marvel of re- 

demption, the glorious mystery of 

grace the bride of Christ, a great won- "Remove not the ancient landmark 

der in heaven, a woman clothed with which thy fathers have set." 

the Sun, the moon under her feet, and . 

of twelve P d GOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



church of the living God 
and ground of the truth, 
ot, or wrinkle, or any such 
voice, one language, one 
schism, nor discord, nor 



ality, one body where Entered at the postoffice at Wilson as 
es and all the servants 1 class matter. 



forth tht 
}od it 
of tin 



WILSON N. C, DECEMBER L3, 1914. 



and it shall be — 

jrace unto it. EDITORIAL 



P. L). G. 



" WHY ART THOU CAST DOWN, 



MOORE'S MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Last summer my health becann 
ery poor. I went' to Moore's Miner 
1 Springs, in Stokes County, N. C. 
emaining there about 12 days, 1 re 

This water acts on the blood, th'< 



mer. Wahr shipped from Rural Hall, quietude: I 

N. C, at $l-".r>0 per.ca.scoi; 12 half gd- that cause 
Ions ami casds to 'be returned, in 30 All the 

days. castings d 

P. D. GOLD. closer tfaei 

REQUEST. cause Par 

We are in need of money to pay ex- is dark, d 

penses. While war is raging in the that is wit 

East we need money as much as if hidden ma 

there were no war. * We can help each ttrtes the i 

other by paying debts. Please send flesh. Tin 

on what is due on the Landmark, and nipt, eont 

possible, and 'tliis will help to relieve the law of 

v the distress. liis daib 



P. D. G. uew 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



61 



desirable to aim whose conversation quote them more, ami otter them as 

i.s in heaven, from whence we expect authority tor then- positions or eon- 

— look for tiie Lord Jesus. All the tentidns. 

things we see perish. Hence when we is ih.s a safe rule.' is iheie more 
iook at ihe desolation of this corrupi .n some passages oJ God's word than 
nature we are east down. This is no- in some others. When the tempter 
our rest nor dwelling place. The seemingly undertook to instruct and 
things that we see have an end. They aid CimsY in establishing his claim 
make fair promise of good entertain- as the Son of God, pi t aching his con- 
ment, but always to disappoint, ditional system, he said to Jesus. "If 
Hence in this tabernacle we groan, be- thou be the son of God command that 
ing burdened. these stones be made bread,' - Jesus 
Outside of, away from, above, Lade- said to him. It is written man shall 
pendent of, altogether different from nol live by bread alone, but by every 
this corrupt self, and high above as word thai proceedeth out of the 
the heavens are above the ground we mouth oi God. Every word of God is 
tread, is the fountain, the source of good. Nothing in all his word is un- 
onr joy and hope. Hope thou in God, important, but every word of God is 
for 1 shall yet praise him. who is the good and needful, having in ii heaven- 
health of my countenance and my ly food, for the words of Jesus are 
hope. All the sources and causes of Spirit and they are life. If man 
the joy of one 'born of God are in God. should live by every word that pro- 
His thoughts and ways are as ceedeth out of the mouth of God then 
above ours as the heavens are above how can one word of God lie more 
the earth. important than another word of God? 

if we could find solace and comfort What are called by men the scr'.p- 

in ourselves what need would we have urcs which are conditional arc a nec- 

to look above and beyond self for com-, essary portion of God's word, and 

fort and hope.' The things that show have their meaning and importance, 

ns the vanity of all earthly desires, and when written in the heart and 

and that remind us that we should manifested in the life supply food 

• ■all on the Lord for help and hope arc- that is healthy and necessary.' Every 

a blessing to us. word of God is goud. How blessed is 

Hope thou in Cod. O my soul, for the man that considers the word of 

1 shall yet praise him who is the God as good, and that takes heed 

strength of my heart and my hope. thereto. Nothing could be safer than 

There cannot be disappointment to the hen-t persuasion of the truth of 

any that truly hope in the 1 Lord, nor every word of God. It cannot dc- 

that do indeed call on the Lord. ceive nor falesly state any matter. 

P. D, (i. Known unto God are all his works 

from the beginning. Then in the 

GOOD IS TUP: AVOK1) OK THE counsel of the Lord there is safety al- 

LORD. ways. 

When a man considers the import- 
Some people seem to think that ance of the word of God then his life 
some portions of the Lord's word are is squared by that perfect word 
better than some others. As proof of which is infallible and is always true 
this they dwell on some parts more every whe're and in every condition, 
than on some other parts. Owiiii; to When we love the word of God 'We 
the parts thert favor their views they desire to take good heed thereto, be- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



cause there euii be nothing equal to does not change 1 our condition or state 
tlie word ol Uod. There is never else- but only shows what we are. He that 
where such good living as the word is of Uod heareth God's words. Kon.e 
of Uod. The test of worship towards did not hear Uod's word whivh was 
Uod is cibedience to his word. When proof or is proof that they are not of 
we love the word which is sweeter Uod. It is not what Jesus did ,h.u 
than honey and the honey comb, then caused him to he the Sen ol' (iod. but 
there can be no question about keep- being the Son*of (iod his works show- 
ing or giviny good heed to Uod's ed or proved it. -Jesus did not do any 
word. tiling the devil said do. lie could not 
Good is the word of the' Lord teiLfpt any one with evil, nor be tenigjfc 
whether we love it or not. Our esti- ed by evil. 

mate of it does not affect or change Our conduct proves what we are. 

it. But if we are right, or hunger By thy words if good thou shall he 

and thirst after righteousness, then justified, if they are evil thou shalt 

there is nothing so good as the word be condemned by them, 
of the Lord. I\ D. U. 

When the tempter said to Jesus. "If 

thou be the Son of Uod command that BUILDER. 

these stones be made bread," there , 

was an apparent effort to help him. A friend requests my view of Jer. 

The preaching or statements of the 51:15, "lie hath made the earth by 

devil are never as the word of (iod. his power, he hath established the 

For in the word of God there is no lie, world by his wisdom, and hath 

but the devil is a liar and the father stretched out the heaven by his un- 

of lies. He never purposes to do d er standing. " 

right, for there' is no truth in him. What a wonderful, glorious builder 

There is no truth in his doctrines. is the Lord (iod. He built the world. 

There are no conditions of salvation and hath garnished the heavens, and 

contained in the law upon the per- furnished the earth. As the wise man 

formance of which men can obtain Solomon hath said. "Through wis- 

eterual life. Had there been a law dom is an house builded: and by un- 

given thai could give life then rigid- derstanding it is established: And by 

eousness would have been by the law. knowledge shall the chambers be 

The law is infinite in its spirituality, filled with all precious and pleasant 

therefore only one that is spiritual riches." 1'rov. 24, :! and 4th. Wisdom 

could keep it. hath builded her house, and by nn- 

Uod did not say to Adam, if you derstanding it is girded, strengthen- 

will keep the law then you shall five, ed and made sure and abides, and by 

Before Adam transgressed he did not the perfect knowledge of (iod shall 

have eternal life. By sinning he lost the chambers be filled, furnished, 

what he had or was, but if^ it had adorned and ornamented with all 

been eternal life it could not have end- previous jewels and beauties and 

ed. glory. 

The constitution of man's mind is He that built all things is (iod. and 

such that he attaches more value 1 to greater is he than all things he has 

his works than they are worthy of. built. For the heavens declare his 

Pride is the condemnation of the glory, and the firmament showeth his 

devil, and his children or subjects are handy work. But the heaven of heav- 

under that delusion. What we do ens cannot contain the Lord of glory. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



63 



Jn the 51st chapter" of Jeremiah the 
prophet declares (verse lo,j that the 
Lord hath made the earth by Ids 
power, and he has established the 
world by his wisdom, and hath 
stretched out the heaven by his un- 
derstanding, showing that he knows 
all of its mysteries, tor it is his heav- 
en and his earth. Why are these 
v.ouls as apples of gold set in pic- 
tures Of silver plaeed here.' Notice 
what this chapter declares. It con- 

laration of the destruction of Baby- 
lon, the greatest kingdom on; earth, 
and the highest lifted lip in pride re- 
in-lion against (iod, and worldly glory 
and oppression. Israel which has been 
delivered into the hand of mystery 
Babylon, the pride, the glory and vain 
boast of earth. The world gloried in 
her arms, her works, her strength, her 
religion hath lifted up her strength 
against (Jod, and hath made 1 the na- 
tions of earth drink of the 1 wine of 
her fornication. "Babylon hath been 
a golden cup in the Lord's hand that 
made all the earth drunken: the na- 
tions have drunken of her wine: 
therefore the nations are mad," Jer. 
51:7. John beheld in Babylon, tin: 
mother of harlots and the great 
abomination of the earth, the most 
cunning and the' proudest personifica- 

and all nationss were drunk' with the 
wane of her false religion. 0 daughter 
of Jerusalem flee out of Babylon, de- 
liver thyself, come out her my people, 
and be not partakers of her plagues: 
for Babylon is suddenly fallen. 

Now can nol the Lord destroy such 
a, mystery of iniquity* Does he not 
understand all this mystery of cor- 
ruption? Can not he that made the 
earth by his power, establish the 
world by his wisdom, and hath stretch- 
ed out the world by his understand- 
ing, can not this Almighty God fill 
this great Babylon with men as with 



eaterpillers, and shall they not lift up 
a shout against thee.' God can till 
the heavens with waters, and tht ele- 
ments with destruction. 

The portion of Jacob (the Lord 
Jesus ) is not like men of earth, lie is 
(iod's battleax. lie is the stone cut 
out of the mountains without hands, 
that shall break in 'pieces all the proud 
powers of earth, and scatter them as 
chaff of the summer threshing floor 
before the wind. Israel is the rod of 
(iod's inheritance. Out of him 
(Jesus) came forth, the corner, out of 
him the nail, out of him tiie battle 
bough. ou1 ..f him every oppressor to- 
gether." Zech. 10:4. Every thing 
that would oppress and destroy Israel 
is felt, borne, overcome, made an end 
of, destroyed by Jesus, who is the ■ / 
great compierer, who builds his 
church, and the gates of hell shall 
never prevail against it. 

There is no people like Israel, the 
Lord's peculiar treasure, whom he 
loves. How great is the Lord's good- 
ness and his mercy to Israel. 

Jesus the builder hath built the 
church fitly framed together, out of 
material from every quarter of the 
earth, out of the depths, from the 
hcigths. polished, beautified, fitted, 
each one in its place, so that it is fitly 
framed together, and groweth up into 
a holy temple in the Lord, budded for 
a habitation of (iod through the Spir- 
it. His wisdom has built it, his power 
and understanding hath perfected it, 
so that it can never be destroyed, Ids 
knowldge has so garnished, furnished 
and beautified il that it outshines all 
glory of man. He has stretched the 
curtains of his glory so that all beauty 
and glory forever adorn these man- 
sions of glory, where nothing unclean 
shall ever come, ami no decay shall 
ever be known. Tt is the building of 
God eternal in the he'avens. 

P. D. G. 



64 



2I0N 's i,, wdm \i;k. 



THE WAV, THE TKUTH, AND THE 
LIFE. 

"Jesus saith unto hini, I am the 
way, the truth, and the Life: qo man 
cometh unto the Father bul by me." 
John 14:6. 

These words were uttered just be- 
fore the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. 
Whal he had just said to his d seiples 
had filled their hearts with sorrow; 
thai Jesus spoke just before his de- 
parture as recorded toy John had 
filled their hearts. John 16:6. When 
the word of Jesus dwells in the heart 
of. his followers they have one heart. 
•'Sorrow hath tilled your heart." But 
if the word of -Jesus makes his people 
sorrow, a healing shall follow. He 
hinds up the broken hearted, it was 
because he said. 1 go away that they 
thus felt, and Peter desired that they 
also might go with him. They could 
not go then. He must go alone, but 
he went for them. He trod the' wine- 
press of the wrath of God alone. No 
man could go with him, but he went 
for them. It was expedient, necessary 
for them, for their good, that he 1 
should go. He went to prepare a 
place for them. If he went he should 
come again and come to his people, 
and receive them unto himself, that 
they should be with him and behold 
his glory. 

He said to them, "In my Father's 
bouse are many mansions." While 
his train fills the temple it is not 
crowded. Each member has his home 
or place, and not one is out of place. 
God is a Cod of order. The heritage 
is a good one for every member of his 
body. While it is not crowded there 
are no vacant places or mansions. God 
is Hie dwelling place of his people in 
all generations. 

If our earthly house of this taber- 
nacle were dissolved we have a build- 
ing of Hod, an house not made with 
hands eternal in the heavens. IN 



THE HEAVENS. There is a rest re- 
maining to followers of Jesus in the 
church of trod here. Jesus said to the 
Gadarene out of whom he had cast a 
legion of devils, Go home to thy 
friends, and tell them what great 
things the Lord hath done for thee, 
and hath had mercy on thee. That is 
a resting place, a home, a mansion. 
We sit together in heavenly places in 
Christ Jesus. How good to dwell to- 
gether in him in the unity of the 
Spirit. As we fail here we are re- 
ceived in everlasting habitations or 
sure resting places in Christ Jesus. 
When Jesus was crucified he passed 
<»ut of time, went into death, rested 
according to the commandment a -per- 
fect rest, because his work was fin- 
ished. The vail of the temple was 
rent from top to bottom, showing Hint 
the 1 way into the holy of holies which 
is heaven was not open while as yet 
the first tabernacle was standing. Uiit 
when Jesus had finished the work he 
came to do under the first tabernacle 
(the law) and the last thing death 
passed upon, Jesus who was put to 
death in the flesh, and thus sin was 
finished which brings forth death, 
God raised him from the dead to die 
no more, for he ever liveth, having 
ascended to heaven, showing the way 
into heaven is open, and that way is 
Jesus who is the way, the truth and 
the life. 

Jesus went to prepare the place for 
them, the mansions of retet in the 
Father's house. Thomas saith unto 
him, Lord, we know not whither thou 
goest, and how can we know the way? 
Jesus gave the perfect answer as all 
he said and did M as perfect. This is 
the high way of holiness leading 
through the desert. Naturally no 
way can be made through the great 
desert, because the wind will fill the' 
road with sand. But this is a high 
way so perfect that nothing unclean 
can pass over. No lion's whelp, or 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



63 



ravenous or hurtful beast, shall ever 
go thereon. Nothing that ever de- 
stroys or harms can ever pass over 
that way. No vulture's eye can ever 
see it. None ever die in that way. 
Sorrow and sighing shall liee away: 
Jesus is the way, the truth and the 
life. No man can come to the Father 
hut by hun,. Then tlieie 1 is no way but 
this perfett way. 

The earthly house of this tabernacle 
must be' dissolved. Flesh and blood 
cannot inherit the kingdom of God, 
neither 'doth corruption inherit incor- 
ruption. To inherit is to enter into 
legally, lawfully, rightly. While this 
earthly house of this tabernacle 
stands we cannot occupy or enter into 
the 1 heavenly building. Corruption 
cannot inherit ineorruption. The be- 
liever receives the spirit of adoption. 
But he must be absent from the body 
before he is present with the Lord. 
Moses must die at the word or mouth 
of the Lord before Israel could pass 
over Jordan under the leadership of 
Joshua. This corruptible must put 
on ineorruption, and this mortal must 
put on immiortality. Je'sus shall 
eibange our vile body. 

While here on earth our conversa- 
tion, our life, our citizenship, our 
hope, is in heaven whence we expect 
the Lord Jesus to come; and when he 
comes he shall change our vile body 
that it may be* fashioned like unto his 
glorious body, according to the work- 
ing whereby he is able to subdue all 
things unto himself. So that Jesus 
shall come again and receive his peo- 
ple unto himself, so that where he is 
they shall be, and as he is finally shall 
they also be, and thus being ever with 
the Lord they shall be satisfied when 
they awake with h,is likeness. 

P. D. G. 



I have made an arrangement for a 
rery nice Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. G 



END OF YEAR. 

This issue of Landmark eloses the 
year 11)14, of its publication. Truly 
it is an eventful year. The fury and 
bitterness of war with its distress un- 
to poverty and death, the' scourge of 
nations, has raged, -and is still raging. 
True is has not fallen upon us, but 
we. are feeling some of its fury. 

in our own country .there are pros- 
perous crops, and exemption from 
pestilence, jwith the countless mercies 
of the God of long suffering and great 
goodness. We are surely unworthy 
of the least of all these mercies. 

There is always great encourage- 
ment to hope in God who rules the 
times and seasons, and whose require- 
ments of us are a reasonable service. 

The state and condition of the ) 
churches is about as usual. Peace pre- 
vails among the churches of the 
saints. We are not plagued with new 
thin-gs to fret and oppress Israel. We 
desire to abide in the 1 goodly tents of 
Jacob, and rest at the feeding places 
as of old, being content to dwell 
among our own people, and fare as 
they do. Having obtained mercy of 
the Lord we continue to this present 
time. 

P. D. G. 



"Let us draw near with a true 
heart in full assurance of faith," 
Heb. 10:22. 

How far above the worship under 
the law, or first testament, is the 
worship in the New Testament. The 
priesthood under the law made noth- 
ing perfect. The priests did not con- 
tinue by reason of death, because they 
had infirmity, nor were consecrated by 
an oath, and we're of the covenant of 
works, and of a tabernacle made with 
hands, and of a temple of which every 
stone must be thrown down. 

But Jesus came by a greater coven- 
ant wherein God remembers our sins 



60 



ZTON'S LANDMARK. 



and iniquities no more. Jesus was 
made a 'priest alter the order of Mel- 
ehisedec, without beginning of days 
or end of time', and made by the oath 
of him that cannot lie, and made 
priest after the power of an endless 



life, who offered 1 


LimselJ withe 


ait spot 


to God ; and havi 


ug put away 


sin by 


the sacrifice of hii 


nself he abid 


eth for- 


ever. His blood c 


leanses from 


all sin, 


ami by his blood 


he enters 


hea veil 


He enters heaven 


by a new an< 


1 Living 


way which is open 
He is of the ta 


through his 
bernacle whi 


flesh, 
ch the 


Lord pitch, .,1 and 


not man, 


which 


hath foundations 


whose build. 


"r and 


Makfcr is God. II 




cut out 


without hands, an 


d became a 


great 


mountain. Jesus 


said, "Destr 


oy this 


temple, and in tin 


•ee days I wi 


ill raise 1 


it up." A body W£ 


is given or p 





for him. He jwas not of the 1 earth. 
There was no material of earth in 
his body. It twas not a tabo'rnacle to 
be taken down. He entered heaven, 
the holy of holies, which is heaven it- 
self by his own blood of the 1 New cov- 
enant, and ever lives in heaven for 
his people. This sanctuary is holy. A 
glorious high throne from the begin- 
ning is the place' of our sanctuary. 
This is the tabernacle which the Lord 
pitched and not man. Jesus ascended 
on high having led captivity captive 
and given gifts unto men. Wherefore 
brethren, having boldness by the blood 
of Jesus to enter into the holiest by a 
new and living way. which he hath 
consecrated for us through the vail, 
that is to say his flesh, and having a 
high 'priest over the house of God how 
blesse'd and holy is this worship, this 
hope, this joy, in the Holy Ghost. Tf 
ye then be risen with Ghrist seek 
those things which are above, where' 
Ghrist sitteth on the right hand of 
God; set vour affection on things 
above, not on things on earth, be- 
cause ye *rd dead and your life -'<= i>; ] 
with Ghrist in God, and when Christ 



who is our life shall appear then shall 
we also appear with him in glory. 

The strength by which we come to 
"Christ is all of him, and all in him. 
The weakness and inability of the 
creature displays the glorious, saving 
healing power of the priest who is 
able to save unto the uttermost or 
completely them that come uuto God 
by him. *' 

P. D. G. 



IS IT RIGHT. 

Elder Gold:— I have read your 
Landmark and still I need more in- 
formiation. Tell me plc'ase, is it right 
to have denominations again. By 
what name should the Followers of 
our Lord -lesns Christ be called'? 

Searching after truth, 

S. II. DRAUGHjON; 
Scotland Neck, N. C. 

REMARKS : — One Lord, on Father, 
one Baptism, even as ye arc called in 
one hope of your calling, see Eph. 4:- 
4-6, and other places showing that 
the church of God has her dwelling 
in God, is of God, and followed of 
Jesus Christ. 

We do not consider that the church 
of God is to be conformed to the 
world. The doctrine the true church 
holds came from God through Jesus 
Christ, has never been changed. The 
people of God in their spiritual or 
right mind desire no change in doc- 
trine, no new doctrine, nothing taken 
from nor added to the doctrine re- 
ceived through the' Lord Jesus. These 
people were first called (did not so 
name themselves.) christians at An- 
tioch. Tt is good if we so follow the 
Lord Jesus that we' are called his 
followrs. Names are as old as man, 
The name of the Lord Jesus is named 
upon his people. They'are often call- 
ed Sons of God. and are 1 called by a 
new name which the Lord hath named. 



. ZION'S LANDMARK. 



87 



John the Baptist is named as a 
name well authorized. There are so 
many kinds of Baptists that of course 
one that is the first could properly be 
called Primitive Baptist. Hence the 
name that we are known by. But 
God's people are one. There is only 
one 1 church of Jesus Christ. The foun- 
dation of God standeth sure, having 
this seal, the Lord knoweth them 
that are his, and let every one that 
nameth the name of Christ depart 
from iniquity. There is but one true 
foundation, and that is the Lord 
Jesus. 

Cod's house is one, his church is 
one. built Jiv and upon Christ Jesus. 

P. D. G. 



Obituaries. 

MIOSES DEW. 

Moses Dew was the son of Larry 
I Jew and his wife Nancy. 

He was born on the 12th day of 
April, 1838. and died- Oct, 14th, 1911. 
He |was the last one of a large family 
of sixteen children, eleven sons and 
live daughters. He was a soldier in 
the Confederate Army, and a great 
admirer of General Lee 1 . 

He looked after the poor wounded 
soldiers on the battlefields, and ad- 
ministered to their wants, and re- 
lumed home without a scar. In later 
years he took great delight in meeting 
the old soldiers and conversing with 
them about the 1 narrow escapes they 
had while serving in the time of war. 

He lost two brothers during that 
war; one was brought home after im- 
prisonment and died soon after reach- 
ing home. 

The other was killed in battle. The 
parents of this large family died dur- 
ing the war. Moses Dew >vas married 



in the spring of 1866 to Miss Spicy 
Ann Ellis. To them were born four 
children. One died in infancy ami 
Ins oldest son, Larry Dew, died Nov. 
1.3th, 1913. In May, 1875, his home 
was made lonely by the loss of his 
near wife, leaving him to care for 
three small children, the baby being 
only nine months old. 

He succeeded in securing the ser- 
vices of a good old lady as housekeep- 
er for him, till he was married the 
second time, in the Fall of 1877, to 
Miss Medie E. Williford, and to them 
one son was born. They lived happi- 
ly together till the end came. He 
joined i he Primitive Baptist church 
at Wilson, N. O, in 1889 or 1890 and 
attended the services regularly as 
long as he was able to go. He very 
much enjoyed the visits of his breth- i 
ren. His parents were members of 
this same church. 

He was a useful and active man, 
taking delight in doing what he could 
for the 1 poor and afflicted, till about 
a year before his death he fell, after 
which he failed rapidly. He was on 
the street near his house when he was 
attacked with blindness and fell, after 
which he was never able to walk. He 
bore his afflictions patiently and 
seemed grateful to his busy wife and 
others who waited on him. He quiet- 
ly passed away, leaving a devoted 
will', three children, and 17 grand- 
children to mourn his absence. 

SAL LIE BALLANCE. 



A. F. WHITLEY. 

With a sad heart and in much weak- 
ness I write a notice of the death of 
my beloved husband, A. F. Whitley. 

lie passed away Nov. 30, 1914, mak- 
ing his stay on earth 72 years and 11 
months. 

He was a devoted husband, leaving 
a widow — the 3rd wife and 8 children, 
and many grand children to mourn 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



his loss, though we feel that he is at 
retet now where there is no warfare, 
nor tribulation, nor will be forever. 

He suffered 7 weeks with paralysis, 
but bore his sufferings with patience. 

His remains were laid away at Sal- 
eln church. His funeral was preached 
by Elder W. A. Simpkins. 

The church at Salem has lost a de- 
voted member for forty years, and 
for years he was a deacon. 

WINNIE A. WHITLEY, 

His Wife. 



MRS. ANNIE WR KiHT. 

Nov. 10th, death visited the home 1 
of Mr. W. L. Wright, and took his 
wife, Annie S. Wright, 

She was the only daughter of W. 
I F. Rice and Martha E. Rice. She was 
the mother of 5 sons, 3 of whom sur- 
vive her. 

Annie 1 was true and faithful to her 
husbands — not weary in well-doing. 
While her home is destitute of a 
mother her husband knows how hard 
it is to give her up. 

We hope she is at rest with the 1 
Lord. I dreamed about 3 weeks be- 
fore she died the sun rose in a very 
. strange 1 looking cloud, i e.^'oke im 
mediately and heard some one in the 
east singing the resurrection day is 
drawing near. When it was time 
for the sun to rise I looke'd to see and 
it rose just as I saw it in my dream. 

Annie had been sick about 2 months. 
I heard three days before her death 
that she was blind. She 1 died of 
Brights disease of the kidneys. 

She leaves behind a husband, three 
sons, a step mother that is almost 
blind, and one brother in this un- 
friendly world. I am the only aunt 
on the mother's side. 

Your sister in hope of eternal life. 

ALZADA HARRISON. 
Burlington, N. C. 
(Primitive Baptist please copy.) 



LINA HALL. 

Died at the home of Mrs. Lillie 
Thomas, our aunt, Lina Hall. 

She 1 was the daughter of the late 
Thomas and Sarah Hall, and was born 
and raised in Jones county; was born 
July 22, 18-17, and died August 28, 
1914, making her stay on earth 67 
years, one month and four days. 

She was sick several months with 
Brights disease, and all that loving 
hands and medical aid could do, was 
done for he'r, but of no avail. The 
Lord saw tit to take her to a home of 
peace and happiness, and she passed 
away as quietly and peacefully as a 
light going out. 

Aunt Lina was a good woman, and 
' believe that she is enjoying that 
sweet rest of heaven with all of her 
dear one's that have gone on before. 
She was a member of the Primitive 
Baptist church at White Oak, Jones 
county, for several years, always fill- 
ing her seat when possible 1 . 

We hope by the grace of God to be 
prepared to meet our loved ones in 
the' lia'pny beyond when this day of 
life is done. 

Written by her neice, 

REN A ERVIN. 



WENDELL HOLMES LINVILLE. 

Tn loving memory we desire to se'e 
some record in the Landmark of our 
baby, Wendell Holmes Linville, son of 
Robt. F. and Lillie M. Linville. 

He was born March 31, 1011, and 
died April 30, 1914; making his stay 
with us .3 years and 30 days. 

He 1 was most of the time an invalid, 
but when health would permit he was 
lively and playful. His childish talk 
and tricks would entertain many that 
formed his acquaintance, and will 
ever be cherished recollections of 
father, mother, two little brothers and 
two litt'e sisters. We Will ever fe'el 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



grateful to our sympathizing neigh- 
bors and friends who extended a help- 
ing hand in time of needs, also to Eld- 
ers w llliard and McMillan, who ad- 
ministered the funeral services with 
kind and consoling words. We mourn 
over his ahsense. We checrish the 
thought 6? a reasure in heaven. 

We visit the place we 1 laid his body 
away to moulder back to dust, and 
,'iace a flower and also drop a tear 
on the little mound that is so sacred 
to us ; hut we must say. 

Sleep on sweet Wended, and take your 
rest ; 

God has called you. lie knows best. 
Written by his father. 



ELIAS MILLS. 

The subject of this notice, Elias 
Mills, was born July 4th, 1850, in 
Franklin County, (la., and was the 
son of Red in Mills, who died in above 
county and State a short time before 
Elias was horn. He' died of cancer of 
the stomach. 

For some time before his death he 
was very much concerned about of- 
fering to the church which he did on 
Monday after the 1 2nd Sunday in Aug. 
last,, was received and baptized by 
Elder Walter Edwards on 5th Sunday 
of the same month. 

Though sorely afflicted, he seemed 
anxious to go into the liquid grave. 
He dated his first evidence back some 
thirty years and related his hope, 
very much to the comfort of the 
church at Jerusalem. Anson county. 
N. C. 

His death occurred the 1st of Nov. 
1914. He underwent an operatoin at 
a hospital. For a short time it was 
Imped he would recover. Such hopes 
were, however, blighted. He was the 
only brother of the writer, and I feel 
very lonely. Ib' was buried at our 



home the day following his death. 

The funeral services were conducted 
by Brother \V. (J. Edwards. 

J can't express what my feelings 
were w hen 1 looked upon him for the 
Lasi time, hut can but say peace be 
thy s:eep dear prother till the will of 
(iod shall mature for the awakening 
of his chose'n people of all time and of 
every nationality under heaven. 
Bro. Gold, please 1 correct errors and 
publish what you will of the above. 

Yours, 

J. F. MILLS. 



Deal" Brother: — Please let me ask in 
the first issue of your worthy journal 
that its leads will no longer send or- 
ders to tlie undersigned for the little 
pamphlet, Salvation Alone Through 
Chrisl the Lord, hut to our dear breth- 
ren, Elder Sylvester llassell, William- 
son. .Martin county N. C. and to Eld 
er \i. W. Thompson, Greenfield, Ind. 
The state of my health makes it neces- 
sary for me to do this. I am surprised 
and thankful that so many copies of 
the little work have been called for, 
Showing that its Title, as least, is the 
key-note of our dear people. 

Thtrough the Father's mercy (I 
Ihink it was) 1 was able to complete 
the treatise in a second part of like 
size, which the dear brethren named 
will also distribute. A word from me 
in regard to them would be quite out 
of plare; their names are written in 
Heaven. The present time seems 
almost bewildering. The dear Lord 
Kelp each one to listen for the mid- 
night cry, "The Bridegroom Com- 
eth." 

With love and fellowship to all who 
love 1 the Lord, a brother poor and 
needy. 

S. B. LUOKETT. 
Crawfordsville, Indiana. 



Send us your printing-. Work done 
neatly and promptly. P. D. G. 



to 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



J. P. VIA. 

Buffalo, Vs. — Ian. 2 and 3rd, 1915. 

Spray, N. C— 4. 

Macedonia — 5. 

Wolf Island— 6. 

New Hope— 7. 

Pleasant Grove — 8. 

Arbor— 9 and 10th. 

tLyneh's Creek— 11. 

Prospect Hill— 12. 

Ebenezer — 13. 

Stories Creek— 14. 

Koxboro at night— (14.) 

Helena— 15, 

Durham at night— (15.) 
AVadesboro — 16 (2 p. m.) 
Lawyers Spring — 17. 
High Ridge— 18. 
Liberty— 19. 
High Hill— 20. 
Union Grove — 21. 
Watson— 22. 
Pleasant Grove— 23. 
Jerusalem. — 24. 
Jones Hill— 25. 
Liberty Hill— 26. 
Bear Creek— 27. 
Punning Creek— 28. 
Meadow Creek— 2!). 
Concord at night — (20.) 



LASSES $ I OC J REWAHD!iM;T?r, 

Nur,-,.,,,,,! "M.,,,!!,!. ' , .. : ; 1 [ , . ■ - 

'•):x\«' N" li.'.rinl'r ■.iu'. 1 -7,:, Cr. ■ wi 1 li w or';'. '*.»,! 

$!..>; r)...il.l.-s:...| >■■■•■<■■■! ' : 1 ' ■ I ■ ■ 

Dr. J. R. Southingtor, hcmcdy Co., 5b f.iain ft. Kansas City, t..o. 



CHANGE OP ADDRESS. 

Elder J. T. Collier's address is 
changes from Ke'nly, N. C, R. P. D. to 
Micro, N. C. 



SEND US YOUR WORK. 

We print your Minutes, Book and 
Job Work at short notice and with 
neatness and despatch. 

Send us your work. 



NOTICE. 

Bro. W. R. Dodd, Whitmell, Va., 
has kindly offered to send in subscrip- 
tions for The Landmark, and those 
desiring to subscribe or renew their 
subscription can give him the money. 
A receipt card will be mailed to each 
direct for amount paid. 

P. D. G. 



The Greensboro Nurseries. John A. 
Young & Sons dwners, report that this 
Pall season opened with a rush of or- 
ders. During the first 30 days after 
the season opened thely shipped out 
more than 8,000 orders, many of them 
calling for 1,000 trees to the order, 
and that their salesmen continue to 
send in orders from points that were 
previously canvassed. This shows 
that our people are alive to the im- 
portance of planting fruit, shade and 
ornamental trees. 



ENTERTAINING BOOK 

I! you wish to read a highly enter- 
book of about 80 pages — price 
cents — descriptive of characters 
:tl t ; Lie and falr.;e, as set forth in th« 

send for this book. 
Address 

ELDER P. W. KEENE, 
North Berwick, Maine. 
(>i fder the book from me. 

P. D. GOLD, 
Wilson, N. C. 



fN PLACE OF DRAWING WATER. 
By Frederick W. Keene. 
Allegorical Narratives for the in- 
struction and comfort of Babes in 
Grace. 

Neatly bound in cloth, 50 cents per 
copy, or five copies for $2.00 postpaid. 

Can be had from the office of Zion's 
La nrl m ark or from Elder Frederick 
W. Keene, North Berwick, Maine. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



FOR GOOD CHEAP FARMS COME 
TO MIDLAND, VIRGINIA. THE 
LAND OP GREATEST OP- 
PORTUNITY. 

Best of health, school and colleges, 
markets and shipping facilities, lands 
lie smooth and free from stone, well 
Watered and productive from $10 per 
acre up. Producing corn, grain, hay, 
splendid stock raising propositions 
and no better bright leaf tobacco land 
anywhere. All we ask is to show you. 
Come and be convinced. Send for 
• booklet No. 20 today. R. FREDER- 
fCKSON & CO.. Rlackstone. Va. 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Nerves. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

CONNER SVILLE, IND, 

R. No. 1, Box G., 

Agents Wanted. 




"RHEUMATISM" 
Cured to Stay Cured 
By One Who Had it 

My Dear Reader: — - 1911 - 

I am an old lady nearly 90 years old. 
My life's work among the sick i nearing 
its end. At the age of 50 I was terribly 
afflicted with rheumatism; I suffered un- 
told agony for nearly five years. I have 
been a herbist, nurse and student of 
roots and herbs for nearly 70 years. I 
diagnosised and formulated a cure that 
cured me, and it never returned. I have 
treated nearly 7500 rheumatic sufferers, 
some of the most pitiful cases imagin- 
able; I effected cures in practically every 
case. I want you to read my treatise on 
the "cause and cure" of rheumatism. 
"Don't suffer"; it is easy to get well. My 
treatise is FREE; send for it today; you 
will then know what to do, and how to 
do it. Sicerely yours, 

LYDIA E. SMALL. 
L L.-2 % Fenway Station, Boston, Mass. 



FOURTEENTH EDITION OP SHAPE 
NOTES. 

We are getting out the Fourteenth 
Edition of Shape Notes of our Hymn 
and Tune Books which will soon be 
ready for distribution. The price is 
70 cents each, sent by mail, and six 
d hilars per dozen sent by express at 
cost of purchaser. 

There will be sent with each book, 
upon request, without additional cost, 
a neat pamphlet of 30 pages, contain- 
ing rudiments of music, and graded 
lessons for use in singing classes, in 
connection with the Hymn and Tune 
Book. Send orders to Elder Silas H. 
Durand> Southampton, Pa., or Elder P. 
G. Lester, Floyd, Va., or to Elder P. D. 
Gold, Wilson, N. C. 



An Only Daughter 

Relieved of Consumption 

When death was hourly expected, all remedies 
having failed, and Dr. H. James was experiment- 
ing with the many herbs of Calcutta, he acci- 
dentally made a preparation which cured his 
only child of Consumption. He has proved 
to the world that Consumption can bo positive- 
ly and permanently cured. The doctor now 
gives bis recipe free onjj asking two 2-cei>1 
stamps to piiy c.i^iz.i^^a. This herb also 
cuK-s Night Sweats. Nausea at the stomach and 
will break up a fresh cold in twenty-lour hours 
Address Craddock & Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa- naming this paper. 



72 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



THREE BOOKS OF INTEREST. 

Have You Read Them? 
Eiographical History of Baptist 
Ministers 

containing nearly 1000 sketches, 3S1 
pictures of Ministers, Deacons and tal- 
ented Sisters, together with an Appen- 
dix of much useful information — 
Price $2.00. 

Also Theodosin Ernest, The Heroine of 
Faith, and Ten Days in Search 
of the Church 

both these books in one volume and 
contain 637 pages. No work of its size 
and cost is a better defense of Bible 
doctrine and practice, or sets the one 
church Christ built in fairer colors. 

Price $1.25. 
These books are well printed on good 
paper, substantially and neatly bound, 
and above all they are highly endorsed 
by Elders Hassell, Cash, Thompson, 
Gold, Waters, Dalton, Chick, Hurst, 
Webb, Lester, Cayce, Branscome, Nor- 
ton, Stewart, Henderson, Hanks, Dnr- 
and, Daily, Moore, Oliphant, Lundy, 
Morris, Hardy, Raulston, Pope, Mew- 
born, Gilbert, Farmer, Denny, Elkins, 
and hundreds of other ministers and 
editors the country over. 
As long as they last both volumes will 
be sent together for $2.75 and if you 
are not pleased with your purchase 
thev may be returned in good order 
and money will be refunded. 

Send all orders to 
R. H. PITTMAN, Luray, Va. 



FOR INFORMATION. 

For information and for reference 
we would be pleased to have a Minute 
of every Primitive Baptist Association 
in America and will thank the Clerks 
of the various Associations to forward 
one to me at their earliest 
convenience. 



FOR RHEUMATISM AND 
NEURALGIA 

Drink ten gallons of the celebrated 
Shivar Mineral Water, shipped from 
Spring— only two dollars. Money 
cheerfully refunded on return of emp- 
ty demijohns if you say it failed to 
relieve. Enthusiastically endorsed 
by leading physicians and citizens as 
America's greatest curative water. 
The same guarantee applies to Scia- 
tica, Nervous Headache, Stoamch, Liv- 
er and Kidney diseases. Address 
Shivar Spring, Box 55 T, Shelton, S. 
C, U. S A. 



■ A \mm mmmsmm " 
WEBSTER'S 
NEW 

INTERNATIONAL. 
DICTIONARY 

THE MERR1AM WEBSTER 

The Only New unabridged dic- 
tionary in many years. 

Contains the pith and essence 
of an authoritative library. 
Covers every field ot knowl- 
edge. An Encyclopedia in a 
single book. 

The Only Dictionary with the 
New Divid&d Page. 

400,000 Wordi. 27CO Pages. 
6000 Illustrations. Cost nearly 
half a million dollars. 

Let us tell you about this most 
remarkable single volume. 

F^ Sr "-''' ' .! j lr a 'K Write for sample 
ticulars, etc. 
Name this 
paper and 




c 

ZION*S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 
A T 

wiLt^^N, n o i! t Hi Carolina 
Prtmiive or Old School Baptist 

VOL .Xg 7 in. Wilson, N. C, JAN. 1, 1915. NUMBER 4. 



P. D. GOLD, Editor WOmtm, N. 6 

P. O. LEETEJi, Am: Editor PloyA, 

$1M PEE YEAR. 



V. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 



"Ask for the eld paths where ie the geod way." 

By tSie help of the Lord this paper wilJ contend for the 
ancient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and 
strengthened by its eords of lore. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, 
and regard only the Bible as the standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey 
Jesus, the King in the Holy Hill of SSion, keeping them- 
selves unspotted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the 
blessed Comforter. 

KOTI01I 

When a subscriber desires bis paper changed ke should 
state plainly both the old and new postofiees. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what is due, and else 
aisie hiis postofiiee. 

Let each subscriber pay for bis paper in advance if pos- 
sible, and when he renews giye.the same name it has been 
going m, unless be wishes it changed, then he should abate 
both the old and the new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted, please inform 
me of it. When you can always send money by money order 
o? cheek, er draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after bis name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agent*. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it-— if 
so impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers 
a? truth. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should bo sent to 



P. ». GOLD, V iieon, R € 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



SOWING AND REAPING. 

He that soweth to the flesh, shall 
of the flesh reap corruption, but lie 
that soweth to the spirit shall of the 
spirit reap life everlasting. Gal. 6-8. 

There 1 has been, of late, among 
Primitive Baptists, some disputation 
as to the ability of man in respect to 
the exercise of spiritual tilings. Some 
seem to hold that man-kind are p&fcire- 
ly passive, or in other words, absolu- 
tely impotent until moved by the 
spirit. Others claim that in regene- 
ration, an individual is invested with 
every quality necessary to enable 
him thereafter, to live a spiritual life, 
and that his " temporal salvation de- 
pends, conditionally, on his exercise 
of these gifts, independent of the ac- 
tive influence of the Spirit of God. 
This doctrine is so far from according 
with my experience, that J do not love 
it any better than I do the pure arm- 
inian system, fit makes the Spirit 
subject to man, rather than man sub- 
ject to the Spirit, ^t- denies, to the 
regenerate, who is supposed to be 
poor in spirit, the guidance and sus- 
taining grace of the Spirit, and ac- 
cords to the individual the power to 
direct his steps, and makes him his 
own keeper and preserver. 

1 will not enlarge on this new in- 
vention which seems to be a crafty 
method of turning the faith of re- 
geaerate people into a channel that 



leads away from the true source of 
their strength and contidence. 

But 1 do not intend to go to the 
opposite extreme of holding that 
Christians are entirely passive in ob- 
edience, nor in every sense absolutely 
impotent until moved by the Spirit. 
To reconcile this, is the main object of 
this article. 

I believe there is a three-fold sense 
in which the bible treats on life. 

First, there is natural life. Second, 
there is spiritual life, and thirdly 
thmv is eternal life. By natural life, 
one is endowed with physical powers 
and qualities, such as to enable him 
to act and move without external 
force. He is also able to learn obed- 
ience to laws and commandments. 
Therefore if he is told to do a thing 
within the limit of his ability and un- 
derstanding, he need not wait to l>3 
moved by the Spirit. 

For instance, if we are commanded 
to assemble ourselves together for 
worship, and we have covenanted to 
do so. and if we are blest with proper 
surroundings, we should go in the 
obendience to these things without 
waiting for a special motion of the 
Spirit. It is true that I usually have 



tha 



to 



duty, I nit much ot the time it is so 
impalpable that I have to feel my way. 

The ap stle says, "I beseech you 
brethren that ye present your BOD- 
IES a living .sacrifice, holy, acceptable 



74 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



to God, Which is your reasonable ser- 
vice." 

Herein, 1 believe, man is not wholly 
passive m obedience. God has blest 
us Willi life and physical strength lo 
do this, that is, to 'present our bodies 
a living .^acritice, and in doing this 
lie has promised us his Spin; We 
should note 1 the difference Letweon 
the sacrifice and the offering. 

Our bodies are not fit for an of- 
fering. Spiritual things only, are ac- 
cepted of God. The body is to be 
PRESENTED as a sacrifice. It ap- 
pears that we cannot make 1 an accep- 
table offering without cost. See 1st 
Chron. 21-24. I believe it accords 
with the experience of christians. Be- 
fore they can offer an acceptable ser- 
vice to the Lord, they must make a 
sacrifice, either of their time or sub- 
stance 1 . 

But it doesn't follow that after we 
have presented our bodies a sacrifice, 
that we can prepare our hearts for a 
spiritual offering. "The preparation 
of the 1 heart &c, is from the Lord." 
Physically, we may present our bod-" 
ies, but this is all we can do. "We 
ought to meet together in the confi- 
dence that having obeyed that which 
is enjoined upon us, he will give us 
his Spirit. This is, 1 think, sowing to 
the Spirit. Failing to do that which 
is "our reasonable service," we sow 
to the flesh and of the flesh reap cor- 
ruption. 

In sowing to the Spirit, we, of the 
Spirit, reap life everlasting. 

I believe there is a sense in which 
we may, in this life, reap spiritual life 
in measure as the reward of our lab- 
ors. This is not strictly eternal life, 
which is the gift of God through 
Jesus Christ. This eternal life is not 
the reward of the works of man. But 
to be spiritually minded is life, and 
peace, and by living in obedience we 
may reap life everlasting. In quality, 
it is as the life in eternity, but in 



quantity it is reaped in small measure 
in this life. 

It is the •"drawing water out of the 
wells ot salvation." It takes effort to 
reap or to draw water. God has set 
up little sanctuaries on earth where 
we may meet together and through 
the spirit, enjoy spiritual ruamiesta- 
tions. In oider to enjoy this spiritual 
life, we must sow to the Spirit. The 

essence of the Kingdom of God is 
righteousness and peace and joy in 
the Holy Ghost. 

When we are free from those who 
see, ii to have strife, and to lord it over 
the rights of others, and when we 
have gifts that labor in the interest of 
peace and unity of the spirit, there is 
no 'place on earth to compare in love- 
liness with these little assemblies. 
Here, the bread and water of life are 
taken in measure sufficient to sus- 
tain spiritual life. But it is in the re- 
surrection that the saints will enjoy 
eternal life, with all its attributes in 
its fulness. 

In regeneration, we have the earn- 
est of the Spirit, which is the seal 
of our redemption. Eternal life is as 
eternity itself — as a river that cannot 
be passed over, boundless in extent, 
and in everything that tends to hap- 
uiness and bliss. 

It seems like conditionalism, to as- 
sert that we may sow to the flesh or 
to the spirit and reap according as 
we sow. I accept it as true, because 
it is affirmed in the scripture. 

I believe in God's foreknowledge, 
and that he has purpose in all he does, 
or permits to be done. Nothing can 
happen inconsistent with God's fore- 
knowledge of it. Although God has 
given us certain powers, yet we are 
impotent — not because we have no 
nower, but because we are subject to 
higher 'powers. God has created and 
ordained powers. 

Tn our fallen stf+e, if left to our- 
selves, we are subject to the powers 



MON'S LANDMARK. 



75 



of Satan, aiid we aa tar ally sow to 
me fresh, ll God withdraw his spirit 
irom us. This he does to try us. 

V* e are delivered over to feaiau for 
the destruction of the tlesh, but God 
has decreed the limit to which we are 
subjected. V\ e are by this means 
chastened, made to suffer, and by it 
uu learn obedience. As God reigns 
omnipotent over all other powers and 
beings, there is left no uncertainty, as 
lo our obedience, for he works in, 
and among us, so although we reap 
spiritual life in obedience, yet our 
obedience is of him, and not of our- 
selves. 

(iod works actively in restraining 
the excess of men in their wrath, and 
rarual and evil works, and also, in 
;onstraining his elect to do works of 
obedience, so that "all things work 
together for good to them who love 
God." 

In this connection, I desire to point 
out what I humbly conceive to be a 
mistaken idea of predestination. Some 
of our brethren seem to attribute to 
the decrees, the certainty of all 
things. This is a mistake. God's eter- 
nal decrees (more properly called his 
purposes) make nothing come to pass 
of fatal necessity. 

The certainty of all things pur- 
posed, depends on the exercise of the 
•power of God, who works all things 
after the council of his own will. This 
he does, both by restraining the acts 
of the unregenerate, and by working 
in his peopl both to will and to do. I 
will make my view 'plain by an in- 
stance. The time of every being on 
earth, is appointed of God. Notwith- 
standing this, all natural beings and 
things are subject to time and chance. 

In themselves considered, they are 
subject to casual accidents and even 
premature decay. If this is true, 
what makes it true that they will con- 
tinue till the time appointed? 

Tt is the exercise of the providence. 



grace and mercy of God, and not of 
any fatality in the decrees. 

J. ELLlb BuANTON. 



COMMUNICATION. 



Apostles 


and Eld 


lers and 


send < 




into the 


which al- 




entiles in 


and Syri 




icia : For 






it certain 



; fr 



Brethren 
brethren 
Antioch 
as much i 
which we 
you with wore 
souls, saying, ye 
and keep the la^ 
no such comma 
good unto us, being 
one accord, to send 
you with our belove 
Paul, men who have 
lives for the name o 
Christ. We have sen 
and Silas, who shall 
things by mouth. Pi 
to the Holy Ghost, 
-upon you no greater 
necessary things, tl 
from' meats offered t 
blood, and from thii 



must be c 
7 : to Avhoi 
ldment : 



3 iroubled 
ing your 
■cumcised, 

we gave 
c seemed 
led with 
men unto 
ibas and 
led their 
ord Jesus 
ore Judas 

the same 
med good 
us', to lay 
than these 
i abstain 
and from 



whici 



shall ( 



3d and 
if ye 
1. Fare 



ye well." Acts 15:23-29. 

For some cause I feel indebted to 
my brethren on the subject of Idola- 
try. From the above quotation we 
observe that the apostles when they 
assembled to consider the teaching of 
the observance of the law as a means 
of salvation did, with one consent, 
object to that as being a part of the 
gospel of our salvation, and wrote 
the above as the law by which Zion is 
to be governed. That was the last 
Ecclesiastical Legislature that ever 
assembled on the earth and its con- 
clusions are the last laws by which 
the church is compelled to be govern- 
ed. One of the conclusions here is 
that "You abstain from meats offered 
to idols." Not only from idolatry it- 



76 



zion's landmark. 



self but from the things 
them as a sacrifice or feast 
We should define what 



creature of God to be a 
deu says that an idol 
much indulged. Webt 



the Fi 



■ Hi 



have so little regi 
the Lord and hav 



tions or hopes. 1 know of no better 
definition than that and therefore will 
have to rest the case there. 

Now, therefore, we conclude that 
any thing that is to be taken in the 
arrangement of salvation as a doer or 
as a helper to the Lord Jesus is an 
idol. 

Recently I read in the Sunday school 
Magazine, June, 1914, of the M. E. 
'Church" South, Page 357 as follows: 
"It is often said that when God wants 
to do a great work He always raises 
up a great man for the occasion. But 
is that really a correct statement? Is 
it not rather true that God always 
does great things when He can lay 
His hands on one whom He can use in 
accomplishing His ends? For it may 
be said with all reverence that even 
divine power cannot make a great 
man to order. Man is a free agent: - 
and for whatever use He would make 
of us God must wait upon our willing- 
ness and ability to co-operate with 
Him." Who is greatest here, man or 
God? God would do something and 
use man in that doing but He must 
wait for man's "willingness and abil- 
ity." This paper is of great author- 
ity with that people and they send it 
forth as a teacher of the young folks, 
even the children of some Primitive 1 



little control 
ten thai they turn them 
leir own. way into every 
'oi ship of tiiis evil day 
the ways of ungodliness 
aught in the above ex- 
that paper. 

in The Senior Class 
1. 8, No. 3, Ayden, N. C. 
o Teachers, 1st page. 

occur to you that the 
'ritual health of your 
on your preparation of 
M ore than this, their 
y is also dependent on 
half of the people who 
schools are never saved 
ases because the teacliers 
re up to their possibili- 
es in preparing and presenting the 
uths of the Bible." 
Now what is this but idolatry? If 
e partake of this kind of stuff we 
•e worshipers of idols. If we eat of 
eir feasts we are eating of me'ats of- 
red to idols. This is the thing 
hich we are strictly forbidden to do 



do 1) 



The apostle James te'lls the churches 
that "Every good gift and every per- 
fect gift is from above, and cometh 
down from the Father of lights with 
whom is no varableness nor a shadow 
of turning." Therefore 1 every source 
that we depend upon for any of these 
gifts either good or perfect, (natural 
of spiritual) except God alone and in 
the way that He has purposed that 
these things should be given is idola- 
try. Any of our people who are 
partakers with them in these things 
are 1 idolaters in their eating and 
drinking. This is why I am writing 
this letter. Onr brethren are told to 
bring up their children in the way 
they should go, and to train them up 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



77 



in the nurture of the Lord. To turn 
them, over to these institutions of men 
is not to train them up in the nurture 
and admonition of the Lord. On the 
other hand it is to train them up to 
depend on the institutions of men 
and to ascribe to the man honor that 
belongs alone to God. Talk to them 
about it and you will find out that 
they have let their children have the 
ropes in the family until they have 1 no 
control of them and they are more 
subject to the children than the chil- 
dren are to them. In this way there 1 
are being raised up among us a people 
of the following description: "This 
know also, that in the last days per- 
ilous time hall come. For men shall 
be lovers of their ownselves, covetous, 
boasters, proud, blasphemers, disob- 
edient to parents, unthankful, unholy, 
without natural affection, truce' break- 
ers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, 
tlespisers of those that are good, trait- 
ers, heady, high-minded, lovers of 
pleasure more than lovers of God ; 
having a form of godliness, but deny- 
ing the power thereof ; from such turn 
away." 2nd Tim. 3:1-5. 

Not four years ago a minister of 
the M. E. church told his congrega- 
tion that there is one thing that God 
cannot do, He can not control man un- 
less man would submit ^himself into 
His hands. Just this week a minister 
told the people that there had been 
preaching enough in the mooting 
which he was helping to conduct to 
snvo rvery sinner in the county and 
state in which ho was preaching. At 
Oklahoma C'tv in May, the bishop told 
those who were there that the church 
was in the stead of Christ to save sin- 
ners. Now if all these things are so 
the work of Christ is nothing. Tt all 
lie* in the hands of man to be saved 
or not just as he will. If the work 
of the Lord was of any value His peo- 
yle are saved and all these other 
things are idolatry. If the church is 



worshiped or put in the place of the 
Lord in any way it lias become an idol 
and ceases to be the church. This is 
where Rofflte' came from and all who 
teach that way show themfselves to be 
of the great whore. Why cannot the 
Primitive Baptists see these things? 
Is it because our ministers are so ten- 
der or afraid that they fail to tell the 
whole truth. Then shame be on them. 

I want to copy an article by our 
late brother. Elder F. A. Chick, which 
may be found in the Signs of the 
Times in Sept, 1895. 

"SUNDAY SCHOOL." 
"Can Old Baptists allow their chil- 
dren to attend the Sunday Schools of 
the enemies of the truth consistently 
With allegiance 1 to the God of heav- 
en?" 

The above question has been pro- 
posed to us of late, and our views 
asked concerning it. In reply we feel 
first like saying that we have be- 
lieved that Ave should be committing 
a sin against God should we allow our 
children to attend the Sunday schools 
which are all around us. We dislike 
to speak of ourself directly in any 
way, but perhaps Ave shall be pardon- 
ed if here and now we say that we 
have not and do not send or allcAV 
our children to go to any of the Sun- 
day schools in the village Avhere we 
have lived for tAventy seven years. 
We do not mean to say that they haA'e 
never been in a Sundry schod as vis- 
itors. Perhaps once or twice a year 
they may have been present in this 
Way, just as now and then they may 
go to hear Arminian preaching. We 
s^v this by Avay of personal explana- 
tion. Our children knoAV, and we 
think fully understand that We think 
it wrong for them to go where A\-e 
would not go ourseh T es. 

Tt seems to us rloar beyond all 
questions that if it be Avrong for us 
as Old Baptists, who believe that we 



78 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



are the church of God on earth, to 
hold Sunday schools of our own for 
the instruction of our children in the 
letter of the truth, it is a much more 
Unspeakable wrong to help sustain a 
Sunday school where false and flesh- 
ly doctrines are taught by sending 
our children to them. We hardly 
know hoiw to go about arguing this 
matter, it seems such a self-evident 
proposition. It certainly is wrong to 
encourage and help sustain anything 
that is wrong. If Sunday schools in 
themselves were not wrong, certainly 
false teaching in them is wrong ; and 
to sustain or encourage what is wrong 
is to be partakers of that wrong. 

So long as we believe in salvation 
by grace, and in all those 'principles 
of truth that are necessarily connect- 
ed with it, we must believe that to 
teach children or any one else that 
they can of themselves repent and 
turn to God, that salvation depends 
upon man's own w T ork or choice, that 
salvation is offered for man's accept- 
ance or rejection, that by teaching 
children or men can come to know 
and serve God and finally be saved, 
that the Sunday school is the true and 
proper nursery of the church of God, 
and that by Sunday schools or any 
other training, children can prepare 
for heaven, is to teach falsehood of 
the deepest dye. Such are the things 
impressed upon the children's minds 
in every Sunday school in our land. 
How then can we, who believe in and 
love salvation by grace, consent to in. 
any way whatever support that which 
at every step denies our faith 1 / If our 
children whom God has placed under 
our charge, are allowed by us to at- 
tend upon such teaching, we are en- 
couraging it and helping to sustain 
it. We are denying the Lord, to whom 
and to whose finished work this sort 
of teaching gives the lie direct. 

Still another reason forces itself up- 
on our attention. Sunday schools, as 



well as all other things need mone\ 
to help them along, 'the children are 
ail asKed and expected lo bring at 
least a penny every feunday. true a 
penny is but a small thing in itself, 
but we remember once when two 
mites were more than great riches. In 
as small a thing as a penny a great 
principle may be involved. \\ e nave 
no more right to contribute a penny 
toward the support and advancement 
ol untruth than we have to contribute 
a thousand dollars. If our children 
attend a bunday school they will not 
want to appear mean. If other chil- 
dren bring their penny so will they 
desire to do so ; and the pennies must 
come from the parents, How can 
we, as consistent Old foehool .baptists, 
pay our money to support what we 
do not believe in! li men believe in 
.Sunday schools as a good thing, then 
let them do what they can to support 
it, but let us not violate our own con- 
science by helping on what we be- 
lieve to be falsehood. We do not 
seek to interfere with those who be- 
lieve the Sunday school to be right, 
except that we would show them the 
unscripturalness of their teaching if 
we could, but we do feel like urging 
hat we keep our skirts clean in this 
matter. 

We have heard it urged by some 
who have allowed their children to at- 
tend such places in defence of their 
course that it can do them no harm 
to go. With this we must take direct 
issue. To be taught to embrace false- 
hood of any kind injures any body. 
We think it better that our child 
should be a Galio, who cares for none 
of these things, than a Caiaphas, filled 
with false religion, and therefore the 
deadly enmity to the Saviour and His 
cause and His people. False religious 
teaching turns a Galio into a Caiaphas 
and we remember that Jesus once said 
to the religious professors of His 
day, "Ye compass sea and land to 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



7'J 



make one proselyte and when lie is 
uiaue you rriaKe him two ioid more 
ine ciiiitl or neri than their teacheis. 

\>e nave arvvays felt glad that Ave 
were not allowed when we were a 
child to be subjected to such proseiA c- 
mg inrluenccy, and we owe a debt ot 
gratuud to our parents in this re- 
bfpeat which we never can repay or ex- 
press. How can we say that it will 
uo our children no harm to be sub- 
ject to the inliue'nce of falsehood, un- 
less we are ready to contend that it is 
no harm to a person to be made two 
rold more a child of hell than his 
teachers. We do not pause' here to 
consider what this language of the 
Saviour in Matthew xxiii. 15, may 
mean. At all events it is something 
harmful and to be deplored. 

We have heard it said by those 
who would justify their course in this 
matter, "The Lord can bring them 
back, and if he has chosen them to 
salvation he will in his own good 
time." Thanks to the mercy and 
grace of God, this is true. A Saul of 
Tarsus is not beyond the power and 
grace of God. The Pope of Rome 
himself could be humbled by the 
grace of God. There is nothing too 
hard for the Lord. He can ever give 
repentance to his crying and disobed- 
ient people. All this is true, and we 
have reason to bless and praise his 
holy name for this great truth every 
day of our lives; but shall we there- 
fore presume upon His power and 
grace? 0, may it ever be our prayer, 
"Keep back Thy servant also from 
presumptuous sins; let them not have 
dominion over me." Because God 

saves our children from ruin, shall 
we therefore hurl them over the preci- 
pice, or suffer them to fall over if we 
can prevent it? The only question 
for us to consider in this matter is 
this, What is the will of God? How 
shall Ave glorify Him? It is not what 
aan God do nor what will He do, but 



what is right for us to do ! is it right 
lor us to allow our children to attend 
tne Sunday schools oi the enemies of 
Oud and riis truth.' We say r\0! 11 
it is right, let some one show that it 
is. rs it right to let our money and 
inriuence go to the support of the 
wrong \ bo that the enemy gets our 

our declamations against him. Ac- 
tions speak louder than words. We 
can never tell how pained we have 
been once or twice in our lives, when 
we were presenting our views upon 
the quc.suoii of Sunday schools, to be 
met with the remark in reply, "You 

tist, and his children attend our Sun- 
day school." Even our enemies see 
the inconsistency of preaching against 
Sunday schools and at the same time 
sending our children to them. There 
can be no half way about this matter. 
11 i hey are wrong they are wrong, and 
if it be wrong to let our children go 
into any wrong thing, it is also wrong 
lo let them go into this wrong thing. 

Still farther, if we desire that our 
children shall grow up despising us 
and our religion, the best and easiest 
way to go about it is to send them to 
our enemies to be taught. If Ave have 
any regard to the future comfort and 
peace of our households, if we desire 
that our children shall be a source of 
plej an and comfort to us in the fu- 
t; ire, we shall avoid, as we would the 
deadliest foe, that which will (ill them 
with the spirit of persecution of our 
holy religion. The deadliest foe that 
We know to day to the cause of God 
and truth are the children of some 
Old School Ba'ptist parents Avho Avere 
raised in Sunday schools of their 
enemies. They have become a thorn 
in the sides of their parents, regard- 
in-- them and treating them With no 
respect. What a man soavs that shall 
he rean. We have heard of some such 
children saying, "Father and mother 



80 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



are opposed to Sunday schools, but 
they let us go all the same." In other 
words the children mock their par- 
ents, and learn to despise their pro- 
tession. The enmity of the natural 
heart of man is sufficient of itself, 
without being fanned into a liame of 
persecution by being subjected to 
lalse religious teaching. 

For these and other reasons that 
could be alleged we, must say that Old 
School Baptists SIN when they en- 
courage or support the Sunday schools 
of the enemies of truth, either by al- 
lowing their children to attend iheni, 
or by contributing of their means to 
their support. 

As for excuses that we have heard 
alleged, such as, "My children must 
have society, and it is lonesome for 
them at home 1 , and they think it hard 
if they cannot be with other chil- 
dren," they are not worth consider- 
ing. They do not furnish the shadow 
of justification for allowing their chil- 
dren to engage in this wrong thing. 
If to do 1his thing is wrong, that is 
the end of it. Nothing can justify it. 

C. 

] do heartily endorse every word of 
the above except that hjs children 
went once or twdce a year just as com- 
pany. That was a wrong. 

1 believe in dealing kindly with 
children and not threatening them 
with hard treatment but to be kind 
and positive with them so they will 
know your meaning without threat- 
ening them with the rod. 

A child who truly loves the father 
and the mother will have regard to 
their wishes and not go contrary to 
them in these false things. 

I know of young folks now whose 
•parents are Primitive 1 Baptists but 
who gave' way to them to attend Sun- 
day schools, who say, 'My father 
don't want me to go to Sunday 
school but I am going all the same." 



Such children are a disgrace to 
their parents and it is the fault of 
the parents. There was a time wheft 
if they had used their authority in a 
kind, but hrm manner the children 
would not have gone into this enmity 
against their parents and the truth. 

1 pray Almighty God to keep us 
from the hand of those who hate us 
and to teach us to walk free from this 
terrible idolatry. Surely the image 
which the king se't up in the valley ®f 
Shinar was no more an idol nor half 
so great an enemy to God and godli- 
ness as these modern Sunday schools. 

With love to the household of faith 
and a true desire for their good, I am, 
Yours in hope, 

L. H. HARDY. 

P. S. — I lack language to express 
my indignation of these things. 

H. 

Atlantic, N. C. 



TOUR. 

DearyBrother Gold, and readers of 
Zion's Landmark. Having been re- 
quested by soti.e to write something 
concerning my late visit to the Asso- 
ciations in eastern North Carolina, I 
will say that I was favored to attend 
the .Kehukee, Contentnea, White Oak 
and Black Creek Associations, as well 
as several other meetings, all of which 
was a pleasure, and I met many who 
are dear brethren and sisters in the 
Lord. I would like to mention them 
all. and tell of their kindness to me. 
but perhaps this would not be profit- 
able to the readers of a - paper pub- 
lished for the benefit of the Lord's 
humble popr. I was and am in a spec- 
ial trouble of such a nature as to 
make me know that T never knew 
trouble before, and yet the Lord in 
much mercy gave me to enjoy all the 

of the preaching T luvrd. and also 
gave me sweet liberty of soul most of 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



81 



the times 1 was called upon to speak 
ai ins ueur name. 

On uie -idi Sunday in Oct. at the 
JilacK CreeK Association, 1 think i 
saw more people listening to pleaching 
than 1 ever saw at one time, and the 
order was excellent, and all wno tried 
could hear, .till tiic preaching that 1 
heard on this trip, as well one to the 
.Lower Country Line, Upper Country 
Line and Abbott's Creek Associations 
in August, was, 1 think, according to 
t lie word of Cod, and in line with that 
which Old Baptists have preached 
and believed as far back as I have 
known them. Nothing new lo dis- 
turb the peace and fellowship of God's 
people'. Thanks to the Holy Spirit that 
takes of the things of Jesus and 
shows them unto us. The brethren 
who preached seemed full of the soul 
comforting doctrine, Jesus and the 
resurrection. 

Brethren of North Carolina, you 
have a great deal to be thankful for, 
you are sound old fashioned Baptists, 
and if you will take it from a weak 
brother like me, let me exhort you to 
still contend earnestly for the faith 
which was once delivered to the 
saints, and beware of any man or any 
paper that may go among you depart- 
ing in the least degree from the beat- 
en paths of the fathers. In the per- 
sons of Elders (J old and Hassel, you 
have two editors who are true and 
humble servants of the 1 most High 
Gotl, and their papers bring no new 
thing, but always contend for those 
precious things which the Saviour 
of sinners has graciously taught in 
your hearts. After the Black Creek As 
sedation 1 filled two appointments at 
Wilson, one at Falls, one at Roberson- 
ville, one at Norfolk, Va., all of which 
were pleasant, and I reached home on 
the 30th of Oct., and found all my 
chi dren and church folks well as us- 
ual, and all gave me a warm welcome 
kome. I was glad to get back to my 



loved ones again, but home is now a 
very lonely place, and so it is where- 
ever 1 go. 1 know my Cod doeth all 
things well, and can only as"k him for 

Brethren and sisters, pray for me. 
i our brother in tribulation, but I 

trust also in the fellowship of the gos- 

i JOSHUA T, ROWE. 

J04 Linwood Ave., Roland Park, 
Baltimore, Md. 



STRENGTHENING. 

Dear Bro. Gold : — The dear old 
Landmark's visit is like showers of 
blessings to me, one, who is not per- 
mi.ted to listen often to his sacred 
word proclaimed from the stand. Old 

tance I live from the church prevents 

tilings combined make the visits of 
the Landmark more precious: for in it 
[ feasl upon the good things it con- 
tains. In it 1 feed upon the different 
experiences of the people of God, and 
it brings comfort and some degree of 
hope i i a poor, unworthy frail creat- 
ure as 1 am. Then your editorials are 
as a light unto my footsteps helping 
to make plain some of the blessed 
truths contained in his Holy Word. 
1 remain your unworthy sister, 
PATSY A. LEWIS. 
South Creek, N. C. 



COMMUNINGS. 

Dear Brother Gold: — I have just 
finished reading your letter in the 
Landmark in answer to the inquiry of 
Dr. Hooper, and it has indeed been a 
feast to me, written as it was some 
time before I was born. It brings so 
forcibly to my mind that the God we 
love is the same yesterday, today and 
forever, and that His ministers in all 
ages proclaim the same glad tidings 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



of the gospel of Christ. Through Him 
we are saved, and through no good 

in the Leas* part. If 1 am not de- 
ceived altogether, and know anything 
in truth, 1 have in mercy received 

1 1 enjoy your writing so much. 
1 hope the Lord will bless you in all 

V our ^unworthy sister, 

MRS. WILLIE R. HINES. 
Goldsboro, N. O, R. F, D. 



J. P. VIA. 

\ — ran. 2 and 3rd, 1915. 



New Hope — 7. 
Pleasant Grove — 8. 
Arbor— 9 and 10th. 
Lynch 's Creek — 11. 
Prospect Hill — 12. 
Ebenezer*— 13. 
Stories Creek — 11. 
Roxboro at night— (14.) 
Helena — 15. 

Durham at night — (15.) 
Wadesboro— 16 (2 p. m.) 
Lawyers Spring — 17. 
High Ridge— 18. 
Liberty — 19. 
High Hill— 20. 
Union Grove — 21. 
Watson— 22. 
Pleasant Grove — 23. 
Jerusalem — 24. 
Jones Hill— 25. 
Liberty Hill — 26. 
Bear Creek— 27. 
Running Cree'k — 28. 
Meadow Creek — 29. 
Concord at night— (29.) 



Send us your printing. Work done 
neatly and promptly. P. D. G. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



"itemove not the ancient landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 

F. D. UOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



VOL. XLVI1I. NUMBER 4. 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson as 
1 class matter. 



WILSON, N. O, JANUARY 1, 1915. 

EDITORIAL 

Elder P. D. Gold:— if you will par- 
don me tor asking a little favor of 
you, i will ask you to give me your 
vie'ws of a short dream winch has 
been on my mind since 1 dreamed it 
a couple of weeks ago. it is as fol- 
lows : 

My wife and myself were walking 
li'p the road, and we came to a wagon 
which some one had left standing in 
the road, and as we came directly up 
to the rear of the wagon 1 Heard a 
most pitiful bleat of a lamb. On 
examining 1 found in the wagon, the 
lamb tied, both front and rear feet — 
securely tied. I reached in and pulled 
the lamb to the lvar of tne wagon, 
took out my knife ;md cut uie cords 
which bound it, lit'td it to rue 'round, 
and it was so weak and starved that 
it could scarcely stand. 1 assisted it 
until it could walk, and it seemed, 
somehow, to appear to be so very 
thankful to me for giving it its free- 
dom, i awoke and I could then, and 
can yet, see so very plainly the lamb 
and the cords, and the wag»n ; ' hut 
1 cannot arrive at am' interpretation. 



!10N'S LANDMARK. 



83 



1 beg to remain your unworthy 
brothei. 

W. B. DQDD. 

1 ilot, Va. 

REMARKS : — deeding sheep and 
ljunlis is >i work Jesus commanded his 



personal sowing, not in the soil of 
earth, but in the good or evil re- 
sponses to his own personal conduct, 



sin 



preaching or feeding 
is peculiar. Sheep are not to 



be oppressed, nor neglected, bound, 
nor starved. They are dependent. 
I hey ; re me flock of God which he 
has purcnased with his own blood. 

The Lord, tire good shepherd, loves 
his sheeu, and gave his life for them. 
They have ninny enemies, and are 
helpless, rhose who love them truly 
feel unfit to feed them, nor can they 
Peed them of their own ability. But 



that 



enahl 



h s servants to feed the 
You felt relieved win 
released the lamb. Its « 
shown to vou. Take the 
self. 



i-eeeive the fruit, the 
own doing, whether § 



S hath 
id. 2nd 



Cor 



Id . 



Ihi 



bad. If 
of his 
he shall 



e things 
to that 
: good or 



What do men receive that are dead 
n trespasses and in sins? Do they 
•eceive according to their works, 
consider Roman's '2nd ehap. and 
nany other scriptures.) 

Does this apply to nations of the 



of 



RE IPING AS THE SOWING. 

"For whatsoever a man soweth, 
thai shall he also reap," Gal. 6:7. 

We know that naturally what one 
sows he also reaps. If one sows wheat 
he expects to reap wheat, or the same 
in kind. Tf he plants corn he looks 
for a return from the earth of corn, 
or a crop of the same kind. There are 
no contradictions in nature. Every 
seed brings forth of its own kind. 
Men may cheat, defraud, vacillate, de- 
ceive, hut God does not. We cannot 
think even that he will lie. Whatso- 
ever a man sows that shall he also 
reap from the earth that responds 
plentifully to a bountiful sowing; yet 
so that man shall look to God for the 
increase. 

Tn the higher order of sowinjr, name- 
lv as to the fruit he reaps from a 



>e judged 
God shal 



i he that 
■ighteous- 



law shall 



:12 



g every work into 
judgment, with every secret thing, 
whether it be good or evil, Eccl. 12:14. 

In the gospel dispensation God com- 
mands all men every where to repent, 
and has committed all judgment to 
his Son Jesus Christ, and hath given 
this assurance unto all men in that 
he hath raised Jesus Christ his Son 
from the dead, See Acts 17:30-31. 

Jesus Christ will raise all men from 
the dead, whether believers or unbe- 
lievers. John 5:28-29. 

Let us consider the nations of the 



84 



zion's landmark. 



rth briefly. Do they reap 



been watching each other 
I studying war, and pre- 
it, or sowing that sort of 
ews and ferments in their 
reacts on the parties them- 
( angles them in the evil 
5 that lurk in those that 
dl this is sowing to the 
i they become involved in 
e and then they re'ap the 



in strength or strategy, and, cultivat- 
ing this feeling day after day, he will 
become anxious for a trial of his 
strength, and he will challenge an- 
other for a trial of strength, or insult 
him, thus provoking him to fight. 
Likewise nations will ponder such 
things as war and conflicts or trials 
of strength. They will ponder over 
these things, and prepare for them 
for years, drill the'ir men, train them 
to fight, sow seeds of that sort in their 
minds, seek such" things, harbor them 
in their thoughts ; impute to others 
the things they are doing themselves. 
Jt is a law of our corrupt nature when 
we mean and intend evil to think those 
we do not love or properly e'steem are 
doing the very thing we are doing. If 
we intend to do wrong the evil we are 
doing we suspect others of doing. But 
if we purpose to do right we think 
others mean to to do right. Thus 
what we sow we also reap, whether it 
be good or evil. 

Take the en so of the Eureopean na- 
tions now in the bloodiest strife 
known of in modern times. We won- 
der what started this war now so gen- 
eral and so furious. For years these 



I am niorLified to read that so many 
of our so-called statesmen, writers on 
morals and whal they call progress 
are now clai toring for the United 
States to arm themselves for war. Has 
it not been the wise policy of our na- 
tion to sow to peace, to cultivate the 
principles cf freedom, and rejoice in 
liberty, and pursue the paths of quiet- 
ness, and cultivate good will toward 
men, and avoid entangling alliances 
with other nations, and nourish the 
noble purpose of peace, doing unto 
others as we would have them do un- 
to us? Should not our banner be one 
that emblazons the enobling, peace- 
able, righteous principles of peace on 
earth, and good will towards men, 
that will give glory to God in the 
highest, and, instead of increasing our 
military armor in building vessels of 
war, and forts from which to belch 
from the cannon's mouth death and 
destruction to our neighbors, let us 
put on the armor of honest, fair deal- 
ings towards men, the protection of 
the rights of all peaceable, loyal citi- 
zens, the shunning to place burdens 
of taxation that increase poverty and 
discontent, and set an example of 
such righteous living we' shall appeal 
to our neighbors to emulate us in that 
sort of behaviour that commends the 
institutions that shall proclaim Amer- 
ica is the land of the honestly brave, 
and the home of the truly free-born. 

What shall be said of such that sow 
to the Spirit and of the Spirit reap 
life everlasting? To them who by 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



85 



patience in well doing seek for glory 
and honor and immortality God be- 
stows eternal life, Blessed are they 
that hunger and thirst after righteous- 
ness, for they shall be tilled with the 
iru.t of righteousness aud peace i'i 
the Holy Ghost. 

P. D. G. 



GREAT DAY. 

Brother W. F. Garner requests my 
view of Mai. 4:5, 6. 

"Behold, I will send Elijah the 
prophet before the coming o c the 
great and dreadful day of the Lord. 
And he shall turn the heart of the 
fathers to the children, and th.i heart 
ol' the children to their fathers, lest I 
come and smite the earth with a 
curse." 

John the Baptist is that prophet, 
the greatest prophet born of woman. 
He is called Elijah here. He came in 
the spirit and power of Elias the great 
reformer, who called down fire from 
heaven to rebuke the wickedness of 
Ahab, and slay idolaters, and over- 
throw false worship. 

John stood nearer to Jesus than 
any of these prophets as they were 
far otf, but John nigh to the great 
day of the coming of the Messiah. 

John preached that the kingdom of 
heaven is at hand. Jesus was then 
in their midst, but who should abide 
the day of his coming? He is the Sun 
rising with healing in his wings. He 
is a refiner's fire to burn chaff with 
unquenchable fire, consuming all the 
corruption of the idolatrous. He is a 
fuller's soap to wash away all the 
filth of that corrupt people. 

He shall come suddenly into his 
temple. They will not be looking 
aright for him, nor be prepared for 
him, nor will they desire him. They 
will show the corruption of their 
hearts and lives by rejecting him to 
their hurt and destruction. Tt is a 
dreadful day to evil doers. 



How wretched to be so blinded by 
the gods of this world as to reject the 
true God. The exposure Jesus makes 
of their perverted service, the over- 
turning of the tables of money 
changers, the scourging of these de- 
tilers of God's temple by making it a 
den of thieves, the scorching lash of 
rebuke administered upon those that 
sat in Moses' seat full of hypocrisy, 
and as whited sepulchers full of dead 
mens hone's, a foul carcass whose 
stench cried up to heaven for the ven- 
geance of God to be poured out upon 
them. Alas who may abide the day 
of his coming? 

Their pride has judged that he that 
would come would be so full of carn- 
alisin as to flatter and honor them as 
the custodians of the law and the 
prophets. 

"What will he do to save a remnant? 
He shall turn the heart of the fathers 
to the children. Who are the fathers? 
Such as Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, 
who possessed the faith of God's fav- 
ored ones of old. He would turn their 
heart. They had one heart — the same 
heart, one desire, a true desire. He 
should give the children of these 
fathers then living (such as the little 
flock whom Jesus chose.) to the 
fathers. These children should also 
have one heart made true and pure as 
a new lieart that believed the truth. 
These children should sit down wilh 
Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the 
kin-dom of (rod, lest the Messiah 
smite the earth with a curse. The faith 
of the fathers, such as the patriarchs, 
should dwell in the children; hence 
the curse shoxild be borne by Jesus 
and the blessings should dwell with 
them. 

John came neither eating bread, 
nor drinking wine; and ye say he hath 

ing and drinking: and ye say, "Be- 
hold a gluttonous man and a wine 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



bibber, a friend of publicans and sin- 
i u-rs, ' Luke 7 :24-35. 

John piped unto them and they had 
not danced. John, greater than any 
prophet, came in the simplicity of 
truth, sounding in mucis that gre'eted 
ears that heralded the coming of the 
Messiah. To be sure this was sound- 
ing in most joyous notes the coming 
of the Just One. Yet they had not 
dance'd nor responded with joyful 
dance before the Lord. How vigorous 
Avas John's preaching as it sounded in 
the wilderness of Judea, "Repent ye, 
kingdom of heaven is at hand. The 
rulers rejected the kingdom of God 
against themselves, not being bap- 
tized with John's baptism. Yet 
heaven owned it. Jesus himself was 
baptized by John. He was the great- 
est prophet born of woman, yet the 
least in the kingdom of heaven was 
gre'ater than John. The least one 
born in the kingdom of heaven was 
greater than the greatest one born 
of woman. Then how wonderful is 
the kingdom of heaven. Still the 1 Jews, 
to whom Jesus came, his own, reject- 
ed him. He mourned to them, but 
they wept not. They said, "The 1 Son 
of man is come eating and drinking : 
and ye say, Behold a gluttonous man, 
and a wine bibber, a friend of publi- 
cans and sinners." So neither of the 
two ; one 1 the greatest of the prophets, 
and of him they said he hath a devil. 
No good word had they for either 
one. They did not rejoice nor dance 
at the coming of John, nor did they 
mourn at the humilation of Je'sus. 

They were contrary to all men. The 
day of the Lord's visitation was lost 
to them, and they are lost to the glad- 
ness of the coming of the Son of mar;, 
the Son of God. 

The saddest of all things, the dark- 
est of all blindness is the loss of the 
glorious coming of Jesus Christ in the 
flesh. The greatest of all crimes is the' 
killing of the Prince of Peace with 



wicked hands, and the imprecation of 
all the Jews, 'His blood be 1 on us and 
on our children, ' ' Matt. 27 :25. 

P. D. G. 



"And Enoch walked with God: and 
he was not: for God took him." Gen. 
5 :24: 

Enoch was peculiar. He walked 
with God. How near to God was his 

He was the seventh from Adam — i 
a full rounded life of faith. How 
complete was his walk. Nothing sep- 
arated him from God. He walked with 
God. He was near to God. Enoch 
drew near to Cod — came to him. He 
that cometh to God must believe that 
he is, and that he is a rewarder of 
them that diligently seek him. 

Without faith it is impossible to 
ple'ase God. Then if one has the faith 
that fully persuades him of the bless- 
edness of drawing night to God, so 
that his soul is satisfied with the joy, 
love and bliss of God's companion- 
ship, that one is kept in perfect peace 1 . 
Nothing separates him from the love 
of God in Christ Jesus our Lord. 

What enemy could mar the peace 1 
of one who walks with God. The 
enemy which is the king of terrors, 
and the terror of kings could not 
come nigh to Enoch. He did not see 
death, nor feel it. 

He was not — not in the world, not 
in the reach of any enemy, not alarm- 
ed. He was translated. HE WAS 
NOT— not in earth, not on earth. 

Mose's died at the word or mouth 
of God. Elijah was caught up to 
heaven. Enoch was translated, taken 
out of the state of man, and lifted in- 
to the presence of God where there 
is no darkness at all, no night, none 
of the tilings that vex or disturb mor- 
tals. 

What mortal knows any thing of 
that wondrous condition of change so 
that he is not — as he was. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



87 



When Joseph's brethren were re- 



ruption, when tins mortal shall put 
on immortality, when death shall be 
swallowed up of life - He shall change 
this vile body, aud fashion it like un- 
to the glorous bouy of the Lord Jesus. 
Where is mortality then'.' Where is 
sm when it cannot be founds Their 
sms and iniquities God will remember 
no more. He makes an end of sin and 
death. The sin of Judah shall be 
sought, but it is not found. It is made 
an end of. 

Communion with Clod is 'the most 
blessed state that lifts the 1 happy oue 
out of all sorrow and woe into that 
glorious translation that forever ban- 
ishes all that is vain and mortal. 
Hence no man knoweth such whose 
life is not hid with Christ in Cod. 

Faith is the substance of tilings 
hoped for, the evidence of things not 
seen. All the glory that the quicken- 
ed soul thirsts for is found in Cod, 
the fountain of happiness and eternal 
peace. With him is eternal bliss, at 
his right hand are pleasures forever 
more. This is having the life that 
now is and that is to come. 

P. D. C. 



JANUARY 191 :.. 

Time Flies. 

"My days, my weeks, my months, my 
years, 

Fly fast as the whirling spheres." 

Yet it is not my time. What do we 
have of our production? Our sins 
and our iniquities are what we have 
that cling to us. 

"Your sins and your iniquities have 
separated between you and your 
God." 



What have we that we have not re- 
ceived? 

If one has good works he is indebted 
to the Lord who works in his people 
both to will and to do according to his 
-ood pleasure. But he does not work 
in men to do evil. 

Every good gift, and every perfect 
gift cometh down from above, from 
ac l ather of Lights. 

iOne says all my times are in his 
hand. His bounty causes us to enjoy 
countless mercies. It is well for us to 
feel and to know that Cod's goodness 
is showered upon- us. While we know 
not what a day nor an hour may bring 
forth, yet we hope in Cod for th» 
continuance of his mercies. He tnai 
brought us into the world keeps and 
preserves us in all our existence ; nor 
is there another to whom we can go 
or look for guidance and protection 
P. D. C. 



WATCH. 

The 13th chap, of Mark let us con- 
sider. 

1st. The disciples call the atteutiun 
of Jesus to the famous building of the 
temple. It was to them so wonderful 
is structure, and devoted to the wor- 
ship of God. Mankind are ^rone to 
worship such structures, not looking 
at things not seen, but at things seen. 

If our religion is a glorying in our 
performance, or members, or our 
knowledge, it is false. God is a spir- 
is and they that worship Him must 
worship in Spirit and in truth. If any 
man glory let him glory in the Lord. 

2nd. The answer of Jesus. There 
shall not be left here one stone upon 
another that shall not be thrown 
down. As he sat upon the Mount of 
Olives Peter and others said, tell us 
when shall these things be, and what 
shall be the sign of their fulfillment? 

He sat on the Mount of Olives. Soon 
he should be placed between the up- 



8S 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



per and nether mill-stones, and press- 
ed as a cart loaded with sheaves, and 
as the olive is pressed that the oil may 
now, the Son of man shall be oppress- 
ed. His Gethsemase where he cried, 
0 my Father, if possible let this cu'p 
pass from me. Nevertheless not as 1 
will, but as thou wilt. Then the sword 
awoke against the fellow of God, and 
Justice was satisfied, and the law was 
magnified. 

Then the temple made with hands 
was taken down. Jesus fulfilled the 
law. He said, Destroy this temple, 
and in three' days 1 will raise it up. 

The most wonderful work was ac- 
complished in the crucihxion and res- 
urrection of the Son of man. He 
made an end of sin, and abolished 
death, and brought life and immor- 
tality to light through the 1 gospel. This 
is the coming of the kingdom of 
heaven. 

The caution Jesus drops first is, 
Take heed, lest any man deceive you. 
For many shall come in his name say- 
ing I am Christ. When any notable 
event, or great change is coming,, 
there are many advisers thinking they 
are able to advise what should be 
done, and ready to be leaders. This 
has always been so. Now while the 
nations of Europe are in a furious 
war. how many are urging our goy- 

fare, such as the nations of Europe 
drilled in warfare are now clasped in 
this death si niggle. 

if cv.-r there was a time when the 
United States should keep her tem- 
per, and throw aside the wild jingo 
cry of to arms, to arms, it is now. 

May our nation be enabled to show 
her moderation setting an example of 
righteous living, being clad with the 

dent be kept on his fe'et, and not be 
drifting into the wild clamor of 
building forts, when already it is 
demonstrated that no earthly fort 



can withstand the shock of cannon. 

If the United States will behave 
herself with becoming moderation, 
and not meddle in this war, but in 
'patience wait; and that when the time 
shall come, advise peace to thesa 
w ai ring nations, not encouraging them 
by making heavy outlays herself, like 
these warring nations have been do- 
ing, then she may be of service to 
them, in a few months at the pres- 
ent rate of warfare and destructiou 
of both life and property they will 
destroy themselves, so that they will 
have war enough. 

in times of great calamity it is 
common for so many to rise up claim- 
ing they can tell what should be done. 
Many shall rise and say, I am Christ, 
and shall deceive many. Go not after 
them. Cod rules. In patience possess 
your souls. One thing let us remem- 
ber. They that take the sword shall 
perish with the sword. 

It is natural for men to go to war. 
V. e should take 1 heed to ourselves 

3rd. Jesus gave them a sign of the 
destruction of Jerusalem that had 
become so corrupt that it had become 
as a carcass unfit to remain on the 
earth to defile it. 

But when ye shall see the abomina- 
tion of desolation, spoken of by Dan- 
iel the prophet, standing where it 
ought not, then let them that ire in 
Judea flee to the mountains. 

There are brethren that would spir- 
itualize the scripture, or claim to do 
so. to the extent of ignoring or disre- 
garding the literal meaning of scrip- 
ure. A true, faithful and safe inter 
pretation of scripture must retain the 
literal meaning of the word, for man 
am 1 live by every word of God. All 
<rv'\ are is profitable. The apples of 
gO'la most be held in pictures of sil- 
ver: the honey and the honey comb 
both are preserved. There is in the 
instiuction of Jesus a telling the dis- 
ciples how they may know when Je- 



fllON'S LANDMARK. 



89 



rusaleni is to be destroyed, and the 
temple to be thrown down, and there- 
fore when they are to flee out of the 
City to the mountains. The Roman 
army, the abomination of desolation, 
should attaek Jerusalem, and destroy 
it. .sow when you see this flee for 
your lives. Do not take any thing out 
of your houses. Woe be to them that 
are with child or that give suek in 
those days. Pray that your night be 
not in the winter, nor on the sabbath 
day. Jesus tells them all these things 
shall come to pass in this generation. 
For the elect's sake these days of ter- 
rible suffering shall be shortened or 
no flesh should be saved, or delivered 
in this great distress. How merciful 
Jesus is to tell his disciples how to 
act. Every believer took heed to his 
warning, and when they saw the 
things being fulfilled that he foretold, 
did liee and escaped to the moun- 
tains. 

Now this is the destruction of the 
Jewish nation, the end of the wor- 
ship literally in the temple, the scat- 
tering of the Jewish nation. 

4th. But in those days after this 
tribulation shall the sun be darkened, 
the moon shall not give her light, and 
the stars of heaven fall, and the pow- 
ers that are in heaven shall be 
shaken. 

The sun represents the light of the 
Jewish heaven, or the first heaven 
that should be blown out, or pass 
away. The moon represents the shad- 
owy dispensation under the law that 
shall not give her light. The stars 
represent the leaders and rulers un- 
der the la.w dispensation that shall 
fall down, or rule no more. For when 
Jesus the Sun of righteousness shall 
arise with healing in his wings these 
luminaries that rule in the night shall 
disa] pear -it the rising of the glor- 
ious ,uu of right* msness. Then shall 
they 1 ;i of man coming in the 
clouds with great power nnd glory. 



Then shall he send his angels (his 
apostles) and they shall preach his 
gospel to every creature, and gather 
his elect from the four winds, from 
the uttermost part of earth to the 
uttermost part of heaven. Great pow- 
er was given to the apostles as it was 
manifest on the day of Pentecost, 
and after. The old dispensation pass- 
ed away, not one stone was left upon 
another. The Son of man appeared 
in miracles of healing and blessing 
the people of God in giving them un- 
derstanding, in granting them repent- 
ance toward God and in faith in the 
Lord Jesus. The believers rejoiced 
with great joy and had all things 
common. No man, nor 'power could 
withstand the glorious gospel power. 
A new spiritual kingdom was mani- 
fest on earth that was not of this 
world. The Holy Ghost was the 
Great Teacher and one speech, lan- 
guage, tongue, one joy and peace was 
given to the brethren in Jesus, and 
great grace rested upon them all. 

6th. But now what follows? Shall 
there be no more warfare, or conflict 
in the church, no more tribulation? 
For the Son of man is as a man taking 
a far journey, who left his house (his 
church) and gave authority to his ser- 
vants, and to every man his work, and 
commanded the porter to watch. Af- 
ter the ascension of Jesus into glory 
the apostles and other servants are to 
occupy till he comes again. For Jesus 
said it is expedient for you that I go 
away. I go to prepare a place for 
you, and if I go I will come again and 
receive you unto miyself, that where I 
am there ye may be also. 

God hath set in the church first 
apostles, secondarily prophets, then 
pastors &c., for the perfecting of the 
saints, for the building up the body. 
Now Jesus has taken a far journey. 
The Good Man has taken a long jour- 
ney. He will come again, but when 
we know not. The servants that are 



90 



zion's landmark. 



Avise will watch and take heed, but 
such as are not watchful will say my 
Lord delay eth his coming, and will 
beat the men servants and the maid 
servants, and will eat with the 
drunken. 

5th. Watch is the watchword left 
with these servants. It is true this 
same Jesus will come again as ye have 
seen him go into heaven, for the 
heaven must receive Jesus until the 
restitution of all the Lord God hath 
spoken since the 1 world began, Acts 
3 :21. So that when all that has been 
promised from the beginning is ac- 
complished and fulfilled Jesus will 
leave his mediatorial throne and shall 
come to earth again to judge the quick 
and the dead. For God hath appoint- 
ed a day in the which he will judge 
the world in righteousness by that man 
whom he hath ordaind, Acts 17:31. 

The church is the temple of God, the 
home for his people, the mansion for 
the believer. Let every one dwell in 
peace, each one abiding in his lot. Those 
that serve in the ministry shall each 
one wait on his ministry. They shall 
fee'd the flock of God which he hath 
purchased with his own blood. Let 
each one take heed to himself, and to 
the doctrine, contending earnestly for 
the faith once delivered to the saints. 

No one knows when the Son of man 
shall come. Therefore let each one 
watch. The scriptures warn us that 
some shall depart from the faith, giv- 
ing heed to doctrines of devils. The 
love of money or gain shall decoy 
many. Love of worldly pleasure shall 
lure many. The servant must be pa- 
tient, not strive for the mastery. He 
must love his Lord, walk by faith 
keep his body under, be an example 
te the flock. He that endureth unto 
the end the same shall be saved. 

Blessed is that servant who is found 
watching when his Lord com eth. Hap- 
py are those servants that give good 
heed to all tit* Lord ha-th commanded, 



and who love his appearing, and hold 
last Ilic worcL^pf our Lord Jesus. 



Obituaries. 



CHARLIE CLIFTON SMITH. 

Charlie Clifton Smith, baby of Pol- 
lie and Grover Smith was born May 
10th, 1913, and died June 24th, 1914, 
making his stay on earth 13 months 
and 15 days. lie was a bright and 
loving child and was loved by all who 
knew him. 

We did all we could for him, but 
the^Lord took him home. It is hard 
to part from our dear one's, but the 
Lord giveth and the Lord taketh 
away, blessed be the name of the 
Lord. 

Little Charlie will be greatly miss- 
ed. There is a vacant 'place in their 
home which never can be filled. 

"They loved him, yes they loved him, 
But the angels loved hitn more 
And they have called him gently, 
To yonder shining shore." 



W. A. HOWARD. 

Dear Editor: — Please allow me 
space to announce the death of Mr. 
W. A. Howard. He was taken sick 
and went to bed June 24 with typhoid 
fever and died July 19. 1914, his age 
being unknown. 

"A precious one from us has gone, 
A voice we loved is stilled 
A place is vacant in our home 
Which never can be filled." 

Written by a friend. 

MRS. W. T. JENKINS, 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



RUFUS F. HARRIS. 

Rui'us F. Harris was born Dec. 21st, 
1858 and died Aug. 16th, 1914, being 
fifty-five year sold. He was well aud 
worked all day Saturday. Sunday 
Morning at three o'clock 1 woke up 
and found him breathing hard. 1 call- 
ed him but he was beyond speech. 
Only oue short struggle and he was 
gone 1 . 

It was so hard to give him up. 1 can 
only ask God to give me the peace and 
understanding which I hope for. 

He was not member of any church, 
but he believed in the Primitive Bap- 
tists. 

He left me with two grown boys 
and two girls. Fray for me that 1 
may become reconciled in this hour of 
deep distress. 

HIS WIFE. 
MRS. ELIZA BRYAN. 

Departed this life July 28th, 1914, 
at her home in Onslow County, N. C, 
-Mrs. Eliza Bryan, wife of Elder Gard- 
ner Bryan, who preceded her to the 
grave 1 year and 7 months. 

She was married to Elder Gardner 
Bryan in 1870. There were 10 children 
born to their union, all of whom sur- 
vive them. 

She united with the church at Mud- 
dy Creek, Duplin County. N. C, 22 or 
23 years ago. She always filled her 
place in church unless 'providentially 
hindered. She was an obedient wife, 
a kind and living mother, an obliging 
neighbor. 

She bore her affliction which was 
cancer of the stomach with Christian 
fortitude. She was a noble woman. She 
was kind to all. She did on several 
occasions give food to poor old ne- 
groes. 

From the time hor husband died 
there were no charms in this world for 
her. She would weep when she would 
pass his grave and say poor papa, how 



long before I can come to you. She 
desired death above all things. She did 
not visit even her children much af- 
ter his death. 

All was done by her children in 
medical aid and watchful care; all 
they could do, but none can stay the 
hand of death. The Lord giveth and 
the Lord taketh away, Hlessed be the 
name of the Lord. 

Dear children on earth, 
No longer I can stay, 
1 hope the dear Lord 
In mercy will show you all the straight 
and narrow way. 

Written by her son-in-law, 

JOHN M. HORNE. 
Calharine Lake, N. C. 



AGED AND RESPECTED RESI- 
DENT OF BLACK CREEK, PASS- 
ES AWAY. 

Our mother, Mrs. Anna Privett, died 
at hor home in this place Oct. 25th, 
1914. 

Deceased was born at Rangers Cross 
Roads. X. C, and lived there until 
her marriage. After her marriage, 
sin; lived for five years at Wilson, N. 
( '., but for the last twenty-five years 
has resided at this place. She was a 
member of the Primitive Baptist 
elm tcli at lower Black Creek. And 
her beautiful Christian charity won 
her many warm friends. Her life was 
a shining example, for others and a 
guidiig star for the dear ones left to 
mourn her loss. Sue is survived By 
four daughters and one son, namely, 
Mrs. H. S. Robinson, 1027 1-2 Fast 
7 tli St.. Charlotte. X. C, Mrs. K. D. 
Owens, Misses Gertrude and Ruth Priv- 
ett and Mr. Otto Privett, all of Black 
Creek. 

Our Mother. 

She folded her hands; when life's 



92 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



evening eame 
At the close 1 of a sad Autumn day, 
And, (Jod's white winged angels then 

silently came 
And carried our loved one away. 

No more will the light in her soft ten 
dex eyes 

Proclaim \o her children her love. 
And the sweet voice that chanted her 

favorite hymns 
Will carrol with angels above. 

But wc sLill have 1 her bible she cher- 
ished so long 

\\ hose pages she conned in her youth, 

And the messages gleaned in her well 
beloved search 

Always flooded her life with the truth. 

It guided her life through the spring- 
time of you^h 

Like a true friend, 'twas ever at hand. 

Always guiding he'r on through the 
autumn of life 

Till she crossed o'er the bright border 
land. 

To us, whom she left here, to mourn 
our sad loss 

May this book be a bright guiding- 
star, 

And her life guide 1 our steps in the 

pathway of right 
Like a beason light, gleaming afar. 

Written by her daughter, 

LENA GERTRUDE PRIVETT. 
Grgensboro, N. C. 



SOLOMON GORNTO. 

By request of the family I attempt 
to write 1 a sketch of the life of Bro. 
Solomon Gornto. I have no eulogy 
to do this good man justice and it is 
witli much weakness that I make the 
attempt. 

Brother Gornto yras bora in Oa»lew 



County, N. C, February 23rd, 1830, 
and peacefully breathed out his life 
July 1st, 1912, at the ripe old age of 
82 years, four month and live days, 
leaving to mourn their loss one aged 
sister, one niece and one nephew, be- 
sides a host of friends. But we mourn 
not without hope, for we are sure our 
loss is Ins eternal gain. Truly a good 
niiin we loved is gone. 

commissioner, as justice of the peace 
and other minor positions with distin- 
guished honor. He served in the late 
war between the states as first lieu- 
tenant of Co. G, 3rd North Carolina 
regiment, but on account of his fail- 
ing health was honorably discharged 
and returned home. 

He was married to Carrie Ward and 
unto this union were born four chil- 
dren. They and their mother preced- 
ed luin many years to the tomb. 

His sister having lost her husband 
and left her with two children moved 
in with him and this good family lived 
together until the above name'd sepa- 
ration came. 

Language fails to describe its social 
hospitality and the writer feels to say 
that those who visited this home sel- 
dom could find such a warm welcome 
elsewhere, and righ here will state 
that since the passing away of this 
good man this home' has been burned 
to ashes by fire, making it possibly 
sadder for the bereaved ones. 

This good man some twenty years 
ago was united with the Primitive Bap- 
tist church ;it Wards Will and served 
the church as clerk until his health be- 
came too feeble to attend. 

Brother Gornto always had a good 
word for all. A heart and hand to 
the poor and needy. Well may it be 
said that his religion was pure and 
undefi 1. He 1 lived, worked, talked 
and died in the faith that he claime'd, 
contending for the complete salvation 
©f fallen men in the' life, death and 



ZION'S LANDMARK. ' 



93 



resurrection of Jesus as the only way 
under heaven whereby man can be 
saved. 

The writer was blessed to visit him 
many times in his latter days while he 
was mostly housed on account of his 
health aud loves to reme'mber our ar- 
dent affections and conversations as 
brothers in the Lord. 

We have to bow in submission to the 
allwise God in our affliction and say 
"thy will be done." 

Thou thalt sleep but not forever. 
There will be a glorious dawn. 
We shall meet to >part no never, 
On the 1 resurrection morn. 

May the Lord bless and preserve 
the bereaved family, enable them to 
lay up to themselves treasures in 
heaven where neither moth nor rust 
doth corrupt, nor thieves break 
through and steal, as we believe their 
dear brother and uncle did. 

Written by one who loved him. 



L. CHESTER WARD. 

It is with a sad heart that 1 at- 
tempt to write the death of my dear 
son, L. Chester Ward, who departed 
this life Feb. 28th, 1914, making his 
stay on earth 33 years, 8 months and 
3 days. 

He married Cottie Iva Smith on 
Nov. 27, 1906. He leaves a wife, four 
girls, a father, mother, one brother 
and five sisters to mourn their loss. 
But we feel sure that it is his great 
gain. 

He was not a member of any church 
but a strong believer in the Old Prim 
itive Baptists. He delighted in hear- 
ing them preach. 

He was a highly respected neigh- 
bor, a kind and tender hearted hus- 
band and father, doing all he could 
for his family, also a loving and obed- 
ient sen. 



He was in bad health for three 
years or more, but didn't take his bed 
until two weeks before his death. All 
was done that could be rendered on 
this earth, but none could stay the 
mighty hand of death. The good 
Lord knows best, and his will be done. 
We saw that he was growing worse 
so we agreed that he be taken to the 
hospital in Charleston, S. C, but all in 
vain. He lived only one week there, 
and was sent back home where he was 
buried not far from Nichols. 

No one but our dear Saviour knew 
the cause of his death. May the Lord 
bless Ins wife and dear little children. 

We loved him, yes we loved him, 
But Angels loved him more, 
And they have gently called him, 
To yonder shining shore. 
The golden gates were opened, 
A gentle voice said come; 
And with farewells unspoken, 
He calmly entered home. 

His loving father and mother, 
MR. AND MRS. J. W. WARD. 
Nichols. S. C. 



ELDER W. R. CRAFT. 

Stump Sound — Tuesday after 2nd 
Sunday in Jan. 

Bay — Wednesday. 

Y o'p ps — T h u r sd ay . 

Wardswill — Friday. 

North East —Sat. and 3rd Sunday. 

Hadnotts Creek— Monday. 

Newport — Tuesday. 

Morehead City — Tuesday night. 

Hunting Quarter — Wednesday at 
night. 

Majishallburg— Thursday night. 
North River — Friday. 
Newport — Saturday. 
White Oak— 4th Sunday. 
South West — Monday. 
Maple Hill— Tuesday. 
Cypress Greek — Wednesday. 



94 



♦ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Willow Bottom — Thursday. 
Sand Hill — Friday. 
Muddy Creek — Sat. and 5th 
day. 



UNION. 

The next session of tlw Suiithfield 
Union will be held with the church a'; 
Little Creek, Johnston Co. N. C, Sat. 
and 5th Sunday in Jan. 19 J 5. 

Elder J. A. T. Jones is appointed to 
preach the introductory sermon, and 
Elder W. A. Simpkins his alternate. 
Brethren, sisters and ministers are 
cordially invited. 

Those coming by rail can be met at 
Wilson's Mills, by notifying J. A. Bat- 
ten, Wilson's Mills, N. C, oi D. T. 
Stephenson at Smithfield, N C. 

J. A. -4ATTF.N. 

Union Clerk. 



ders. During the first 30 days after 
the season opened they shipped out 
more than 8,000 orders, many of them 
calling for 1,000 trees to the order, 
and that their salesmen continue to 
send in orders from points that were 
previously canvassed. This shows 
that our people are alive to the im- 
portance of planting fruit, shade and 
ornamental trees. 

LADIES|JJ08 REWARD l^SSS 

*KSO; D.»i'!.!'' s" .' .'.'j'.'h ' ' "u!\:nt I.l.'f T H:rK.WriU-t,,,ii,'v.' 

Dr. J. R. Southinglon Remedy Co.. 515 Main St. Kansas City, Mo. 



UNION. 

The Black Creek Union is appoint- 
ed to be held with the' church at Low- 
er Black Creek, Sat, and 5th Sunday 
in Jan. 1915. 

Elder R. H. Beswell is appointed to 
preach the introductory sermon and 
Elder P. D. Gold his alternate'. 

Those coming by rail will stop at 
Black Creek Depot Saturday morning 
or Friday. 

R. H. BOSWELL, 

Union Clerk. 



The Mill Branch Union is to convene 
with the church at Mill Branch Satur- 
day and 5th Sunday in Jan. 1915. 



DROPSY ™gg D , 



The Greensboro Nurserie's, John A. 
Young & Sons owners, report that this 
Fall season opened with a rush of or- 



IN PLACE OF DRAWING WATER. 
By Frederick W. Keene. 
Allegorical Narratives for the in- 
struction and comfort of Babes in 
Grace. 

Neatly bound in cloth, 50 cents per 
copy, or five copies for $2.00 postpaid. 

Can be had from the office of Zion's 
Landmark or from Elder Frederick 
W. Keene, North Berwick, Main«. 



ENTiiiiTAINING BOOK 

If you wish to read a highly enter- 
taining book of about 80 pages — price 
50 cents — descriptive of character* 
both true and false, as set forth in the 
Bible, send for this book. 

Address 

ELD EI? F. W. KEENE. 
North Berwick, Maine 
Or order- the book from rae. 

P. D. GO!. I). 



WANTED, Ford Owners To demon- 
strate "New Invisible Simplex Self 
Starter." Ford cars only. No bat- 
teries, springs, cables or other junk. 
Equal to any electric starter at one- 
fifth the price. Fully guaranteed. 
Shipped out on a week's trial. Sells 
on sight. Write Quick. 
Simplex Manufacturing Co., 1551 Great 
Northern Building, Chicago 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



95 



NOTICE. 

Bro. \V. R. Dodd, Whitmell, Va., 
has kindly ottered to send in subscrip- 
tions for The Landmark, and those 
desiring to subscribe or renew their 
subscription can give him the money. 
A receipt card will be mailed to each 
direct for amount paid. 

P. D. G. 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Nerves. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

CONNERSVILLE, IND., 

R. No. 1, Box G., 

Agents Wanted. 



REQUEST. 
We are in need of money to pay ex- 
penses. While war is raging in the 
East we need money as much as if 
there were no Avar. We can help each 
other by paying debts. Please send 
on what is due on the Landmark, and 
let each one pay his debts, as far as 
possible, and this will help to relieve 
the distress. 

P. D. G. 



An Only Daughter 

Relieved of Consumption 

When death was hourly expected, all remedies 
having failed, and Dr. II. James was experiment- 
ing with the many herbs of Calcutta, he acci- 
dentally made a preparation which cured his 

0 ily child of Consumption. He has proved 
to the world that Consumption can be positive- 
ly and permanently cured. The doctor now 
nives his recipe tree only asking two 2-cent 
stamps to pay expenses. This herb also 
cure? Night Sweats. Nausea at the stomach and 
will break up a fn-h coH in r.v. ntv tour hours. 
Address Craddock & Co., Philadelphia. 

naming this paper. 

1 have made an arrangement for a 
very niee Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. G 



THREE BOOKS OF INTEREST. 

Have You Read Them? 
Biographical History of Baptist 
Ministers 

containing nearly 1000 sketches, 381 
pictures of Ministers, Deacons and tal- 
ented Sisters, together with an Appen- 
dix of much useful information — 
Price $2.00. 

Also Theodosin Ernest, The Heroine of 
Faith, and Ten Days in Search 
of the Church 

both these books in one volume and 
contain G-rJ7 pages. No work of its size 
and cost is a better defense of Bible 
doctrine and practice, or sets the one 
church Christ built in fairer colors. 

Price $1.25. 
These books are well printed on good 
paper, substantially and neatly bound, 
and above all they are highly endorsed 
by Elders Hassell, Cash,. Thompson, 
Gold, Waters, Dalton, Chick, Hurst, 
Webb, Lester, Cayce, Branscome, Nor- 
ton. Stewart, Henderson, Hanks, Dur- 
pnd, Daily, Moore, Oliphant, Lundy, 
Morris, Hardy, Raulston, Pope, Mew- 
born, Gilbert, Farmer, Denny, Elkins, 
and hundreds of other ministers and 
editors the country over. 
As long as they last both volumes will 
be sent Together for $2.75 and if you 
are not pleased with your purchase 
thev may be returned in good order 
and money will be refunded. 

Send ail orders to 
R. H. PITTMAN, Luray, Va. 



FOR INFORMATION. 

For information and for reference 
we would be pleased to have a Minute 
of every Primitive Baptist Association 
in America and will thank the Clerks 
of the various Associations to forward 
one to me at their earliest possible 
convenience. 



M 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



MOORE'S MINERAL SPRINGS* 

Last summer my health became 
very poor. I went to Moore's Miner- 
al Springs, in Stokes County, N. C, 
remaining the're about 12 days, 1 re- 
turned home well. 

This water acts on the blood, the 
skin, the bowe'ls, kidneys, stomach, 
catarrh, &c. 

I gladly recommend this water to 
the sick. Hotel open winter and sum- 
mer. Wate'r shipped from Rural Hall, 
N. C, at $1.50 per case of 12 half gal- 
lons and cases to be returned in 30 
days. 

P. D. GOLD. 



Cabbage Plants 



WEBSTER'S 
NEW 
INTERNATIONAL 
DICTIONARY 

THE MERRIAM WEBSTER 

The Only New unabridged dic- 
tionary in many years. 

Contains the pith and essence 
of an authoritative library. 
Covers every field ol knowl- 
edge. An Encyclopedia in a 
single book. 

The Only Dictionary with the 
New Divided Page. 

400,000 Words. 27CO Pages. 
6000 Illustrations. Cost nearly 
half a million dollars. 

Let us tell you about this most 
remarkable single volume. 

"Write for sample 
pages, full par- 
ticulars, etc. 
Name thi:; 




&C.Memam Co. 



FOURTEENTH EDITION OF SHAPE 
NOTES. 

We are getting out the Fourteenth 
Edition of Shape Notes of our Hymn 
and Tune Books which will soon be 
ready for distribution. The price is 
70 cents each, sent by mail, and six 
dollars per dozen sent by express at 
cost of purchaser. 

There will be sent with each book, 
upon request, without additional cost, 
a neat pamphlet of 30 pages, contain- 
ing rudiments of music, and graded 
lessons for use in singing classes, in 
connection with the Hymn and Tune 
Book. Send orders to Elder Silas H. 
Durand- Southampton, Pa., or Elder P. 
G. Lester, Floyd, Va., or to Elder P. D. 
Gold, Wilson, N. C. 



JHdm^ III 



TURN HAIR BARK 
WITH SAGE TEA 



Jf Mixed With Sulphur It Darkens so 
Naturally Nobody Can Tell. 

The old-time mixture of Sag© Tea 
and Sulphur for darkening graj r , 
streaked and faded hair is grand- 
mother's treatment, and folks are 
again using it to keep their hair a 
good,, even color, which is quite sen- 
Bible, as we are living in an age when, 
& youthful appearance is of the great- 
est advanage. 

Nowadays, though, we don't have 
tthe troublesome task of gathering the 
sag« and the mussy mixing at home. 
All drug stores sell the ready-to-use 
product called "Wyeth'i Sage and 
Sulphur Compound" for about 50 
cents a bottle. It is very popular be- 
cause nobody can discover it has been 
applied. Simply moisten your comb 
or a soft brush with it and draw this 
through your hair, taking one small 
strand at a time ; by morning the gray 
hair disappears, but what delights 
the ladies with Wyeth's Sage and Sul- 
phur is that, besides beautifully dark- 
ening the hair after a few applica- 
tions, it also produces that soft lustre 
and appearance of abundance which 
is so attractive; beeides, prevents 



dandruff, itching scalp and falling 
hair. 



UNION NOTICE. 

Dear Brother Gold: — Please say yi 
the Landmark that the 171st session 
of the Contentnea Union is appointed 
to be held with the church at the 
Meadow, Greene County, N. C, on 
Saturday and 5th Sunday in January 
1916. Elder T. B. Lancaster was ap- 
pointed to preach the introductory 
sermon and Elder Jno. W. Gardner, 
his alternate. 

Messengers and visitors will be met 
Saturday morning at Walstonburg. 

L. J. H. MEWBORN, 

Union Clerk. 



Jtorfolk 
Southern iffiy. 

Route of the 

"Night Express/' 

Charlotte to Norfold 
and 

Intermediate Points. 
Pullman Cars 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST 



EXPERIENCE. 

Some of the sisters have asked me 
to write my experience and I will try ' 
to do so. 

' When I was about ten years old .1 
joined the Missionary Baptist church 
during a protracted meeting. 

1 don't know just why i joined, but 
I thought 1 wanted to be a Mission- 
ary. There were lots of children join- 
ing the church and I was led into it. 
But I never felt any change. 

When 1 was about thirteen years 
old I had a dream. 

I dreamed one night that I was 
walking in a valley. There were 
beautiful trees and green grass grow- 
ing by a lovely stream. As J walked 
along 1 heard the fluttering of wings 
and looking up 1 saw an angel flying 
and it lit in a tree just before me. 
His raiment was white and there was 
a circle about his head as a light 
shining from within and as I stood 
looking at him another angel flew 
down and walked by me on the grass. 
This second angel said to me : "Do 
you know who that is?" and I said 
"No." Then he said: "That is 
Jesus." 

He had a book under his arm and 
he said, "Let's sing praises unto the 
Lord." and opened the book. I said. 
"I can't sing, I don't know the 
song." But when he opened the 
book and I saw the song I began 



singing praises unto the Lord al- 
though i' had never seen the song be- 
fore. 

1 really sang, because I was awak- 
ened by my own voice singing. 

That dream made a lasting impress- 
ion on my mind. 1 did not know any 
Primitive Baptists then. 

After 1 came to Wilson to live with 
Mrs. P. D. Gold, I saw there was a 
difference between the Primitives and 
the other churches. At first I laugh- 
ed at, what I called, the narrowness 
of the brethren and sisters. After I 
had been to the church several times, 
I attended a Missionary Baptist 
church. Each one was called upon to 
give their experience. One got up 
and told what she had done for the 
Lord. How much money she had given, 
etc. Then another and another. They 
called on me, and I told them I had 
not done anything. I could have told 
them some of the things the Lord had 
done for me, but I knew from what 
the others had said that my exper- 
iences would not sui* them. 

Up until about t.iat time I had 
thought I was good. On the 3rd Sun- 
day in Aug. 1914, (if I am not mis- 
taken) I asked my husband for some 
money, I was going to the Missionary 
Baptist church and I wanted to pay 
up my dues. When T got in about a 
block of the church, something im- 
pressed me to go to the Primitive 
Baptist church. I tried to go on to 



98 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



my church, but I could not. I felt like 
I would die if I did, so 1 weut to the 
Primitive Baptist church. Elder J. F, 
Farmer preached that day. Oh how 
sweet his words were to me. The tears 
rolled down my cheeks. 1 felt like 
Brother Farmer kuew how 1 feit. He 
told my feelings better- than I could 
myself. As soon as he stopped preach- 
ing. I hurried out of church. I was 
afraid he kuew I was in trouble and 
would ask me about it. 1 was asham- 
ed to be so affected by the old Baptist 
doctriue. I didn't tell my husband 
about it until several months after- 0 
wards* , . j 

After this I began to read the Bible 
more diligently, but it seemed every 
thing I read condemned me. 1 felt 
like 1 was a lost, ruined sinner. 1 
couldn't sleep at night. 1 began go- 
ing to the prayer meetings the breth- 
ren were having at each other's 
houses. I didn't want them to know 
1 was under conviction, but I could 
not keep away from their meetings. 

In Oct. of 1914 at the church one of 
the traveling preachers preached to 
me it seemed. My burden was taken 
from me when he read the 3rd chap- 
ter of Samuel, when the Lord called 
Samuel, and Samuel said "Speak 
Lord, for thy servant heareth." 

I knew in my heart that the Lord 
had prepared me, that he had made 
me ready to be his servant. Then the 
preacher quoted, "Though your sins 
be as scarlet I will make them white 
as snow. ; ' ' For a few days I felt 
very happy but then the thought kept 
coming "are you going to join the 
Primitives?'' I felt like I couldn't 
do that. I felt like I'd be disgraced. 
In my mind I said they are an ignor- 
ant people and poor and unclean, but 
the good Lord humbled me. He show- 
ed me that I was the ignorant one. He 
says in the Holy Scriptures, "For 



whosoever exalteth himself shall be 
abased; and he that humbleth himsel* 
shall be exalted." 1 was abased. 

One night 1 could not sleep for 
thinking of my condition. 1 hadn't 
told Elder Gold about my trouble. 1 
was so abased 1 felt like lie tonkin t 
fellowship me. 1 knew lie knew ail 
my faults, knew how hard it is for me 

I went into his room and told him 
and his wife about my ttrouble and 
asked them if they could fellowship 
jne. They said lots of things to com- 
fort me and said they were very glad 
lo hear me tell the good things the 
Lord had done for me. 

On the 3rd Sunday in Feb. 1915, I 
told my experience at a little prayer 
meeting at Sister Amerson's. Elder 
Farmer opened the door of the ehurch 
and they received me. Elder Gold 
baptized me on the 4th Sunday in 
February. 

The Lord has been very gracious to 
me, though vile sinner that I am. 

Bro. Durand writes in the Signs of 
the Times, that it is unspeakably ter- 
rible to one who has feit the love of 
God in his soul to fear that it is gone 
from him. That is exactly how I feel 
some times. I feel some times that I 
was perhaps mistaken. Oh, I hope T 
am not mistaken. I feel that 1 am 
the chief of sinners. I know there is 
nothing I can do to save myself. It is 
the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ 
who saves me from my sins. 

I hope that I have passed from 
death into life, Because I Do Love the 
Brethren. 

SEDALIA GOLD. 

Wilson, N. C. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Gold :— I feel like this 
morning T cannot refrain from doing 
my duty, if I know what my duty is. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



99 



After lying on my bed sleepless for 
many nights, meditating on these 
things, wondering why 1 am travel- 
ing in the darkness, looking forward 
to the coming of light and no light to 
me returns. Traveling in this dark 
wilderness I can see no way out, no 
way to esacpe. The horrors of dark- 
less seize upon me. I find no rest for 
the sole of my foot and my soul faints 
within me. The revelation being this: 
' ' Deep calleth unto deep, and night un- 
to night." The meaning of. these 
words is not made plain to my mind 
and I can only cry unto the Lord, say- 
ing: '"Lord how long will these things 
continue with me?" Oh Lord what is 
coming to me- I cannot even ask 
the Lord for his mercies. Oh the 
agony of soul, mind and body. "When 
I arise I feel exhausted. Oh how im- 
perfect and how unworthy. After 
suffering all these things time and 
time again, we should not refrain 
from complying with our duty if we 
know what it is. Then we find that 
"Deep calleth unto deep, and night 
unto night," for not complying with 
tbo duty the Lord has enjoined on us. 
Oli how T do shudder and my feelin 
sink down within when I undertake 
the task. In disobedience we find 
trouble, but in obedience we find re- 
lief. It looks like we would learn the 
lesson so often taught, for His prom- 
ises stand sure, and in well doing we 
find peace for our weary souls. 

We read that our faith has to be 
tried as by fire, therefore we must ex- 
pect the firey darts of Satan and th 
temptations of Satan, to compass both 
soul and body. When we see the 
dark billows over us roll, then we are 
made to cry unto the Lord: "Oh Lord 
how long?'' 

When will the day of corruption 
end and we can see the light return. 
When we can see the son of righteou 



ness rise with healing in his wings. 
Oh how beautiful the sight to the p* 
weary traveler. Then the night is 
dispersed and tha glorious light ap- 
pears. 

How happy the passing moments. 
Last night in my wakeful hours while' 
1 meditated I was made to say "Lord, 
I pray thee be merciful unto me." 
The words of the poet sprung up in 
my mind: 

"Reach down, Reach down thine arm, 
And cause me to ascend 
Where congregations never break up, 
And Sabbaths never end." 

What a gracious feeling coursed 
through my soul, and these sweet 
words also gladdened my heart: 

"Oh when shall I see Jesus and reign 

with his above? 
And from the flowing fountain drink 

everlasting love. 
When shall I' be delivered from this 

vain world of sin 
And with my blessed Jesus drink end- 
less pleasures in." 
This is my desire, to be exempt 
from this vain world of sin, and ask- 
ing the Lord for refreshing sleep. 

All our troubles are brought on us 
to show us the things we have not 
known. 

Brother Gold, I don't know whether 
there is any good in what I have writ- 
ten or not, but I would like for my 
friends and relatives and the house- 
hold of faith to know that I am living 
and have the greatest desire to meet 
with the saints of God. 

We read that every thing works to- 
gether for good to those who love the 
Lord, and also that we are called ac- 
cording to Grace and purpose. The 
Landmark is my preaching and con- 
solation. 



100 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



Pray for me Brother Gold. 
Yours iu hope of eternal life, 

RUTH A TRIPP. 

Greenville, N. G. 

SUFFERED LOSS BY FIRE. 

Elder P. D. Gold, most highly 
esteemed Brother: — 1 feel that 1 am 
unworthy to have a name among a 
people so devoted and true as the 
Primitive Baptists are for the cause 
of Christ, and yet I cannot leave or 
forsake so lovely a people. 

0, is there any one so blank, vile 
and depraved as I feel to be? 

I went to the Primitive Baptist As- 
sociation at Wilmington, N. C, and 
had a most enjoyable time, hearing 
so many of the Lord's servants preach 
and expound the holy word of God, 
both at the Association and at the 
home of our beloved brother Jimmie 
Brown. I feel like saying, God bless 
Brother Brown, and all who did so 
much for the Association. I came 
back to South-West church, with Bro. 
Sam Jenkins, and found all up and as 
well as usual. He wanted me to 
with him and rest up, for I was not 
well, and I did so, but my mind was 
not at ease, and on Thursday I heard 
that nry family were out of doors, fire 
having destroyed the house, kitchen 
and nearly all they contained. I fu 1 
realized that I was unable to rebni' ' 
I prayed that God, in mercy, would 
aid us and enable us to patiently bear 
all that is put upon us. 

The dear Lord has put it into the 
minds of our kind neighbors to aid us. 
I trust they will be rewarded for thei" 
kindness. 

Brother Gold, may God bless you in 
your decline of natural life. I will 
close. May our last days on earth be 
our best days, in the sweet hope of 
eternal rest. 



Your unworthy brother in Christ, 
JOHN A. HEWITT. 



EXPERIENCE. 

The following was sent to Elder 
Williford, which he has sent us for 
publication : 

Dear. Bro. Williford :— If the Lord 
is willing I will try to write you my 
little experience which I hope has 
been the dealing of the Lord with me. 

Since I was a child I have always 
loved to be with the Baptists and hear 
them tell of the wonderful love and 
of the blessing he had bestowed upon 
them, and T felt very unworthy to be 
with such good people. I always had 
a desire to go to preaching. 

After a while I got so burdened 
with sin, I do not remember the date, 
and I tried to pray to the Lord to 
have mercy on me a lost sinner. There 
was a protracted meeting at Maple 
Springs Missionary church and I went 
and joined the church. I was re- 
lieved for a time. My trouble soon 
caime back, and I was so dissatisfied I 
went to Peach Tree to hear you preach 
and I was comforted and the more T 
went to hear the Primitives the more 
I loved them. In the year 1911, I 
heard dear Bro. Adams preach many 
times and he told my feelings far bet- 
ter than I could tell them myself. T 
can't tell how much trouble I saw 
that year. I felt like I was deceived 
and had deceived others. I prayed to 
God to show me what to do. I had a 
dream in April. I dreamed I went to 
Peach Tree and Bro. Adams preached 
the best sermon I ever heard. My cup 
was so full T could not keep from cry- 
ing. Then Pro. Adams came to me 
and said he wanted to talk to me. He 
went home with us and he told me T 
was in the dark and asked me if T d.d 
not want to go with the Primitives. I 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



101 



told him yes, but 1 was too unworthy. 
I woke up begging the Lord for 
mercy. 1 went on in this way trying 
to bear my burden until I heard Bro. 
Boswell at Peach Tree, on the second 
Saturday in last November. They 
opened-the door of the church. 1 want- 
ed to go but I felt like I was a vile sin- 
ner and 1 could not go. Bro. Boswell 
came to see me that evening and his 
talk was very sweet to me. When I 
retired that night 1 asked the Lord 
to deliver me and just before time to 
get up the next morning these words 
came to me "choose ye this day whom 
you will serve." I felt like all my 
troubles were gone and I could n< 
praise the Lord enough. My sister 
was to be baptized that day and when 
we met at the water I went forward 
and was received. T knew I had done 
nothing good and that my hope came 
through the mercies of God. For with- 
out his help we are nothing and can 
do nothing. T can't tell any one how 
happy T was 

A short time after I joined the 
church J had such a sweet dream. I 
dreamed we were going down toward 
a beautiful stream full of white rocks 
and fish and in the midst of it there 
was some one dressed in the whitest 
robe I ever saw with a starry crown on 
his head. He bade us come into the 
water and asked us to help him carry 
his fishes to the shore. He embraced 
us in his arms and we all marched out 
of the water with his fish and I awoke 
repeating these words: 

"The dying thief rejoiced to see, 
That fountain in his day; 
And there may I though vile as he 
Wash all my sins away." 

T would love to see this published 
in the Landmark. 

I am not a subscriber because I am 



not able, but 1 love to read it when 1 
have an opportunity. 
Your sister in hope, 

LUCY WHELESS. 



ENCOURAGING. 

Dear Brother Gold: — 1 have often 
felt like 1 would like to write to you 
and tell you how I appreciate your 
editorials in the Landmark. J have 
often been instructed by them and 
thanked Cod for the gift that is in 
you. I think it is wonderful how 
clear your mind has continued to old 
age. God has indeed blessed you and 
I hope will continue them to the end. 
I hope I can hear you preach again: 

Some times when 1 am reading the 
articles from brethen and sisters, 
whom I have never seen and yet who 
tell my feelings better than I can, 1 
am made to rejoice, that we have been 
led in the same path, instructed by 
the same spirit. My hope is strength- 
ened and 1 then feel like I would like 
to write and be one with those "who 
speak often one with another, with 
those who fear the Lord and think 
upon His name." 

I am thankful that I can feel as 
they feel and can enjoy what they 
write, believe what they believe, that 
they are my people, their God my 
God. I am not gifted to write and ex- 
press my feelings for their comfort 
and instruction. I can enjoy their writ- 
ings and love them for the truth's 
sake. 

Hoping that you may be blessed for 
many years for the upbuilding of the 
church. 

Yours in a precious hope, 

SALLTE B. HOLLAND. 

Axton, Va. 



FELLOWSHIP. 
Beloved Brother- — The Landmark 



L02 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



has been especially rich and comfort- 
ing to me of late. The editorials and 
communications have been with grace 
and seasoned with salt. Almost every 
piece has touched a tender cord of my 
heart and caused me to feel strong as- 
surance that we are of the same house- 
hold, and each one built upon the 
foundation of the Apostles and proph- 
ets. Jesus Christ himself being the 
chief corner stone and in whom all 
the building framed together grow- 
eth into an holy temple in the Lord. 
This brings about sweet fellowship in 
our hearts for the household of faith, 
for surely our fellowship is with the 
Father and with His Son, Jesus Christ. 
How can we love Jesus and not love 
his work? If we love and believe his 
teachings, we love and have fellowship 
with the brethren and thus have evi- 
dence that we have passed from death 
into life, because we love the brethren, 
this strengthens our hope and con- 
firms our faith and thus Ave live by 
faith and walk by faith and rejoice in 
the hope of the glory of Go,d. 

I trust the Lord may have many 
years for you in His kingdom below 
to edit and send out the Landmark to 
comfort His people. 

In much love, 

A. B. MORRIS. 

Oxford, Miss. 



ENDORSED. 

Dear Bro. G'Jd: — I am so well 
pleased with your editorial on "Do 
we understand P.-ophecy Before Ita 
Blilllment?*' that I want to write and 
tell you. , 

Why should men attempt to explain 
Prophecy? Or why should men 
prophesy? For to explain unfufillled 
propecy is the work of a prophet. 

Prophecy has never been under- 
stood by those to whom it was spoken. 



Jacob and his family had no thought 
of going into bondage when they 
went down into Egvpt, yet :t was said 
two hundred years before that they 
should serve the people in a strange 
land, and be afflicted by them £or 
four hundred years. ('See Gen. xv.- 
111.) 

When that glorious message con- 
cerning the birth of Christ was pro- 
claimed by Isaiah ix, vi, none under- 
stood it, nor attempted to expound it 
until after its fulfillment. 

Which one of Isaiah's scribes or 
teachers tried to expound (Isa. xl, 1 
to xi,) which is so full of comfort to 
God's people since its fulfilment and 
now easy for them to understand? or 
after the humiliation and death of 
Christ what Jew said : " I told you so, 
I read about this man's sad life and 
death in Isaiah liii? If there was a 
single instance recorded in the Bible 
where a prophecy was understood by 
those to whom it was spoken, either 
as to place or time I can not recall, 
and would be pleased to be informed 
if there is. How then can we ex- 
pound that which has not come to 
pass ? 

There is but one way, and that is, 
we must also be prophets. Even then 
we could have no power to convince 
ohers of our power of divining since 
they could not experience the future. 
But we may be able to reach their 
hearts concerning the past by enter- 
ing into their experience by telling 
them what they know. 

Your brother in hope, 

W. N. THARPE. 

Liberty, Ind. 



OUR ONLY PREACHING. 

Dear Broteher in hope: — I gladly 
devote to you a few lines. I wish to 
thank you for your kindness in send- 



ztON'S LANDMARK- 



103 



ing me the Landmark. The reviewal 
of the Signs of the Times and the 
Landmark contains most of our 
preaching. 

Dear Elder Sawin visited us ami 
held services at my daughter's home, 
ine first week of the month, whieh'was 
the second sermon we have heard since 
the funeral of my dear daughter, 
Blanche. 

Elder Sawin also held services in 
the Oak Grove district, at the home of 
our aged brother, John Nuckals. He 
is a grandson of Elder Andrew Nuc3 
als, long since departed this life. 

lie held services soon after my mar- 
riage and told me if 1 was as good a 
predestinarian as my grandfather 
Davidson was, we would not fall out. 
1 said, "Oh we will not fall out. I 
wanted to tell him 1 already loved 
the Primitive Baptists, but tears 
choked my utterance so that I could 
not. 

Elder William Baird was my hus- 
band's father. They were once resi- 
dents of North Carolina, as was my 
grandfather Davidson. The Davidson 
family came from Scotland. 

I beg an interest in your prayers 
for myself and loved ones. 

Wishing for yourself and your dear 
wife, together with your beloved chil- 
dren many years of true happiness, 
sue]: as this world can neither give 
mor take away. 

My daughter joins me in love to 
each of you, 

LAURA M. BAIRD. 
Caul City, Ky. 



CRACItTOS DEALINO. 

Dear Bro. Gold : — I am writing you 
to tell you how sadly disappointed T 
was in not being able to go to church 
Sunday, and meel you there. T have 
been in feeble health for the pasl 



year but 1 thank the Lord 1 am able 
to see this day. 1 feel thankful to the 
Lord for his blessings, for in him 
dwelleth all the fullness of the God- 
head bodily, which is the head ot . 
principalities and power. Jesus reigns 
and he is the head over all and what 
he has promised he is able to fulfill. 
"Oh for a heart to praise my God.' 
I feel more of my weakness every day 
I live. 1 feel to be the . least of all, 
' ' for 1 know in me, that is in my 
Mesh, dwelleth no good thing: for the 
good that 1 would I do not : but the 
evil which 1 would not, that 1 do." I 
often find myself mourning and la- 
menting my case, then the thought 
comes to my mind, why am 1 thus. 
Why not be content? God is able to 
lead the blind and heal the sick, and 
my light afflictions here will work 
out in the end. God works all things 
according to his own will and pur- 
pose. All things work together for 
good for those who love the Lord. 

" Tis a point J long to know 
Oft it causes anxious thought — 
Do I love the Lord or no? 
Am 1 His or am I not?" 

1 hope I love Him. Hope is the an- 
chor to the soul, botli sure and stead 
fast, and we learn oi-edience from 
the things we suffer. Afflictions 
are often sent in mercy. I pray 
God to give me faith and that I' may 
bow in humble submission to his will. 

Pray for me and may the Lord 
bless you and keep you. 

Your sister in hope, 

JOSEPHINE POWELL, 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



EXPERIENCE. 

Dear Bro. Gold: — T have had a 
mind to write to you for some time 



104 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



eoncerhing what 1 hope the Lord has 
done for ine. 

When I was twenty-six years old 1 
was made to see myself as 1 was, a 
poor miserable sinner. I was made to 
cry out "Lord what shall I do to be 
saved?" 1 had never before felt the 
need of calling on the Lord for mercy. 
I had been of the world, worldly, hav- 
ing a good time and 1 thought 1 could 
put this trouble from me. Some times 
I could forget it for a while but then 
my trouble would come back and I 
was troubled for about six years. My 
burden got so hard and I began to 
cry to the Lord for mercy more than 
ever. The following for a fact ex- 
pressed my feelings : 

"I had provoked a dreadful God 
and trampled on a Saviour's blood." 

1 saw myself justly condemned. 
When I would go home at night I 
would get the Bible and try to read, 
but every thing condemned me. Sleep 
went from my eyes and many times 
after my family would retire 1 would 
get up and go to a vacant room and 
try to pray. My case only grew worse 
until 1 came to the end of my 
strength. I was made to cry out 
"Lord save, or I perish." These words 
came to me, "This day is salvation 
come into this house," and the first 
thing I knew I was singing this song 

"1 know that my redeemer lives." 
What comfort this sweet sentence 
gives. 

He lives ! He lives ! who once was 
dead. 

He lives! my ever living head." 

Bro. Gold, this was the happiest 
moment of my life. I thought all my 
troubles were over and that I could 
spend the rest of my life in praising 
His holy name. This scripure came 



to my mind, "He brought me up also 
out of an horrible pit, out of the miry 
clay, and set my feet upon a rock and 
established my goings. He has put 
a new song in my mouth : even praise 
unto the Lord." 

1 know 1 am saved by the grace of 
our Lord Jesus Christ if saved at all. 

Your brother in hope, 

DAVID C. STANF1ELD. 
Danville, Va. „ 



EXPERIENCE. 

Dear Brother Gold: — 1 have been 
impressed, tor some time to write you 
what 1 believe has been the dealings 
of the Lord with me. 

My father D. S. Watson, used to 
take the Landmark and when 1 was a 
little girl 1 would slip it out and read 
it, for 1 didn't want anybody to see 
me. 1 loved to read the Bible and 
would read it whenever 1 could. 1 
had serious thoughts about dying and 
often wondered what would become 
of me if 1 should die, When I was 11 
years old 1 was in the corn field hoe- 
ing corn and 1 began to feel that 1 
was a sinner. 1 didn't know what to 
do or what was the matter with me. 
My people asked me what was the 
mater with me and 1 told them I was 
sick, but 1 was sin-sick. 1 went out 
in the woods and prayed the Lord to 
forgive my sins. 1 felt like I could 
not carry such a burden of sin. That 
night after they all went to bed I got 
the Bible and I opened it at a scrip- 
ture which comforted me very much, 
though I can't recall the chapter now. 
My prayer was: "Oh Lord have 
mercy on my soul, hear my prayers." 

I felt like I didn't have a friend in 
Heaven nor earth. As I started to 
lay down the Saviour appeared to me 
on my right hand and the devil on my 
left hand and the Lord said: "Get 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



105 



thee behind me Satan." 1 felt like 
my sins were forgiven and my burden 
Left me. 1 was made to rejoiee and 
every thing was bright and happy. 1 
could then sing praises to the Lord 
with ail my heart In all my trials 
and tribulations after that the Lord 
whispered consolation to my fainting 
heart. 

i wasn't willing to tell of my ex- 
perience and would go to parties and 
dance, do any thing to try to forget 
it, but when I would go to preaching 
1 could not hide my tears. One Sat- 
urday I went to meeting and heard 
Sister Mary Garrett tell her exper- 
ience and she told my feelings better 
than 1 could. It come to me that 1 
was very unworthy, that 1 had tried 
to trample the goodness of the Lord 
under foot. 

1 did wish 1 could tell my troubles 
but 1 went on this way until I was 
twenty and was married. 1 began to 
see what a life 1 had been leading and 
it pleased the Lord to draw my mind 
back to my little hope, if it is one. 

I thought about offering myself 
and would go to Shilo thinking I 
woidd, but would go back home with- 
out doing it. 

i' told my father about it and he 
tried to tell me what my duty was.. So 
when the next opportunity came 1 
went forward and was received. 1 do 
love to read the Landmark and could 
not get along without it, especially 
tl ditorials. 

Your poor unworthy sister, 
JULIA A. GRESIIAM. 
Dacula, Ga. 



I am in need of money with which to 
pay expenses of the Landmark. 

Please send me some, if not all, of 

what is due to the Landmark, and help 
me to carry on the business, and aid 
me in its publication. 

P, 0, GOLt>, 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

"Remore not the ancient landmark 
which thy fathers hare set." 



P. D. GOLD, Witaen, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER Floyd, Va. 



VOL, XLIX. NUMBER 5. 



Entered at the pcjtoffice at Wilson as 
second class matter. 



WILSON, N. C, JAN. 15, 1916. 



EDITORIAL. 



DANIEL, NEBUCHADNEZZAR. 

The stone cut out of the mountain 
without hands. (Sec 2nd chapt. of 
Daniel.) 

Daniel stands emblazoned in the gal- 
axy of Bible characters greatly be- 
loved. As in Enoch, Noah, Abraham, 
Moses and others the enlightening 
gifts of God shine forth in him, and 
God is glorified in them. 

Daniel was raised up a special gift 
in wisdom which is as demonstrated 
in wise behavior. Judah and Ben- 
jamin were carried off into Babylon 
as captives. Babylon was the great- 
est kingdom then on earth, and Nebu- 
chadnezzar was the head of gold of 
that world famous kingdom. The 
conduct of Daniel shines in beauty 
and brightness undimmed in that 
kingdom of idolatry and worldly 
glory, showing that the pure favor of 
God cannot be bribed, nor defiled, nor 
swerved, or corrupted by flatteries of 
muti no? dwIlM, 



106 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



The gentleness, wisdom, honesty 
and sincerity of this prophet shine in 
the kingdom of heaven as a star of 
great brightness. 

His wisdom is conspicuous in his 
youth. He is sought out by the king's 
rule to select wise, ■ honest, active 
young men among captives, and put 
them in service for the king of Baby- 
lon. 

The wisdom of this is apparent for 
it would tend to ingratiate these men 
to the Babylonians, and cause a 
strengthening to the kingdom thus 
served. 

A proof of Daniel's prudence is 
soon manifested. He rejects the wines, 
the dainty meats and enfeebling food 
that tends to becloud the mind, and 
undermine ones manhood, and defile 
his system, and clog it with diseases. 
This royal allowance of wine and 
food the king had appointed for these 
Hebrews, Daniel had resolved that 
he would not defile himself with. The 
Eunuch having charge of this matter 
thought well of Daniel, but was afraid 
that if Daniel did not eat of this al- 
lowance it would be manifest that he 
would not be well favored and flourish 
like those that ate of the king's food. 
Daniel had chosen to eat of simple 
food, and requested that the matter 
might be tested. We are to prove all 
things. Ten days trial was allowed. 
At the end of ten days their counten- 
ances appeared fairer and fatter in 
flesh than all that did eat of the king's 
allowance. 

Do you suppose they smoked cigar- 
ettes and cigars, and chewed tobacco, 
and gorged themsehes with rich dish- 
es, and lived to eat, and made a god 
of their belly, and as gluttons were 
sickly and were taking medicine as 
so many are doing these days. Tem- 
perance is a good thinjr and has its 
reward in health which is a great 
blessing. Daniel was carried a pris- 



oner into Babylon when he was a 
young man, and remained there 70 
years, and returned to Jerusalem thus 
living to ripe age full of honors en- 
during. 

The Lord loved and pitied idola- 
trous Israelites while in Babylon and 
made Daniel a blessing to them, by 
causing him to serve the king of Baby- 
lon to the humbling of Nebuchadnez- 
zar and also the kings of Media and 
Persia. The wisdom of God is correc- 
tive, instructve, healing, saving and 
perfect. 

Daniel's conduct was so- honest, 
simple, sincere and the wisdom guid- 
ing him Avas so perfect that his ene- 
mies said they could find no fault of 
him except in — or concerning the law 
of his God. If a man's conduct is so 
unassailable that no fault can be 
found of it unless it is because of the 
God whom he serves, one ought to 
consider that the law of his God is 
perfect, for if his law is imperfct 
why should that man's conduct be 
without fault? If the conduct pro- 
duced by the law is good and pure 
the law that caused it is good, and if 
the law emanates from the God he 
worships is pure that the God that 
gave that law must be perfect. Men 
are judged by their conduct. By their 
fruits ye shall know them. Make the 
tree good and the fruit will be good. 
If Daniel's conduct is good the -spring 
or fountain from whence it flows must 
be good and pure. 

These men plot for his destruction. 
How? They procure a decree from 
the king that no request shall be made 
for thirty days except to the king. 
Daniel learns of this. They knew he 
prayed to the God of heaven three 
times a day. He kept on thus pray- 
ing three times a day with his win- 
dow open toward Jerusalem. Honesty 
and sincerity mark the conduct of 
those who love and trust God. 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



These enemies of Daniel report the 
case to the king. Why did they ac- 
t-use him and plot his destruction? 
They envied him. It is little, mean, 
vile minds that envy others. One that 
is right himself loves to find others 
that are worthy, and they honor such. 
It is always a proof of a vile charac- 
ter for one to seek to damage an- 
other.- Charity tlunketh no evil, en- 
vies not, renders honor to whom hon- 
or is due. 

When the king is informed of their 
charge against Daniel, whom he loves, 
be labors until sun-down to deliver 
Daniel, but he cannot do this, for he 
cannot change the decree. The object 
of all wise decrees is to protect the 
innocent and punish the guilty. Now 
according to the law Daniel must be 
east into the lion's den. Is he guilty? 
This is to be tested. These enemies 
are the guilty ones, but it is not yet 
proven. The king is greatly distress- 
ed because this beloved man must be 
cast into the den of lions. That night 
the king could not sleep. Early in 
he morning he went to the den of 
lions with a lamentable cry and said, 
Daniel, servant of the living God, 
is thy God whom thou servest con- 
1 nually able to deliver thee from the 
lions. He had been cast in the den of 
lions and a stone was brought and 
laid upon the mouth of the den, and 
the king sealed it with his own sig- 
net and with the signet of his lords, 
that the purpose might not be changed 
concerning Daniel." But there was 
no malice in Daniel nor was there 
guilt in him. His answer to the king 
was wonderful, "0 king live forever. 
My God hath sent his angel and he 
hath shut the lions' mouths, that th^v 
have not hurt me: forasmuch as be- 
fore him innocency was found in me - 
and also before thee 0 king, have T 
done DO hurt." But some were guiltv 
Who? The accusers of Daniel. Now 



107 

the guilty must be punished. Those 
men that accused Daniel were cast 
into the lions' den who had the mast- 
ery over them and their families. 
There are no people like the Lord's 
portion, and there is no god in com- 
parison with Lord God of Israel. 

As an interpreter of dreams and 
visions greatly did Daniel excel. Neb- 
uchadnezzar the greatest king in his 
day, dreamed dreams, in this day a 
man has dreams and visions of the 
night is not considered FAMOUS, yet 
God hath in all ages sealed instruc- 
tion by visions and dreams of the 
night . Nebuchadnezzar dreamed 
dreams^ Many of the great men of 
earth have been warned in dreams. 
The fathers, the prophets, the apostles 
of God, Paul, Peter, John and 
many others were warned in dreams. 

Nebuchadnezzar dreamed and it 
went from him, nor could he tell it. 
He called on his astrologers and wise 
men to interpret his dreams. They 
say unto him, tell us the dream and 
we will tell you the interpretation. 
The king tells them the thing is gone 
from him. Men will state something 
as an interpretation, and you do not 
know whether it is the true interpre- 
tation or not. Jt may sound like it 
might do. Those claiming the gift of 
interpretation will appear ready to 
tell the meaning if you will tell the 
dream. 

The king said, it is gone from me. 
But if you will tell me what I dream- 
ed then I will know that you can tell 
the meaning of in They were a set 
of pretenders. The king learned that 
they were humbugs. He told them if 
they did not tell him what he had 
dreamed that he would have them all 
put to death. 

The decree goes out to slay all of 
these men. When the executioner 
comes to kill them Daniel, who was 
numbered with them, asks why there 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



108 

is such haste; the executioner tells 
Daniel of the king's decree. Daniel 
asks for time, and he ami his fellows 
asks the revealer of secrets to show 
them what tin- kin- had dreamed. It 
was revealed by the God of heaven to 
Daniel in slumbers of the night. Then 
Daniel blest the God of heaven for 
showing such secrets to men. Daniel 
is brought before the king and tells 
him what he had dreamed. The king 
knew at once that was what he had 
dreamed. He fell down before Dan- 
iel and acknowledged that the God of 
Daniel is the true God of heaven, and 
he commanded sweet odours to he 
given, and honors ascribed unto him. 

While the king could not recall nor 
remember what he had dreamed, am! 
ii troubled him, yet as soon as Dan- 
iel told it the king knew it was of 
Cod. and that God was in Daniel of a 
truth, and he fell down and worship- 
ped the God of heaven in the prophet. 

This is a most wonderful vision that 
God showed to the king. 

It was in the image or form of a 
man representing the kingdoms o 
this world. It embodies much history. 
In a few words there is more told of 
the history of nations to the end of 
the world, or for many generations, 
reaching to the end of time than one 
can ever write or learn of divine truth 
from men, unless God seals it to his 
instruction. 

Here is a type of gospel preaching. 
Paul says, if one is preaching the 
truth, and one feeling he is unlearn- 
ed comes into the assembly, and hears 
one speaking of the truth it will tell 
his own case so clearly to him that 
he will feel that the God of heaven is 
in him of a truth, and will fall dowii 
1 worship, and own that God is in 
this interpreter of a truth. But one 
must first have the vision causing 
this distress, and then lie will own 
that he is preaching the truth, and 



will own it and love it. 

But that such preaching or teach- 
ing would seem as idle tales or fool- 
ishness unto one that had never seen 
the vision. 

The woman at Jacob's well knew 
the speaker was Jesus because he told 
her all that had ever been in her 
heart, or all things she had ever 
done. 

What wonderful visions does God 
give. In many different forms they 
come to us. In this ease an image ap- 
peal's with a head of gold, breast and 
arms are of silver, his belly and his 
thighs of brass, his legs of iron, his 
feet part of iron and part of clay. 

This was a terrible image that 
stood before the king that he might 
know the thoughts of his heart. Does 
not one know naturally what are the 
thoughts of his own heart and he a 
great king toot No: he does not 
know them, But when God shows a 
man what he is, and turns him to de- 
struction, and says, return ye children 
of men, then that man knows that 
nothing is hid from God, and that God 
can do every thing, and that no 
thought of the heart can be withhold- 
en from him. That will cause this one 
to worship and give glory to God, and 
to have no confidence in the flesh. The 
woman at Jacob's well said to her 
people, "Come, see a man which told 
me all things that ever 1 did. Is not 
this the Christ?" How sweet and 
blessed it is to have confidence in God, 
feeling that He does all his pleasure 
in the army of heaven, and among the 
inhabitants of earth. God does all his 
pleasure in heaven and in earth. it 
does not mean that wicked men and 
devils purpose to do the will id' God. 
They mean it for evil. Wickedness 
proceeds from the wicked*— not from 
God. Yet God makes the wrath of 
mlan praise him, and restrains the 
remainder of wrath, 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



100 



The king could nut tell what he had 
/reamed, but when Daniel told it the 
king knew that was the truth, and he 
had no doubt but that Daniel gave 
the true interpretation of it. Just as 
when God quickens the sinner dead 
in trespasses and in sins, then there 
is a knowledge given him he did not 
have before, nor can he understand it 
until God makes it plain; then he 
loves and worships God, 

Tlie Image of this wonderful crea- 
ture embodies the great kingdoms of 
earth, the Babylonian, the Persian, the 
Greek and the Roman. The composi- 
tion of the Roman kingdom pari iron 

and part clay, and the ten toes of this 

strength and weakness, and the great 
weigfol of it all crushing this weak- 
ened substance personifies these greet 
kingdoms in which time a stone cut 
out of the mounaitn without hands, 
and it broke in pieces all these king- 
doms, commencing al the feet, and all 
of these powers were finally destroy- 
ed, it mattered not whether they were 
of clay, or iron, brass, silver or gold, 
the coming of Jesus, the stoue cut out 
of the mountain without hands, Of 
without human agency, or aid of m in. 
shall increase in glory and power un- 
til it tills the whole earth, and 
these worldly powers and principles 
shall crumble and fade away, and 
Jesus shall be great to the ends of the 
earth. 

The clay and iron in the toes of this 
image denotes the weakness of the 
image, for a party is no stronger than 
its weakest part. There may be iron, 
brass, silver and gold, but the clay 
has the element of weakness in it. 
The feet an the foundation on which 
the image stands, and there is not 
strength in that which turns to waste 
and perish in tins image. Hut the 
TRIED stone, the chief corner stone, 
elect and precious has the strength of 
eternal youth, the brightness of Cod's 



glory, and the express im.-.ge of his 
person: He must reign until all enem- 
ies are brought under his power. He 
shall make an end of sin and abolish 
death. 

P. D. G. 



STRENGTHENED WITH ALL 
MIGHT. Col. 1:11. 

The inward strengthening is not the 
strength of physical force, mere 
brute force, or giant force, such .is 
Goliath was trusting in, or that the 
natural carnal man trusts in. It is 
not the force or strength of physical 
training, such as base-hall players, 
exult in. or such as hoxcrs display. It 
is not the strength that armies of men 
that drill or engage in battle, exer- 
cise in oi- depend upon. It is not that, 
state of preparedness that nations re- 
sort to consisting of great outlays of 
money, forts, arms and armor that 
men use. 

This is strengthening the INNER 
MAX, not the outer or natural man 
of the flesh, or that is horn of the 
flesh. "That he would grant you, ac- 
cording to the riches of his glory, to 
be strengthened with might by his 
Spirit in the inner man; thai Chrisl 
may dwell in your hearts by faith." 
Eph. :M0-17. 

"I can do all things through Christ 
which strengthens me. For my 
strength is made perfect in weak- 
ness." 2nd Cor. 12:!). 

The strength then is not in any 
sense the strength of man, or of num- 
bers. It is the strength of Christ. 
Nor can man have that strength while 
he is trusting in self. When 1 am 
weak then am I strong. 

What sort of strength is this, and 
how is it displayed, it is the strength 
of Christ. Strengthened with all 
might, according to his plorious pow- 
er, unto all patience and long suffer- 



110 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



ing with joyfulness. 

Who could see any strength in 
Christ, according to the flesh? He 
spake and it was done. It is not by 
might, nor by power, but my spirit 
saith the Lord. In the grave he rest- 
ed in hope. He abolished death in 
dying. He led captivity captive. As 
ihe Philistines could not find where 
Samson's strength lay, as the enemies 
of Jesus could not find how he did 
such mighty works, as excellency of 
speech is not a spiritual weapon, nor 
worldly wisdom, nor learning, as not 
by might, nor by power, but by the 
w tsdom of God — a power confounding 
all fleshly glorying is the patience 
and lon-suffering of God shown. It 
takes away malice, evil speaking, it 
brings forgiveness, compassion, it 
humbles pride. 

We see a display of it in the suf- 
fering of Job. When the purpose of 
God was displayed it showed the 
malice of Job's enemies, as well as 
that he could pray for . them. The 
children of God are purged by afflic- 
tions, also the malice of such as false- 
ly accuse the followers of the Lord is 
sln.wn. It is also for the destruction 
of the flesh, that the Israelite may be 
saved in-the day of the Lord Jesus. 

When the love of the Father's cor- 
recting rod falls on us it causes an in- 
ward heart searching enquiry to rise 
up, and distressing news of our vi'o- 
ness seizes us. We confess to the 
Lord with shame our view of our- 
selves. Then <!od's glory and holiness 
are behind and felt as they never were 
before to us. 

In the furnace of affliction our de- 
ceitful strength is turned into self- 
loathing and Cod alone is exalted, the 
glory oi the Lord appears and we 
are strengthened with mvght by his 
power iii the inner man. By the 
strengrh a Jesus we ive enabled to 



rejoice in tribulation. We lay aside 
all anger, wrath, malice, and with 
joyfulness and love of God we are 
changed from the flesh "to the spirit, 
and the fruit of the spirit is shown in 
the new man, for the fruit of the spir- 
it is love, joy, peace, long suffering, 
gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, 
temperance. 

We love those in whom we see this 
new man put on. We are to put on the 
new man which is renewed in 
knowledge after the image of him 
that created him. Put on therefore as 
the elect of God holy and beloved 
bowels of mercies, kindiu ss, humble- 
ness of mind, meekn-.->s long suffer 
ing, forbearing one ;, no l her, and for 
giving one another, if any man have a 
quarrel against any: even as Christ 
forgave you so also do ye. 

This is doing all things through 
Christ which strengthens you. 

P. D. G. 



WHERE IS THE HEAVEN OF 
HEAVENS AND WHO WILL 
INHERIT IT? 

The Hebrews acknowledged three 
heavens. 1st. The aerial region near 
est the earth. 2nd. The firmament 
above the earth where the planets are 
fixed, and third, the abode of the 
Supreme Being and of angels. Paul 
said he knew a man to be caught up 
into the third heaven. Where God is, 
is heaven, his presence makes heaven- 
ly places. 

David said, "In thy presence is ful- 
ness of joy ; at thy right hand there 
are pleasures forever more." 

We know God, only by revelation 
and only in this way does one obtain 
a correct knowledge of heaven. The 
most High dwelleth not in temples 
made with hands. 

By the mouth of the prophet he said, 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



111 



"heaven is my throne." The hearts 
of his saints are said to be the temple 
of the living God. 

The Saviour said to his disciples, 
"the kingdom of God is within you.'' 

"For we know that if our earthly 
house* of this tabernacle were dis- 
solved, we have a building of God, an 
house not made with hands, eternal 
in the heavens." 

This building or city is described 
by inspiration in the 21st chapter of 
Rev. 

If the spirit of Him that raised 
Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he 
that raised up Christ from the dead 
shall also quicken your mortal bodies 
by his spirit which dwelleth in you. 
The Saviour said, "The time is com- 
ing when all that are in their graves 
shall come forth, they that have done 
good, to the resurrection of life, and 
I hey 1 liat have done evil to the resur- 
rect inn of damnation. 

The Saviour said to Nicodemus, 
"except a man be born again he can- 
not see the Kingdom of God. Man's 
first birth is of a corruptible seed, the 
second, of an incorruptible seed, and 
will abide forever. 

The first man Adam was of the 
earth earthy, but was made a living 
lonl. 

The last Adam a quickening spirit, 
fhe Lord from heaven. The whole hu- 
man race fell in their federal head, 
the first man. All were conceived in 
sin and born in iniquity. Darkness 
covered the earth and gross darkness 
the people, hence man is in ;i kingdom 
of darkness and under the dominion 
of satan, the k'ng of darkness. The 
world by wisdom has never, nor will 
ever know God. 

How are we to obtain heaven ? Not 
by works of righteousness which we 
have done, but according to his mercy 
he saved us, by the washing of re- 



generation, and renewing of the Holy 
ul .Uoi. uod nath made Christ wis- 
dom, righteousness, sanctification 
who knew no sin, to be sin for his peo- 
ple, that they might be made the 
righteousness of God in him. Blessed 
is the man to whom the Lord will not 
impute sin. 

Christ's righteousness is imputed 
to his people and their sins are put 
upon him. There is none other name 
under heaven given among men, 
whereby we must be saved. 

The righteousness of unregener- 
ated persons is, by the mouth of the 
prophet, compared to filthy rags, and 
the same writer says the natural man 
if full of wounds, bruises, and putri- 
fying sores from head to foot. 

1 think the prophet here refers to 
false religion. The apostle Paul said 
"The carnal mind is enmity against 
God; for it is not subject to the law 
of God, neither indeed can be." Again, 
"the natural man understndeth not 
the things of the spirit of God, neither 
can he know them, for they are spir 
'dually discerned. ' ' 

There is a way, an high way: the 
unclean shall not pass over it: but it 
shall be for those: the way-faring 
men though fools, shall not err there- 
in. Christ is this way, the only way 
from earth to heaven. He lifted up 
his eyes to heaven and said, Father, 
the hour is come : glorify thy Son. 
that thy Son also may glorify thee: 
As thou hast given him power over 
all flesh, that he should give eternal 
life to as many as thou hast given 
him. And this is life eternal, that 
they might know thee the only true 
God, and Jesus Christ whom thou has 

P. D. G. 



We print your Minute 0 !, Book and 
Job Work at short notiee and with 
neatness and despatch. 



112 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



Obituaries. 

JANE PITTMAN ALFORD. 

Jane Pittman Alford was born in 
Edgecombe County, but the date of 
her birth is unknown. 

She was married to Edward Alford 
and to this union were born eight chil- 
dren. 

Sister Alford died Sept. 11th, 1914, 
being near eighty years old. 

She joined Lawrence Primitive Bap- 
tist church in Edgecombe County, 
August 1S74, and was baptized by 
Elder William Hell. Sister Alford 
was a humble christian and always 
filled her scat at church as long as 
her health would permit. 

She lost her sight in her old age 
and could not get about much. 

1 visited her in her affliction and 
she was strong in the faith and told 
me she wanted to die. She said she 
wanted to be buried at Lawrence's 
Church. 

Her wish was carried out and her 
funeral was preached by her pastor. 

W. B. STRICKLAND. 
Hobgood, N. C. 



IDA CAUSEY BROWN. 

By request 1 will try to write the 
obituary of Mrs. Ida Causey Brown. 
She was born May 15th, 1879 and 
died -Inly 14th, 1915, making her stay 
on earth thirty-six vtars. 

She was the daughter of Frank and 
Margaret Causey. She was married 
to J. D. Brown, Jan. 10th, 1900. To 
this union were born five children. Be- 
sides these she leaves her husband, 
two brothers and a host of relatives 
and friends to mourn their loss. 

We have a blessed hope that our 
lost is ha*' nU»i'iinl gain, 



Mrs. Brown was not a member of 
any church but was a firm believer in 
the Primitive Baptist faith. 

She was a kind and affectionate 
wife, a loving mother and a loyal 
friend. None knew her but to love 
her. We miss her so much but we 
try to bow in humble submission and 
say: "Thy will be done." 

She has finished her course and we 
hope she is enjoying a crown of 
righteousness laid up for her. 

"Oh the tender love of Mother— 
What can with it compare? 
Always careful, ever hopeful, 
Helping us our burdens bear." 

"Sad and lonely is our home; 
Pale in death our loved one lies. 
She has left her earthly mansion 
For a home beyond the skies." 

J. E. P. 

Tarboro, N. C. 



W. N. PATTERSON. 

After a brief illness, W. N. Patter- 
son departed this lifef— June 17th, 
1915, at his home in Danville, Va. The 
deceased was born in Pittsylvania 
County, but spent most of his life in 
this city. 

He leaves a wife and five children, a 
father, mother, tive brothers and 
three sisters to mourn their loss. 

He was not connected with any 
church, but w r as a great bible leader 
and a sincere believer in the doctrine 
held by Primitive Baptists. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Resolutions on the death of Elder 
T. A. Walton : 

Whereas, God in His wise provi- 
dence and infinite wisdom, has re- 
moved fcum ottf church p«f tolpv«4 



Z1K)N'S LANDMARK. 



113 



pastor, Elder T. A. Walton, and 
whereas, our church in his death has 
lost a most faithful pastor and one of 
its truest, wisest, aud noblest coun- 
selors, in view of our great loss be it 

Resolved, first: That we extend 
our heartfelt sympathy and sincere 
prayer to his wife and son, and other 
members of his family in their great 
bereavement. 

Resolved, second: That a copy of 
these resolutions be forwarded to his 
wife, that they be recorded upon the 
church minutes and sent to the Land- 
mark and Law Counsel for publica- 
tion. 

.My order of Mt. Ararat church in 
Pitts. Co., Va. 

M> II. TOMPKINS, 

Clerk. 



J. J. SHIELDS. 

By request 1 write the obituary of 
our much beloved brother, J. J. 
Shields, who died April 26th, 1910, 
beggtg 58 years old. 

He was born in Pittsylvania County 
Virginia, but has been a resident of 
Danville, Va., for about 20 years, 
where he has many friends. 

Brother Shields had been afflicted 
for 3 years and had to go to church 
on crutches. He made a living for 
his family and gave them a good 
home. He was married twice. His 
first wife was Miss Susie Matthews, 
who died 20 years ago. The following 
children survive this union: W. C. 
Shields, Mrs. j. J. Finch and Mrs. N. 
II. Fergerson. His second wife who 
was Miss Hhoda Patterson is now liv- 
ing. 

Brother Shields was an active mem- 
ber of Malmaison Primitive Baptist 
church, and was a firm believer in 
salvation through grace. 

In all his sufferings he manifested a 
strong and abiding trust in God. 



I had the pleasure of visiting him 
many times and during his last illness 
I tried to comfort him in my feeble 
way. I feel sure that Brother Shields 
is one of the redeemed who will sing 
the new song in the home eternal. 

We can say that our loss is his 
gain. 

He was a kind, true and loving hus- 
band and a good father, and was 
loved and respected by all who knew 
him. 

As a father he moved among his 
children daj by day rehabilitating 
them with a consciousness of the 
reality of life, its purposes, its prog- 
ression and in consummation hereby, 
gradually but surely imbedding into 
their lives a store from, which they 
might draw inspiring usefullness all 
along the path-way of life. 

As a member of the church he was 
faithful, gentle and meek and rested 
in the assurance of his hope being suf- 
ficient, as one knowing in whom he 
believed. He was paralized a few days 
before he died. He said much to com- 
fort his family, saying he believed 
the Lord was with him. He smiled as 
though looking into the faee of Jesus 
and passed away gently into the 
calmness that comes to those who 
sleep in Jesus. 

"Jesus can make the dying bed 
Soft as downy pillows are, 
While on his breast I lean my head 
And breath my life out sweetly there." 

J. H. DIX. 

Danville, Va. 



WILLIAM B. SIMMONS. 

Departed this life Jan. 1st, 1915, at 
the home of his daughter, Mrs. Lewis. 

He lived to the ripe old age of 
ninety-seven, and was loved by alj. 
who knew hin}. 



m 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



Brother Simmons had been in de- 
clining health for some time bin 
seemed brighter up until a few days 
before his death. h '" 1 

Malmaison Primitive Baptist chureh. 

lie was married to .Miss .Malimla 
Wood w ho was a lovable christian 
woman of the Primitive t'aitth, but did 
nol join the church. 

To this union wire born -± daugh- 
ters and <>nc son: Mrs. Sarah llod- 
uett, .Mrs. .Mary Lewis, Mrs. W. T. 
I "a niic, Mrs. Virginia Brandon and 
Mr. W. J. Simmons. 

"Thou shall sleep bat not forever, 
"There shall be a glorious dawn. * 
"We shall meet to part no never 
"On that resurrection morn." 

LOLA HINES. 

Danville, Va. 



THOMAS H. BRUMFIELD. 

Brother Brumfield was born in 
Pittsylvania County, Virginia, May 
3()th, 1836. 

Be was paralized in IflO and died 
August 21st, 1915, aged 79 years, 2 
mouths and 20 days. 

Our beloved brother in the faith, 
was a sincere Baptist, believing in 
salvation by grace alone. 

For a number of years he lived a 
eonsistant member of Whitethorn 
church, where he served as clerk 
faithfully and promptly as long as his 
health would admit. 

The church extends its sympathy to 
the bereaved family. 

Done by order of the church. 
Written by 

F. T. BRUMFIELD. 
Whittles Depot, Va. 



TIME TO PAY UP. 
The Landmark has been behind 
on account of trouble with help 



and machinery in our plant. We 
are now working hard to catch it 
up and hope to have it on time in 
short while. In the meantime we 
trust our subscribers in arrears 
will remit what they are due. 
Quite a number of them are be- 
hind two or three years and we 
have been patient with them on 
account of the hard times through 
the South since the war, but there 
is no good reason at this time 
why they should not promptly 
pay up. 

We need the money and need it 
badly and we hope they will 
promptly respond to this appeal. 

P. D. GOLD. 

Wilson, N. C. 



TAKES OFF DANDRUFF, 

HAIR STOPS FALLING 



Save your Hair! Get a 25 cent bottle 
of Qanderine right now — Also 
stops itching scalp. 

Thin, brittle, colorless and scraggy 
hair is mute evidence of a neglected 
scalp; of dandruff — that awful scurf. 

There is nothing so destructive to 
the hair as dandruff. It robs the hair 
of its lustre, its strength and its very 
life; eventually producing a feverlsh- 
ness and itching of the scalp, which 
if not remedied causes the hair roots 
to shrink, loosen and die — then the 
hair falls out fast. A little Danderlne 
tonight — now — any time — will surely 
save your hair. 

Get a 25 cent bottle of Knowlton's 
Danderine from any drug store. You 
surely can have beautiful hair and lots 
of it if you will just try a little Dan- 
derine. Save your hair! Try it! 



Stops Tobacco Habit. 

Elders' Sanatarium, located at 513 
Main St., St. Joseph, Mo., has pub- 
lished a book showing the deadly ef- 
fect of the tobacco habit, and how it 
can be stopped in three to five days. 

As they are distributing this book 
free, any one wanting a copy should 
send their name and address at once. 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



115 



ELDERS W. R. CRAFT AND J. W. 
WYATT. 

Robersonville — ISat. and 1st Sunday 
in February. 
Bear Grass — Monday. 
Great Swamp — Tuesday. 
Washington — Wednesday. 
Morattock — Thursday. 
Jamesville — Friday, 
fekewarkey— Sat. and 2nd Sunday. 
Spring Green — Monday. 
Hamilton — Tuesday. 
Conoho — Wednesday . 
Hobgood — Thursday. 
Deep Creek — Friday. 
Kehukee — Sat. and 3rd Sunday. 
Williams — Monday. 
Whitakers — Tuesday. 



IF YOUR CHILD IS CROSS, 
FEVERISH, CONSTIPATED 



Look Mother! If tongue is coated, 
cleanse little bowels with "Cali- 
fornia Syrup of Figs." 



Mothers can rest easy after giving 
"California Syrup of Figs," because in 
a few hours all the clogged-up waste, 
sour bile and fermenting food gently 
moves out of the bowels, and you have 
a well, playful child again. 

Sick children needn't be coaxed to 
take this harmless "fruit laxative." 
Millions of mothers keep it handy be- 
cause they know Its action on the 
stomach, liver and bowels is prompt 
and sure. 

Ask your druggist for a 50-cent bot- 
tle of "California Syrup of Figs," which 
contains directions for babies, children 
of all ages and for grown-ups. 



Tob ..ceo Habit Eani'jhed. 

In 48 to 72 hours. No craving for 
tobacco in any form after' first dose. 
Harmless, no habit forming drugs. 
Satisfactory results guaranteed in 
every case. Write Newell I'harmacal 
Co., Dept. !)(), St. Louis, Mo., for Free 
Booklet, "Tobacco Redeemer" and 
positive proof. 



Free Fruit Trees. 

Owing lo the curtailing of our ex- 
port trade and other causes, we lane 
a surplus oi about , 1, . .j'J,u<a) fruit, 
shade, ornamental trees, vines anil 
plants, the finest slock we have, eyer 
grown. To dispose oi this surplus as 
rapidly as possible we nave cut our 
regular prices in hail and will prepay 
the i'reig'ht on all outers amount in- 
to $5 or over. In addition to the 
above discount we are going to give 
absoluely free, 50Q Oklahoma Beauts 
Peach, 500 Voting's Number One 
Peach, 500 Beauty World Apple trees 
and 10,000 Oreensburo Kavorile 
Strawberry Plants as follows: Willi 
each $1.00 purchase your choice of 
these trees or plants to tiie amount of 
fifty cents. Order before thifl gilt 
stock is exhausted. 1 They include the 
finest stock we have ever sold. 

Special discount to Ministers: We 
will allow .Ministers an additional 
discount of fifty per cent, from above 
on fruit trees and fruit plants for their 

Write today for price list and fur- 
ther particulars. Don - -, delay. Refer- 
ence: Bradstreet. or have your bank- 
er investigate us. Greensboro Nurs- 
eries, John A. Young & Sons. Owners. 
Box A, Greensboro, N. C. 



FROST PROOF 

CABBAGE PLANTS 




to tea thousand 75c. l'..st j.ai.l.anv per hundred. 



W. L. KIVETT, 
High Point, N. C. 



Subscribe to The Landmark. 



116 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



ELDERS P. W. WILLI ARD AND 3. 
McMILIAN. 

Burlington — Feb. 14 at night. 
Durham — 15. 
Contentnea — 16. 
Wilson— 17. 
Falls— 18. 

Upper Town Creek— 19 and 20. 

Lower Town Creek — 21. 

Tarboro— 22. 

Cross Roads — 23. 

Robersonville — 24,. 

Spring Green — 25. 

Skewarkey — 26. 

Flat Swamp — 27. 

Dear Grass — 28. 

Smith wicks Creek — 29. 

Oreat Swamp — (March 1. 

Tysons — 2. 

Meadow — 3. 

Farmville — 4 and 5. 

Mewborns> — 6. 

Nahunta — 7. 

Goldsboro — 8. 

Smithfield— 9, 

Four Oaks — 10. 

Benson — 11. 

Clement — 12. 

Fellowship — 13. 

Coats— 14. 



"FIFTY YEARS AMONG THE BAP- 
TISTS. 
Dear Brother Gold: — 
Please allow me to say in the Land- 
mark that I have a few copies of Bene- 
dicts "Fifty Years Among the Bap- 
tists," that I will mail (postage paid) 
to any point in the U. !S. for only $1. 
per copy. Every one knows what this 
book is worth to every student of Bap- 
tist history. 

Mail all orders to, 

A. H. RODEN, 

Glen Rose, Texas. 



To Mothers. 

Don't fear croup. Keep a jar of 
Mother's Joy Salve in the house. It 
will relieve croup and break up a cold 
in ten minutes. Made from pure 
Goose Grease, mutton suit and other 
healing ingredients. It never fails. 
If you or your child have a cough, 
just take a teaspoonful and go to bed, 
and your cough stops at once. For 
croup, rub the chest, then put it on a 
rag and tie it aroung the throat and 
go to bed. In the morning you will 
feel like a thoroughbred. If your 
merchant does not have it, send us 
twenty-five cents and get a large jar. 
Goose Grease Co., Greensboro, N. C. 



Lime Medication 

In Tuberculosis 



starvation.' • In all cases of incipient tuber 
losis there Is a deficiency of calcium. Man> 
1 'aining enough lim " 



trial in such casus, because one of its chief in- 
gredien's is calcium (lime), in such combina- 
tion with other remedial ageuis as to bo 
easily assimilated by the average person. 

binedwith proper diet. 



forming drugs, s 



... .. ...... . e$land$2 

irbottle. Sold l>7 li'Miliiig ('moists or sent 
direct from the Laboratory. Wo wojiM like to 
send you a booklet containing information of 
▼alue and refere 



MOORE'S MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Last summer my health became 
rery poor. 1 went to Moore's Miner- 
al Springs, .n Stokes County, N. C, 
remaining there i:bout 12 clays, 1 re- 
turned home well. 

This water acts on the blood, the 
skin, the bowels, kidneys, stomach, 
catarrh, &c. 

I gladly recommend this water to 
the sick. Hotel open winter and sum 
mer. Water shipped from Rural Hall, 
N. C, at. $1.50 per case of 12 half gal- 
lons and cases to be returned in 30 
d«ys. . P. D. G. 



Send us your Job Printing. 



Z ION'S LANDMARK- 




1916 Calendar 



This chorming gi: - 
vts painted espe- 
cially for us and we hove bed ti e picture 
exquisitely reproduced in 15 colors. 
If you would lihe to read some Htrrertnj 
/act., a»k for The Romance o/C.cj-Col. 
THE COCA-COLA CO. ATI A ? J T A GA 



0. C. DANIELS, M. D. 
Specialist 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. 

Borden Building, Goldsboro, N. ( 



For Emergency Use. 

Every well regulated family should 
keep ou hand a jar of Mentholatum. 

Its uses are various, because it is 
an excellent antiseptic and germicide 
and also a delicate counter irritant — 
just the thing needed for scalds, 
burns, bruises, sprains, chapped skin, 
insect bites and stings. 

Mentholatum is a combination of 
volatile aromatic oils with a heavier 
base. 

In the case of scalds and burns the 
heavy base keeps out the air, a very 
necessary condition. 

The lighter aromatic oils disinfect 
the surface and protect it from infec- 
tion from without. 

The lighter oils also set up a deli- 
cate counter irritation which seems 
to draw thesoreness out of the injured 
part, reducing the inflainmat ion and 



Send us your Job Work. 



10 CENT "CASCARETS" 

FOB LIVER AND BOWELS 



Cure Sick Headache, Constipation, 
Biliousness, Sour Stomach, Bad 
Breath — Candy Cathartic. 



No odds how bad your liver, stom- 
ach or bowels; how much your head 
aches, how miserable you are from 
constipation, indigestion, biliousness 
and sluggish bowels — you always get 
relief with Cascarets. They imme- 
diately cleanse and regulate the stom- 
ach, remove the sour, fermenting food 
and foul gases; take the excess bile 
from the liver and carry off the con- 
stipated waste matter and poison 
from the intestines and bowels. A 
10-cent box from your druggist will 
keep your liver and bowels clean; 
etomach sweet and head clear for 
months. They work while you sleep. 



The next session of the Mill Branch 
Union is to be held with the church at 
Simpson Creek. 



CLEANSE THE BLOOD 

AND JWOID DISEASE 

When your blood is impure, weak, 
thin and debilitated, your system 
becomes susceptible to any or all 
diseases. 

Put your blood in good condition. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla acts directly 
and peculiarly on the blood — it puri- 
fies, enriches and revitalizes it and 
builds up the whole system. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla has stood the 
test of forty years. Get it today. 
It is sure to help you. 



SEND IT IN. 
Send us your printing. We do any and 
all kinds. 

P. D. COLD. 



Renew Your 

Health " 

At Nature's Fountain 

Without the Expense and 
Loss of Time Kecessary 
For a Visit to the Spring 



THE CRISIS 

There comes a time in the life of prac- 
tically every man and woman when their di- 
gestive or eliminative organs, or both, fail 
to respond to drugs prepared by human 
skill. In fact drugs seem to do them 
about as much harm as good for their sys- 
tems rebel against all drugs. These are 
the cases which physicians call "stub- 
born" and 'chronic" for the reason that 
they persist in spite of drug treatment. 1 
do not refer to incurable diseases such as 
cancer and consumption, but to that larger 
class of functional disorders which we meet 
every day, where the organs of digestion 
and elimination are impaired. 

For this class of cases our best physi- 
eians and our big city specialists send 
their wealthy patients to the mineral 
spring* where, in the great majority of 
cases tfcey are permanently restored or 
decidedly benefited. But what about the 
poor man who has not the money or the 
busy man or woman who cannot spend the 
time to snend several weeks or pos- 
sibly months at a health resort? Shall 
circumstances deny them the restoration 
to health which Nature has provided? 
Read my answer in the coupon at the bot- 
tom of this page. 

I have the utmost confidence in the 
Shivnr Mineral Spring Water for to it I owe 
my Restoration to Health and probably my 
Life. It has made me tens of thous- 
ands of friends in all parts of America 
and even in foreign cou* tries, whose 
faces I have never seen. Yet I count 
.hem my friends, for the Shivar 
Spring water has bound them to me 
by lasting gratitude. 

I ask you to read their letters, a few 
samples of which I publish below for your 
benefit, and if you find among them any 
encouragement as to your own health do 
not hesitate to accept my offer v/hich has 
no limits or conditions except those shown 
on the coupon. If you could read the 




letters that come to me daily, numbering 
about ten thousand a year, and the vast 
majority of them similar to those printed 
below, you would not wonder that I make 
this offer displaying my absolute confidence 
in the restorative powers of Shivar Mineral 
Water. 

INDIGESTION 

Savannah, Georgia. 

I was suffering with indigestion, stomach 
and liver disorders and all its train of horri- 
fying phenomena for several months. I had 
lived on milk, soft eggs, shredded wheat, a 
very insufficient diet for an active working 
man, and, of course, from disease and star- 
vation was in a very low state of nervous 
vitality and general debility. I ordered ten 
gallons of your Mineral Water which I used 
continuously, reordering when necessary, 
and in four months gained twenty-nine 
pounds, was strong and perfectly well, and 
have worked practically every d£-' since. 
It acts as a general renovator of the system. 
I prescribe it in my practice, and it has in 
every instance had the desired effects. It 
is essential to use this water In as large 
quantities as possible, for its properties are 
so happily blended and in such proportion 
that they will not disturb the most delicate 
system. It is purely Nature's remedy. 

A. L. R. AXANT, M.D. 
La Grange, Ga., Nov. 25, 1914. 

I feel it my duty to suffering humanity to 
make public announcement of the benefits I 
have derived from Shivar Spring Water. I 
have been a sufferer for the past twenty-five 
years from indigestion and dyspepsia. Afte' 
one week's trial of Shivar Water I c*"~ 
menced to improve, and after drinking . 
for four weeks I gained fifteen pounds, r 
feel better and stronger than I have in 
twenty-five years. I strongly recommend 
this Water to any one with stomach trouble 
of any character, and truly believe It will 
cure uicer of the stomach. I am writing 
this Toluntarily and trust it will fall in the 



hands of many who are bo unfortunate as 

to be afflicted with indigestion and nervous 



V. V. TKU11T, 

President Unity Cotton Mills. 
DYSPEPSIA 
Baltimore, Md., April 30, 1914. 
For many years I suffered with stomacb 
trouble as a direct result of asthma. I 
consulted the very best specialist in this 
country, and spent quite a large sum of 
money in my endeavor to get relief. How- 
ever, I had about come to the conclusion 
that my case was hopeless, but by accident 
I happened to get hold of one of your book- 
lets, and decided to try Shivar Spring Wa- 
ter. After drinking the water for about 
three weeks I was entirely relieved, and 
since thRt time have suffered but little in- 
convenience from my trouble. I cheerfully 
recommended the use of your Wr.ter to any 
one that may be suffering from stomach 
trouble. 

OSCAR T. SMITH, 
Vice-Pres. Young & Seldon Co., Bank Sta- 
tioners. 

Buena Vista, Va., Oct. 2, 1914. 
It is a great pleasure to tell yen that your 
Water has been a great benefit. I may say 
a great blessing, to me. My wlfe> says It 
has helped me more than anything else I 
ever tried. I have been, for thirty >sars, a 
sufferer from stomach trouble. 

REV. E. H. ROWE, 
Co-President Southern Seminary. 
RHEUMATISM 

Leeds, S. C. 
I have tested your Spring Water in sev- 
eral cases of rheumatism, chronic Indiges- 
tkm, kidney and bladder troubles, and in 
nervosa and sick headaches, and find that it 
has acted nicely In each case, and I believe 
that If need continuously for a reasonable 
ttxam will produce a permanent cure. It 
will parity the blood, relieve debility, stimu- 
late the action of the liver, kidneys and 
bladder, aiding them in throwing off all 
poisonous matter. 

C. A. CROSBY, M. D. 

Florence, S, C. 
I suffered with indlbestion and kidney 
tromble, and a year ago was stricken with 
aoute articular rheumatism; was helpless 
far months, and since using your Spring 
Watar I am walking without any crutch 
and Improving daily. Indigestion much re- 
lieved. I wish I could write Shivar Spring 
Water In the sky so that the world could 
become acquainted with it. 

MRS. THEO. KTJKER. 
BILIOUSNESS 
Greenville, S. C, Feb. 26, 1914. 
For orer two years, following a nervous 
break-down, I have suffered with a liver 
m torpid that ordinary remedies were ab- 
lolutaly powerless. Under such circum- 
Jtancee, I came to Shivar Spring, and began 
drinking the Water. Upon advice, however, 
she trst alcht ' took % laxative; the second 



Bight a milder one. Since then I have tak- 
en none at all. The effect of the water has 
been remarkable — its action on my liver 
most marked, and my health and spirit is 
greatly improved. I am satisfied that the 
laxative, followed by the Water, was the 
proper treatment in my case. My condition 
is now perfect. 

S. A. DERIEUX. 
RENAL AND CYSTIC 

Columbia, S. C. 
I suffered for eight years with kidney 
trouble and inflammation of the bladder to 
the extent that I would have to get up dur- 
ing the night some five or six times. After 
using this water only a few days, I am en- 
tirely relieved and suffer no more effect 
of the trouble whatever. 

J. P. D. 

High Point, N. C, Oct. 6, 1914. 

My wife has had a bad kidney trouble 
for several years. She has been using the 
water only about three weeks and it has 
already made her a new woman. Her color 
is much improved her appetite is all that 
she could wish for, her digestion seems to 
be perfect. We give Shivar Springs credit 
for it all. T. G. S. 

GALLSTONES 

Greenville, S. C. 

Shivar Spring Water cured my mother of 
gallstones, or, I might say, it snatched her 
from the hospital door, as the doctors had 
said nothing short of an operation would do 
her any good. After drinking the Water 
she was able to get out of bed, and is today 
stout and healthy. I hope these few lines 
Will be of help to some one suffering as my 
mother did. 

W. J. STRAWN. 
Williamston, N. C, Oct. 3, 1914. 
My doctor said I would have to be operat- 
ed on for gallstones, but since I have been 
drinking your Water I haven't had to have 
a doctor. 

W. H. EDWARDS. 

Fill Out This Coupon and Mall it Today 
Shivar Spring, 

Box 55T, Shelton, S. C. 

Gentlemen: I accept your offer and en- 
close herewith two dollars ($2.00) for 
ten gallons of Shivar Mineral Spring 
Water. I agree to give it a fair trial In 
accordance with the instructions which 
you will send, pnd if I derive no benefit 
therefrom you agree to refund the price 
in full upon the receipt of the two emp- 
ty demijohns, which I agree to return 
promptly. 

Name 

P. O 

Express Office 

Please write distinctly 



120 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



END STOMACH TROUBLE, 

GASES OR DYSPEPSIA 



"Pape's Diapepsin" makes Sick, Sour, 
Gassy Stomachs surely feel fine 
in five minutes. 



If what you just ate is souring on 
your stomach or lies like a lump of 
lead, refusing to digest, or you belch 
gas and eructate sour, undigested 
food, or have a feeling of dizziness, 
heartburn, fullness, nausea, bad taste 
in mouth and stomach-headache, you 
can get blessed relief in five minutes. 
Put an end to stomach trouble forever 
by getting a large fifty-cent case of 
Pape's Diapepsin from any drug store. 
You realize in five minutes how need- 
less It is to suffer from Indigestion, 
dyspepsia or any stomach disorder. 
It's- the quickest, surest stomach doc- 
tor In the world. It's wonderful. 



75 Copies Left. 

If you want a History of The Bap- 
tist Ministers, order soon. Nearly sold 
out. Price $2.00. 

As long as they last we will send 
this History together with Teodosia 
Ernest, and Ten Days In Search Of 
The Church, at the special price of 
$2.75. 

Books highly endorsed by Primitive 
Baptists every where. Order now 
from editor of this paper, or from 
R. H. PITTMAN, 

Luray, Va. 



Our Admitting Department is in 

Charge ef 
Jacobs & Co., Clinton, S. C, 

SOLICITING OFFiCES: 




A BIGGER CAIN 
| A BETTER QUALITY I 

Has no equal for making soap, f 
and for general household uses 
J Made in three forms; solid, granu 
I latedand ball. Five and ten cem 
I cans. Pound can will make fifteen f 
I pounds best quality soap. Insist I 
that your grocer sell you 

1 MENDLESON'S BESTLY 

Sold also in 
bulk for mak- 
ing compost. 



| A. MENDLESON'S ] 
SONS, 



ALBANY, N. Y. 




M. E. Gammon 

Nashville— 101 8th Ave. X J. M. Riddle, Jr. 

Atlanta— Wesley Memorial Bldg._.J. B. Keougb 

Ashevllle, K. C— 121 S. Main St G. H. Ligon 

Philadelphia— 1-121 Arch St A. O'Dnniel 

Richmond. Va.— Murphy Hotel....!. W. I.igon 



SEND US YOUK WOHK. 

P. D. GOLD PUB. CO., 



Geraty'seFrost-Proof ■ ■ 1 

CABBAGE 'PLANTS r KtL 



We will mail free, p 



• of 10 d. 

lure three xo six we. I 
Town plants If plant 
or a month sooner t 

;ea by parcel post, posi 
,r x*.i 600for$1.5*- 



ZP^f LANDMARK 



PUBLISHEED SEMI-MONTHLY 
AT 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Primitive or Old School Baptist 

VOL. XLVIII. WILSON, N. C, FEB. 1, 1915. NUMBER 6. 




P. D. GOLD, Editor Wilson, N. «. 

P. G. LESTER, Asso. Editor Floyd, 



$1.50 PER YEAR. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 

"Ask for the eld paths where k the geod way." 

By the help ef the Lord this paper will contend for the 
ancient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, aad 
strengthened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions aad institutions ef men, 
sad regard only the Bible as tae standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey 
Jesus, the King in the Holy Hill ef Ken, keeping them- 
selves unspotted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery ef the faith in God, 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the 
blessed Comforter. 

KOTI0EI 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new pestoffiees. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what Is due, and atee 
state ins postoftice. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if pos- 
sible, and when he renews give the same name it has bees 
going in, unless he wishes it changed, then he should state 
both the old and the new names. 

If the money sent has net been receipted, please inform 
sse ef it. When you can always send money by money order 
or eheek, or draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren aad friends are requested to set as agents, 

AH names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers ef gospel truth are invited to write for it — if 
so impressed. 

May grace, mercy and penee be multiplied to all lovers 
ef truth. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 



P. B. GOLD. Wnsen, * C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



PREACHING GIFT. 

Dear Brother Gold: Keeling so 
east down, and not able to get out to 
my meetings, I thought 1 would drop 
yon a few lines. 

My health lias been going down 
since I saw yon last, so thai a part of 
my time J have been confined to my 
lied, lint am now at this time some bet- 
ter. 

It ; s a great cross to me to he shut 
off from my brethren. V/hen I could 
labor I was not so lonely. My afflic- 
tion has not been very painful. My 
greatest desire is the welfare of Zion. 

Unit her Cold, the best thing 1 ever 
have done is my feeble effort to serve 
Cod.. Oh that men would praise God 
for his goodness to the children of 
men. 

When 1 was young I had a cross in 
going to serve the churches. Many 
limes I prefered to stay at home and 
labor, not feeling able to preach as I 
wanted to, besides being so anxious to 
carry on my work. Yet being taught 
by his chastening rod to fear God I 
was fearful not to go. And always 
when I would go I was glad when I 
went, and never in all my goings have 
I ever had to regret in trying to serve 
Cod. But now I want to go in the 
service of God and am sorry when I 
cannot go. 

This world has no charms for me 
now. I feel like I have to lay my arm- 



or by. and i hat God has been pleased 
according t<J the riches of his grace to 
give me some evidence of his love to 
me. a poor, vile sinner: so thai 1 am 
made hi hope in Jesus Christ, and be- 
lieve thiit he is my Saviour. I was 
made to taste his love when I was a 
Condemned sinner before a just and 
\ioly Gfld, when I s;iw that his will 
would forever decide my everlasting 
destiny. When my soul was begging 
Cod for mercy at ;i time unexpected 
to me the clouds of darkness were re 
moved, my burden was gone, and 
Jesus was revealed to me as my own 
dear. loving Saviour. Here 1 was 
taught to love Cod because he first 
loved me, and had saved my soul from 
death. 

Right, here T vowed 1o Cod that T 
would cheerfully do anything he re 
required of me for his great name's 
praise. Right here T learned that I 
Avas not able to pay my vows. T was 
afterward taught that T was awfully 
deceived in myself, and T condemned 
in a vow that Cod never required me 
to make Cod afterwards taught me 
that my body was dead, that T could 
not trust it anv longer. When he re- 
vealed to me that he required me to 
preach Jesus Christ T was not the 
man. T could hear so many peoiple 
talking against the Baptists and the 
doctrine T thought I never could, ig- 
norant as T was, attempt to preach the 
doctrine of election and predestina- 



122 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



tion, and I wondered why the brethren 
ever thought such a thing of me. I 
never said anything about my feelings 
to any one. But they would ask me 
to take part in the service ; but I 
would not consent to do it, and I got 
to feeling so bad over the matter I 
thought that God would not let me 
live if I did not serve him. So one 
night before preaching the next day 1 
was wonderfully exercised in mind. 
1 weut to sleep, and rested well until 
about day I was startled to find my- 
self right on the brink of a bottomless 
pit. 1 did see things going into it, and 
I knew they were forever going down- 
ward, felt if moved I would go into 
that pit. While in that condition this 
word flashed through me, as the light- 
ning that lighteneth from one end of 
the heavens to the other, so is my 
word in the earth. At this moment 
the whole place was filled with flashes 
of lightening, and I felt that God was 
going to consume me for my disobed- 
ience. I cried out, if he would spare 
my life I would serve him. Another 
vow. That day I wanted to go to 
church, but afraid to go for fear I 
would be called on to take part. I 
tried to shun the preacher ; but he was 
too fast for me, and asked me to take 
part in the service, and the spirit of 
the devil entered me in a moment, and 
I became angry and said to him, 1 
can't. T had lied to God and felt that 
day that I was condemned. I did not 
feel fit to live or to die. 

But on my way home that evening in 
the lonely woods and by myself I was 
wonderfully and mysteriously arrest- 
ed. I was standing still and looking 
upward. I was filled with the love of 
God inexpressible. Tongue would 
fail, language would not describe that 
love that I felt in my soul that most 
memorable day of my life on earth. I 
never did feel before such a glorious 
visitation of the Holy Spirit of God. 
Nor do T expect it this side of heaven. 



But the lesson 1 learned that day. I 
was regenerated, and had tasted the 
great love of God. 1 rejoiced in the 
doctrine of grace, but, had never been 
delivered from this old body of flesh 
until that day; and 1 never had" the 
power again to say 1 can't serve God. 
But 1 did learn without him I cannot 
do anything, but through him 1 could 
do all things which he required of me 
to be done. 1 know that God is not 
dependent on man for anything, but 
does rule man according to his will. 

With tUis divine teaching 1 have 
been battling on my weak and imper- 
fect manner for forty-three years, and 
yet i have never learned how to 
preach. But I have learned for these 
many years to try to offer my body in 
the service of , God as . often as ' his 
Providence and grace has enabled me 
to do; arid I havt learned that preach- 
ing the gospel of Christ is ©f and 
through the Spirit of God, and not of 
the preacher; yet when the preacher 
is blest with the Spirit, and Jesus is 
gloriously set forth all rejoice to- 
gether; and some think there is per- 
fection in the preacher. But it is only 
given to him by measure of the Spiril 
that gives to every one according to 
their several ability. 

But I am now about to finish in" 
course. I don't feel like saying I have 
fought a good fight, I have to regret 
that I have not lived as devoted to the 
cause of Christ as I ought to have 
done. Hence I am an unprofitable 
servant at best. Yet there is more 
pleasure for me in the service of God 
than anything on earth at present. 

1 see Brother Gold, in your state- 
ment you were married January 22, 
1863. I was married October 5th, 
1863, so we are not far apart in our 
married life. But I feel that if tnj 
life could have been spent as well as 
yours has been I could say with dear 
old Simeon, "Now let thy servant de- 
part in peace," 



MOM'S LANDMARK. 



123 



The doctrine of Jesus Christ, which 
you liave been 'proclaiming so ably for 
so many years does identify the chil- 
dren of God with each other, ft calls 
them with a certain sound to witness 
the things of the Spirit of God which 
his Spirit has planted in their hearts. 

Time and tribulations, losses and 
drosses, so cover up his Christian hope 
thai he doubts whether he has the 
hope or not. But God sends the gos- 
pel to them to tell them again the 
things of the Spirit that God gave 
them why hack in the past life. This 
gospel is the healing word. It heals 
the wounded spirit, comforts the 
mourning soul, and is rest for the 
weary. 

I hope 1 do rejoice in Christ Jesus. 
1 have DO confidence in the flesh, for 
it is but dust. All men in their best 
estate are but vanity. 

1 close with petitions to God for his 
hissings to rest and remain with his 
people now and forever, that his grace 
may continue to uphold and sustain 
you to the end of your days. 

THOMAS* BELL, 

Wampee, S. C. 

Remarks. 

Elder Thomas Bell has proven that 
the Lord has committed unto him the 
ministry of his word so that it seems 
to me that he has given full proof of 
that ministry. 

Sweet has been his companionship 
to me. Such fellowship is one of the 
blessed things of dwelling in this 
unity. 

As we see the shining of the Spirit 
of the Lord Jesus in this humble, 
Faithful servant we can say for me 
to live is Christ, to die is gain. In 
the service here it is Christ in me by 
His Spirit, In the resurrection there 
will he the fulness of Christ revealed, 
so that we shall be satisfied when we 
awake will, his likeness. 

Paid did not say until his course 
was finished that I have Eoughl a good 



fight. Dear Brother Bell has yet some 
lighting to do. But when his race is 
run he will rest from his labors, and 
his works will follow him. P. D. G. 



Elder P. D. Gold, my dear brother, 
and those of like precious faith: 1 
come again in much weakness and 
trembling, never realizing before as 1 
do now, what a sinner and polluted 
worm I am. It seems 1 am the most 
si n lid of all Adam's race, and if God 
had nnt opened my binded eyes to see 
myself 1 would today be wallowing 
sin under my tougue as a sweet mor- 
sel. 

Put then I find I cannot live as 1 
desire — near to Christ from day to 
day— and that is what gives me trou- 
ble; and I think 1 will lay aside the 
pen and not try to write as 1 find 
there is nothing in my writing that 
savors of grace. But when 1 read such 
soul-cheering letters as Sister Tyson, 
Sister Jarrell and Others write and 
your editorials 1 am filled with rap- 
ture and wonder and see only beauty 
and perfection, knowing the Lord 'si 
hand is in it. 

1 wish to say something concerning 
the Pastern Union held with the 
church at Beaulah, Hyde county, N. 
C. We had a [Jnion indeed and in 
truth. We felt Jesus was in our 
midst, and heaven came down our 
souls to greet, and glory crowned 
the mercy seat. Our cups ran over 
and we felt to say, "It was enough." 

There were many visiting brethren 
from Washington county, Goose Creek, 
North Creek and other points. We had 
two ordained preachers and licentiates, 
Elder Tom Sawyer and dear Elder 
Hardy, and they fed us from the 
storehouse of grace until our cups ran 
over and 

"How loath were we to leave the 
place 

Where Jesus showed His smiling 
face." 



124 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Yet we are still joined in heart and 
hope to meet again. And Oh! how 
bright that hope sometimes appears. It 
opens the portals of glory, rends the 
vail and causes as to see with uncloud- 
ed and undimmed sight those things 
God lias prepared for them who love 
ilis appearing those who have grown 
weary, worn and tired of the struggle 
and ready to lay their armor by and 
dwell with Christ at home. 

I ofen wonder, why am 1 here? What 
is my Life? What purpose and good 
am 1? It seems my life has been 
t'raughl with sorrows and disappoint- 
ments, vet God's will must be done. My 
passport is not sealed and 1 can't go 
home. 

"God's purposes ripen fast, 
Unfolding every hour; 
The bud may have a bitter taste, 
But sweet will be the flower." 
So 1 must be still and know lie is 
God. 

Vet we Find our minds and wills are 
crossed and tossed and Ave find our- 
selves murmuring and complaining 
against God and that is why we have 
to be chastened, If we were only obe- 
dient w< would walk in the light of the 
Lord. Vet 1 am sure when we awaken 
in the image of Jesus we shall be sat- 
isfied and not before— when we see 
Him for ourselves and not another. Oh, 
blessed hope! Oh, glorious day! My 
soul leaps forward at the thought. We 
will live in peace at each others' feet ; 
mind not high things, but condescend 
to .nc, i of low degree. Keep tha unity 
of the spirit in bonds of peace and 
dwell together in unity Salute each' 
other with a holy kiss. Love on»i an 
other, love not 'the world, but love 
each other and keep His commands. 
Watch as well as pray and as often as 
ye meet speak of those things. Keep 
th.' faith that was once delivered unto 
the saints that you may abound more 

wort. Little children keep yourselves 



from iuols. Finally, fare you well 
Pray for me. 

Vour sister in bonds, 

EFFIE HAKIMS, 
Swan Quarter, N. C. 



CONFLICT^. 

Dear Brother Gold: Heavy hearted 
this ; moining, 1 desire to address a 
few words to you. Oh! that the Lord 
would enable me to pen a few of my 
thoughts and thereby relieve my east- 
down soul. 

Romans 6:7 reads thus: "For he 
that is dead is freed from sin." 1 be- 
lieve I have spoken to you about this 
scripture, but still it continues with 

For one to be freed from sin he must, 
I believe, be dead to the law by the 
body of Christ, "for sin shall not have 
dominion over you, for ye are not un- 
der the law, but under grace." "But 
now being made free from sin and b i- 
come servants to God, ye have your 
fruit unto holinss and the end ever- 
lasting life." This means our souls an 
freed from sin — freed from that hate- 
ful, dreadful tiling which would send 
us down into everlasting misery and 
woe — were it not that "we have an 
advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ 
the righteous," who bore our sins in 
His own body that we through Him 
might live. 

Blessed is he whose sina( are lot 
given, whose iniquity is pardoned. 
That soul indeed is freed from sin, and 
"whosoever is born of God doth not 
commit sin, for his seed remaineth in 
him, and he cannot sin because he is 
born or God." 

It seems perfectly clear to me then 
that a heaven lorn soul doth not and 
cannot sin. 

3ut how about the flesh — the body 
which is the tabernacle of that soul I 
Is thai too made pure, holy and sin- 
less? Never. The scriptures' tell us 
"There is no man that sinneth not," 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



and "if we say that we have uo sin, 
we deceive ourselves and the truth is 
not in us." I believe this is pertain- 
ing to the flesh— to our natural lives. 
And if 1 know anything about it, every 
soul that has been taught of the Lord 
knows without being told, that he is 
a sinner, is full of sin and iniquity, 
is all unholy and all unclean. Paul 
says, "For 1 know that in me (that is 
in my flesh) dwells no good thing." 
Now, as it is only by death that the 
soul can be freed from sin, so also is it 
only by death that this body can be 
freed ; for as long as we continue in 
this present life shall these old bodies 
sin. Sometimes it seems to me that 
not only is sin mixed with all I do, 
but all that 1 do is sin. 

Now, how can we diverse spirits 
get on together — live in the same 
house ! That is just the trouble with 
rose now. They cannot live peaceably 
together. Each is waging a terrible 
warfare on the other, and the conflict 
is so terrible, the carnage so great, that 
I sometimes feel like this old tenement 
of clay is tottering, giving away and 
about to be consumed and destroyed. 

And what if it is How sweelly 
it is spokon, "For we know that if our 
earthly house of this tabernacle w n re 
dissolved, we have a building of God. a 
house not made with hands eternal in 
the heavens." And O! how my tired 
soul longs to be a blessed inhabitant 
there — longs for the time and place 
w here there is no sin, no sorrow, no 
bitter beart-aches hot sad farewells. 
W hen mine eyes are closed in that last 
long sleep, and my hands are folded in 
death, then and not 'till then, will this 
old bo : y I).- freed from sin. 

I don't know whether ii is righl or 
not. Imt I sometimes feel to ask the 
Lord to has) en flie day when not only 
iny soul, but my body also shall lie 
freed I'ri, in sin. How I long to see the 
dawning of that glorious day, "'when 
all but love will be done away." 



"There will be no sorrow there 

In heaven above where all is love, 

There'll be no sorrow there." 

Desiring an interest in the prayers 
of all who can feel to pray for a poor, 
miserable sinner, 1 am as ever, 
Unworthily, 
MARY JEFFERSON THIGPEN. 
Wilson, N. C, Rl, Hill View Farm. 



PRAYER. 

Greenville, N. C, Dec. 3, 1!)14. 
Dear Brother Gold: 

1 felt cast down yesterday and a 
great cloud of darkness did so hide 
from me Hie things of Cod and Christ 
that I was as if 1 had never seen or 
known them in my life. 'Oh! wretched 
state of deep despair! To see my Cod, 
remove and fix my doleful station 
where 1 must not taste his love." All 
during the day 1 was praying unto 
God to remove that miserable, wretch- 
ed state from me. At sunset my bur- 
den grew heavier, and when 1 rose 
from pra^ef again 1 began reading 
Bunyan's book. These lines were! a 
great comfort to me. "Oh, it is a 
goodly thing to be on our knees with- 
Christ, in our arms before Hod." After 
reading this I turned to the fourth 
stage in which he wt ites of the valley 
of the shadow of death," and a Chris- 
tian must need go through it because 
the way to the celestial city lay 
through the midst of it. Now tins val- 
ley is a very solitary place. The proph- 
et Jeremiah thus describes it, "A wil- 
derness, a land of deserts, and pits, a 
land of drought and of the shadow of 
death, a land that no man (but a 
Christian I passeth through, and where 
no man dwelt." Jer. 2 And as I 
read on further I found this scripture, 
"He h.it Ii turned the shadow of death 
into the morning." Amos 5:8. All of 
this did so strengthen me and I was 
made to rejoice, "Trust in him at all 
times, ye people, pom- out your heart 



126 



DION'S LANDMARK. 



before him. Guu is a refuge for us." 
"Holy Spirit hover near me, 

Till this life of death is done. 
Then in Christian triupnih bear me 

To the Almigety three in one." 

Your little sister in hope, 

BESSIE BROOKS. 

Written July 28, 1914. 



EXPERIENCE. 
Dear Brother Gold: 1 am sending 
for publication my little experience, if 
I have any; my dear father joiued the 
church since 1 wrote it. I am also in 
closing $1.50 for subscription to the 
dear old Landmark, which papa and 
myself cujoy reading so much, If 1 
can 1 will send you some more sub- 
scriptions. Bray for me. 
Your sister, I ho»pe, 
(MISS) MATTIE E. CLAYTON. 

Elder P D. Gold, 
Dear Brother: 

I5y request of some of the dear 
brethren and sisters 1 will write what 
1 hope is some of the Lord's dealings 
with me. 

I feel my unworthiness and imper- 
fection yet 1 hope the dear brethren 
and sisters who chanccto read this 
will cast a mantle of charity over me 
and ask God, if J am deceived to unde- 
ceive me. 

I sometimes feel that I am deceived 
about the whole matter, but I can look- 
back over my past life and realize 
there has been a change in some way 
for the things I once; loved I now 
hate, and the things I once hated I 
now love. But whether it is of the 
Lord or not 1 can't tell, but at times 
I feel like it is. 

1 was born in 1895. My parents 
were not church members, but we 
would go and hear all preach, although 
my preference was Ebeuezer or AVhee- 
lers more than anywhere else. But it 
seemed 1 was as good as any of them 
until the fourth Sunday in January 



1913, when I was made to realize that 
1 was a poor helpless sinner in the sight 
of Ood. 1 was singing and suddenly i 
looked around and everybody seemed 
so happy 1 began to cry and begged 
the Lord to have mercy on me. The 
following week was the most miserable 
one ever spent, but on Friday night 
1 went to a frolic. 1 did not feel Like 
1 could play, but went just to keep 
them from thinking anything unusual 
was the matter with me. 1 played, 
however, thinking of uiysolf and of 
my lost and ruined condition all tin 
while and the very breathing of my 
soul was, Lord have mercy on me. 

I continued in this way until the sec- 
ond Sunday in May when Uncle Henry 
and Sister Rice, a friend whom I had 
been with all winter, were to be bap- 
tized. 1 did not want to see it and 
went up stairs after Sister and Papa 
had gone and fell on my knees and 
begged the Lord to have mercy. If 
seemed the prayer went no higher than 
my head. But that night before I weld 
to bed these words came to me, 
"Blessed are they that mourn for they 
shall be comfortd." I could not sleep 
for praising my Lord. 

J thought 1 would say something to 
sister, but felt she would make fun of 

On Tuesday after the third Sunday 
in June 1 was helping papa work in 

in the West with heavy thunder. I 
looked up and saw the prettiest cross 
and on it in large letters just above 
the cross were the words "Follow 
me." 

1 promised the Lord if He would 
spare me through that week 1 would 
ask for a home the next Sunday. Bill 
when Sunday came I was led to Whee- 
lers, thinking Ebenezer was not the 
place for me. 

On Friday before the second Sunday 
I went over to Uncle Henry Smith's, 
where that night they had preaching 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



127 



and Brothqr Ball preached my feel- 
ings better than 1 could liave told 
them. J was to stay there and go to 
church with them in tlie morning. But 
before we started to church and while 
on the porch Brother Hall asked me if 
J was going to church to join. I told 
him I was not and turned back and 
went into the house. 

1 got ready and went on before the 
real of them started and idt seemed to 
me that they would never .get there. I 
felt 1 was one of the meanest persons 
on earth. After service when the door 
of the church was opened Aunt Mattie 
Smith and several others went for- 
ward but 1 did not know it at the 
time and neither did 1 know anything 
until I gave Brother Hall my hand 
and was telling him what I hope the 
Lord laid done for me. To my joy, I 
was received and the next day, July 
L3. L913, 1 was baptized by our be- 
loved pastor, Elder J. J. Hall. 

That day, together with several 
others, were the happiest of my life. 
The burden I had carried for six 
months had gone and not a wave of 
trouble crossed my peaceful breast. I 
felt free from all worldly cares and T 
Wanted to tell to all around what a 
deai- Savior I had found. 

J have never regretted the day I 
joined the church. Dear old "Wheeler's 
has heen a sweet resting place to me. 
The church is a home for God's hum- 
hie »poor. 

At times I have many doubts and 
fears, yet a hope springs up in my 
heart that makes me rise above all 
trouble. 

As the poet says: 
"I want to live a Christian here, 

1 want to die rejoicing; 
1 want to feel my Savior near 

"When soul and body's parting. " 

Well, 1 guess 1 had better close, as 
I don't feel that I can or have writ- 
ten anything that would be of any in- 
terest tc God's little ones. 



Asking all who may read this to re- 
member me when at a throne of grace. 
If a sister the least of all, 

MATTIE CLAYTON. 

Hurdle Mills, N. C. 

Wilson, N. C, Jan. 18, 1915. 
Mr. P. D. Cold, greeting: 

''Ask lor the old paths where is 
the good way." 

In Isaiah 45:2, "I form the light, 
and create darkness: 1 make peace 
and create evil: 1, the Lord, do all 
these things." 

Now, if you please, tell me through 
the Landmark why God created evil. 

JOSHUA 1IAYNES. 

REMARKS. 
It is plain from the leaching of this 
chapter and from the Bible, as well as 
the works of creation, as well as from 
the operation of Providence that 
there is no God beside the Lord of 
heaven and |earth. Shall the thing 
formed say to him that formed 4t, 
why hast thou made me thus? Hath 
not the potter power over the clay, of 
the samp lump, to make one vessel 
to honor and another unto dishon- 
or? God is the 'potter or maker, and 
man is the creature made or fashion- 
ed. 

Our friend admits the Lord makes 
peace and creates evil. One of our 
gifted preachers said to anothr very 
gifted one, ""What did Christ write 
when he stooped down and wrote on 
the ground." The bther replied. 1 
do not know. Then the first preacher 
said, when I go home I shall tell my 
people 1 asked the most gifted preach- 
er we have a question he could not an- 
swer. Yes, the other said, this is true, 
and tell them also that a fool can 
ask a question a philosopher cannot 
answer 

I am not able to tell why the eter- 
nal God does as he does, but consider 
the answer of Jesus who said, "I 



128 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



thank thee, 0 Father, Lord of heaven 
and earth, because thou hast hid these 
things Eroru the wise and prudent; 
and revealed them unto bahes. Even 
so. Father, for it seemed good in thy 
sight.' 

One of the things important Tor me 
to know is that 1 am a fool. 
Job said shall we receive good at the 
hand of the Lord, and shall we out 
receive evil? What did Job mean by 
evil.' He meant t he opposite of good, 
as darkness is the opposite of light. 
God makes both light and darkness. 
The more we see of light and dark- 
ness, its o-pposite, the more we know 
of the glorious power of God. Job had 
been receiving the goodness of God in 
his prosperity, hut after this he was 
receiving evil or great distress and 
suffering. We say' Satan afflicted Job 
with sore boils, hut he could not do 
that, unless the Lord had permitted 
Satan to do this. Satan intended it 
for evil, because he hates God and his 
people; hut' God showed in this he 
loved Job, and proved to him that 
(iod is very merciful. No doubt in 
the end Job learned more of God 
while he was in the devil's hand than 
he had ever learned before, and thus 
blessed God more after this than he 
ever had before. It is a deeper and 
greater display of God's mercy and 
wisdom, his power and grace, than he 
had ever known before. 

All God's works praise him, and his 
saints shall bless him. When his 
saints see that God makes the wrath 
of man praise him it shows man that 
God has power above all wicked men 
and devils, so that where sin abound- 
ed unto death there grace reigns 
through rightousness unto eternal 
life by Jesus Christ our Lord, so that 
this love shed abroad in the heart of 
a sinner caused that sinner to love and 
adore God more than the creature 
Adam ever loved God before his trans- 
gression. No doubt but the Lord God 



does his pleasure with the aighesl and 
greatesl reason, and proves that there 
is no God beside the Lord who is a 
.ins! (iod and a Saviour. 

But shall we commit sin thai grace 
may abound/ (iod forbid. How shall 
we that are dead to sin live any 
longer therein:' A man with a good 
motive could not commit a sin: but 
where sin abounded grace did much 
more abound: "0 the depth of the 
riches both of the wisdom and know! 
edge of (iod ; how unsearchable are his 
judgments, and his ways past finding 
out. For who hath known the mind 
of the Lord? or who hath been his 
counsellor:' or who hath first given 
to him, and it shall be recompensed 
unto him aagin? For of Him, and 
through Him, and to Him are all 
things, to whom be glory forever 
Amen." Rom. 11 : ;i;i-3<i. 

Sin is not a creature. It ix the trans 
gression of the law. It is an act of 
man or devil. None but devil or man 
can sin. None but (iod can forgive 
sin, and make an end of it. 

The lear of the Lord is to hate evi 1 
P.D.G. 



MACOMB, M'DONOUGH CO., ILL. 

Jan. 15, 1915. 

Elder T. D. Gold. 

Dear Brother: 1 wish to express to 
you how much 1 appreciate your writ- 
ings. 

I don't want to miss one number. I 
am in my 95th year. I am not well. I 
can work some. 

Your paper sustains the doctrine I 
believe in. 

Please let me know if you get this. 
I wish to be remembered by you. 

Your unworthy sister, 

LUCINDA VAN METER, 
R. R. 7, Box 66, Macomb, Illinois. 

Remarks. 

Our dear sister, Van Meter is the 
widow of Elder I. N. Van Meter, who 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



L29 



long since departed this Life, fulling 
aseep in Jesus, He was a gifted writer 
and preacher! Sister Van Meter's life 
is remarkably preserved, her mind clear 
and her love of truth abides. P, D. G. 



COMMUNICATION. 

.My Dear Brother Hall: After hear- 
ing you talk that evening at Sister Ra- 
pier's, and later reading your good 
Letter to Brother Dodson, 1 felt that 
1 wanted to write you some feelings 1 
had similar to the one you had in con- 
ned ion with Jesus being head over all 
things to the church which is His body. 

I believe 1 wrote something of this 
to Brother Gardner once — and you may 
have read it, however, taking it for 
granted that you did not. L will write. 

With much force this scripture came 
to me: "Except the Lord build the 
bouse they labor in vain that build it." 
Over and over the words went in my 
mind till I began to wonder what kind 
of building was meant. It seems to me 
it was the house that Wisdom hath 
budded— the House of the Lord. 

1, like you, was made to wonder if 
it were possible that I was any part 
of this building. I realize that all 
things were possible with God and then 
I thought of the precious hope I had 
of seeing my Savior, God, some sweet 
day, and I felt that surely He had ap- 
pointed my soul a place. What could 
I be? Could it be that I was a brick 
or stone in the underpinning. And I 
said no, this cannot be. I am not so 
important; I do not help to support or 
hold up the church. What then a part 
of the ornaments or decoration of the 
building? I shuddered to think even 
of such a thing. No, no, indeed; I 
feel to know that I do not ornament 
the profession I have made, nor in 
any wise add beauty to the church mili- 
tant. Hqw about a pane of glass in a" 
window? No, neither can that be, for 
surely none can look through me and 



behold tlie beauties on the inside. My 
daily life and walk is not such that 
the world can see the church through 
me. I almost gave up. There it seem- 
ed like every place was too important 
for poor me. Surely I had not part 
nor lot in it — and was not made to 
fit in that wonderful house whose 
builder and maker is God. 

And I had about come to the conclu- 
sion that I must be a sawed-off end of 
a plank — full of knots and with the 
bark still on, a piece utterly rejected 
by the Builder, I had the sweetest feel- 
ing come over me and I was made 1< 
hope that I was only a few inches of 
floor space down at the brethren's Eeel 
— don't you see — of very little service. 
Would hardly be missed it' it were 
slipped out. Yet it fitted in its place 
just the same. I feel like saying glory 
to God if this be true. If I am number- 
ed among the timbers of His house. 

Now, Brother Hall, these thoughts 
arc so much like yours (only 1 can't 
extpress them as you did) that satan 
whispers to me that you will think I 
am trying to imitate you — that I am 
trying to be something too. Did 1 say 
whispers? Nay, he is shouting it in my 
ears. I can ony say that, I had these 
thoughts several years ago, and it, did 
me good to know some one else felt the 
way I did. But enough about this. 
How has it been with you since the 
yearly meeting? 

I hope you have not been so low 
down all this time as I have. . I seem 
to dwell in the land of the shadow of 
death. My pathway is so thorny T 
feel that my weary feet are sore and 
bleeding. 

A good sister told me the other day 
that she felt like I was a deep well, 
and immediately I felt so, too. But 
I felt to be a deep dry well, a pitfall, 
a menace to the children of God. An 
old well, even though it does have a 
Little water in it is an undesirable thing 



130 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



someone is liable to fall into it, or 
else there is the chance of mosquitoes 
ami other pests breeding there, and of 
what account is an old well? 

My nrother, I feel so useless. What 
;imi I : uv! 1 feel to be no good to any- 
one and often feel that it would lie 
better if 1 were not here. Do you 
ever feel this way? 

I have so much fellowship for old 
Hannah when she said: "I am a 
woman of a sorrowful spirit." For 
that expresses my feelings. In much 
sorrow do 1 journey here, anxiously 
awaiting the day when by grace 1 hope 
■<> In ,i! my blessed Savior say: "Come 
up higher." 

I believe I feel as Paul did when 
lie said: "I am persecuted, but not 
forsaken; cast down but not destroy- 
ed." But 1 do feel that "the Father 
hath not left me alone." Even though I 
cannot realize His presence, yet I can 
look back at many times and say, 
"Surely, lie was in the place and I 
knew it not." 

I don 't know why I have written you 
again. I hope you will look over the 
n any errors I have made and pardon 
mi r<r thus intruding again and re- 
member my love to Sister Hall, and her 
molber and grandmother. 

When you feel to be the poorest mor- 
tal on earth remember one who feels 
that way too. 

MARY JOHNSON TIIIGPEN. 
Wilson, N. C, Rl, Hall View Farm. 



Dear Brother Gold: Your good let- 
ter was received several days ago, and I 
was glad to hear from you and to know 
that you were well. Since I wrote you 
I spent most two weeks with my sister 
in Salisbury. The doctors pronounced 
me out of danger and ready to leave 
the hospital ; so T went to spend a few 
days with my sister until I was able to 
make the trip home, but my side would 
not heal and I had to come back — have 



been here in all 2u days, and will be 
here a few days longer. I am improv- 
ing nicely now, and hope I will soon 
be well. 

1 believe I went on the operating ta- 
ble fully reconciled to whatever my lot 
might be. I was not a particle excited. 
But O what agonies upon waking. I 
believe 1 realized what it was to die, 
without the sting of death being taken 
away. 

Much of the time, after that, for two 
weeks, seems very dreamlike. Then I 
grew more into a knowledge of my sit- 
uation, as it were, to realize that the 
manifold mercies of God bad betft 
showered upon me without number; and 
yet with that feeling that I could not 
be thankful, as I desired to be, to Him 
whom [ could faintly trust had brought 
me "safe thus far." I have not at 
any time been in a state of great re- 
joicing, but just a calm, sweet reconcil- 
iation that I cannot, of myself, become 
in possession of. The sweetest thing 
to me has been the old hymn, "How 
Firm a Foundation." 

It has been a comfort and company 
for me since I have been convalescing ; 
reviving my hope and renewing my 
strength to a suficiency for my day. 
Pray for me, that I may be kept by 
the power of God ; and I realize that 
He sometimes, in His power, keeps us 
by the rod of affliction. With love 
and good wishes to you and yours, to- 
gether with the household of faith, 
(should they chance to see this) this 
Christmas day. I am, I trust, 

Your little girl in hope, 
LOUISA A. EDWARDS COFFEY. 

Statesville, N. C, Dec. 2. r >, 1914. 



COMMUNICATION. 

My dear kindred in Christ (if I may 
be permitted to claim that precious 
relationship) : 'Blessed are ye when all 
manner of evil shall be spoken of you; 
rejoice and be exceeding glad for great 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



131 



is your reward in heaven." 

I have for some time been so impress- 
ed and burdened in mind to write a few 
lines for the Landmark that I will this 
morning try, hoping the impression is 
of the Lord. 

I put off writing from time to time 
because 1 had nothing to say that I felt 
was from Him, but I feel that He has 
this day given me the 26, 27 and 28 
chapters of the Psalms as a witness to 
my own heart and sufferings winch I 
feasted ©pon as they expresed and told 
my feelings better than 1 could. 

He exhorteth unto God and sustaiu- 
cth his faith and prayeth against his 
enemies, as I have tried to do. 1 feel 
that our trials are for our good in sep- 
arating His little ones from the world 
and drawing them nearer to Him, show- 
ing them they must live by faith and 
not by sight. 1 hope the brethren will 
read these Psalms as they bear such 
testimony to my feelings and are sweet 
and comforting to me and those who 
have tasted the goodness and mercies of 
God. His words are a lam»p unto our 
feet and a lighl unto our path. 

I am often meditating over my little 
hope and experience, wondering if 
these precious truths and promises are 
For me loo. Am I His or am 1 not. 'Tis 
a hope for a hope. So let us press hope- 
fully onward, thinking through eacli 
wearisome day that the toils of the road 
will seem nothing when we get to the 
end of the way. 

The Lord is our Shepherd ; we shall 
not want. He maketh us lie down in 
green pastures and leadeth us by the 
still waters. 

Prethren, please pray for me an 
mine. 

In much love to all, 
FANNIE COBB SPEIGHT. 



CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 
Elder J. T. Collier's address is 
changes from Kcnly, N. C, R. F. D. to 
Micro, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



'"Remove not the ancient landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



P. D. GOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



VOL. XLVlil. NUMBER (i 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson as 
1 class matter. 



WILSON, N. C, FEBRUARY 1. Dir. 



EDITORIAL 

LAST DAYS. 

Brother L. J. Piner requests my 
view of Isaiah 2:4-,"). "And he shall 
judge among the nations, and shall 
rebuke many people; and they shall 
beat their swords into plow shares, 
and their spears into pruning hooks: 
nation shall not lill up sword against 
nation, neither shall they learn war 
any more. 

0, house of Jacob, come ye, and let 
us walk in the light of the Lord." 

Isaiah equals any prophet in the 
clearness and glory in his utterances. 
His prophesies reach to the last days 
of time when he lived in the shadows 
and the gloomy night of the legal dis- 
pensation, veiled within the curtain of 
sackcloth, and in ashes, it was of vast 
concern to him to proclaim good things 
to come. Hence his urgent exhorta- 
tion to the house of Jacob to walk in 
the light of the Lord. 

In tins glorious time the mountain 
of the Lord's house shall be establish- 
ed in the top of the mountains. As 
mountains are higher than any other 



132 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



places, so the kingdom or church of 
God should he exalted, purer, higher 
than any or all other powers or king- 
doms, and all nations should -flow 
unto this blessed Mount Zion. 

Then shall many go up to the 
Lord's house and say, let us go up to 
the house of the Lord, and he will 
teach us his ways, and we will walk 
in his paths: for out of Zion shall go 
forth the law, and the word of the 
Lord from Jerusalem. It is a gra- 
cious, ennobling power that raises 
fallen man from the sordid, base ways 
of man to the pure, heavenly way of 
the Lord. Surely all those that love 
him shall come to Mount Zion, the city 
of the living Ciod, the heavenly Jeru- 
salem. 

And he, the Lord Jesus, shall judge 
anion" the nations, and shall rebuke 
many people. Those he rebukes shall 
lie humble, and hate their own ways, 
and shall learn war no more, but they 
shall beat their swords into plow 
shaics, and their spears into pruning 
hooks. What a wonderful change 
does the coming of the meek and 
lowly Jesus manifest as he turns the 
wolf nature, or brings under that 
wolf nature, from its destructive, war- 
like ways, and such become followers 
of the meek and lowly Jesus. Laying 
aside all wrath, anger and malice, and 
putting on bowels of mercy, lowliness 
of mind, and heart, forgiving enemies, 
•praying for the peace of Jerusalem; 
and as they have received Christ Je- 
sus the Lord so walking in him, root- 
ed and grounded in love. This is the 
greatest change ever wrought in the 
proud spirit of man. 

Instead of nursing pride, wrath and 
malice, and manufacturing weapons 
of war, they beat their swords into 
plowshares, ami their ' spears into 
pruning hooks. Instead of fighting 
and slaying others, they find they 
have foes in their own house or na- 
turethat bring them into grief. 



Self discipline and the mortifying 
of their members in, and ruling their 
own spirit, is greater than taking cit- 
ies. Plow shares subdue the weeds 
that injure the fruits of the garden, 
and beating the spears into pruning 
hooks that will bring self-denial, and 
starve out foolish and hurtful lusts. 
He that puts off the old man with his 
deeds, and puts on the new man is 
courageous. Therefore will the true 
soldier of the cross put on the whole 
armor of God, and finish his course 
in the faith. 

They learn war no more. 

How beautiful are they who pub- 
lish peace, that say unto Zion behold 
thy God reigneth, and that follow the 
Lamb withersoever he goeth. 

Do you see the contrast with a na- 
tion whose citizens pursue the path of 
industry, honesty and economy, which 
builds up the country, and helps his 
fellow citizens; and another nation 
that lusts or covets what belongs to 
others, and seeks by the crooked strat- 
egy of war to tear down, kill, rob, 
plunder and destroy others, bringing 
sorrow, mourning, desolation and 
death among the people? 

What a burden is a standing army. 
What corrupt principles are harbor- 
ed, nursed and fattened in the beastly 
natures of those trained to war. It is 
pride and cruelty glossed in the armor 
of craft, revenge, hatred bolstered by 
the rules of falsely claimed honor, 
but lacking in every principle of true 
love. 

When will this be fulfilled. It is 
not fulfilled by this world. Are the 
principal European nations dragged 
down into filth and shame of blood- 
shed that will stain them while time 
lasts with us fulfilling them? 

But Jesus, the prince of peace, 
judges among the people, and wher- 
ever he dwells there are those that 
learn war no more, for the God of 
peace makes wars to cease. P. D. G. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



13b 



NO MAX KNOWS WHEN. 

"For the son of nian is as a man 
taking a far journey, who left his 
house, and gave authority to his ser- 
vants, and to every man his work, and 
commanded the porter to watch." 
Mark 13:34. 

This chapter is 'prophetic of the de- 
struction of the temple, of the scat- 
tering of the Jewish nation, of the 
passing away of that dispensation, of 
the ushering in of the gospel kingdom, 
with caution of the need of watchful- 
ness. 

1. The disciples call the attention of 
Jesus to the goodly stones of the tem- 
ple. Ue answers, the time will come 
when not one stone shall be left on 
another. 

2. This greatly surprises them. We 
judge that things will endure that 
have apparent solidity. But we should 
not judge by appearance. All that 
we see must perish. . 

3. The disciples desire to know 
when shall these things be, and what 
shall be the sign of his coming, and of 
the end of the world. He tells them 
the destruction of the temple, and the 
scattering of that nation should be 
within the days of the generation then 
living, and he gives them signs by 
which this might be known. One cau- 
tion he emphasizes is, "Let no man 
deceive you." Many shall come in 
his name, saying, I am Christ, and 
shall deceive many. Go notaf ter them. 

4. After the crucifixion and resur- 
rection of Jesus Christ and his exalt- 
tion the 'passing away of that first 
Jewish heaven, the gospel having 
been preached in all the world, and 
the church of Jesus Christ is! built 
that the gates of hell shall never pre- 
vail against, He as the Son of man tak- 
ing a far journey who left his house 
and gave authority to his servants 
ami to every man his work, and com- 
manded the porter to watch. 



When the disciples saw a bright 
cloud receive him out of their sight, 
as they gazed up into heaven, men in 
shining apparel appeared to them, and 
said, ye men oi Galilee, why stand ye 
gazing up into heaven. This same Je- 
sus which is taken from you into 
heaven shall so come in like manner, 
as ye have seen him go into heaven. 
Acts 1:11. There are declarations 
which it would seem caused the dis- 
ciples to think it would be a short 
space of time before he would come 
again. Many words of scripture de- 
clare that he shall come again with 
great power and authority, and that 
all judgment is given into his hand. 
For as it is appointed unto men once 
to die, and after this the judgment, so 
Christ was once offered to bear the 
sins of many, and unto them that 
look for him shall he appear the sec- 
ond time without sin unto salvation. 
Those that love his appearing shall 
welcome him. He came the first time 
bearing the sin of his people, but he 
put that away by the sacrifice of him- 
self. In Ins second coming he shall 
raise his people that are in then- 
graves, change their vile bodies, fash- 
ion their bodies like unto his glorious 
body, and present them perfect be- 
fore the Father's throne with exceed- 
ing joy 

When or how long until this most 
wonderful event shall take place no 
man knows, not even the angels in 
heaven, nor the Son himself, but the 
Father only. 

The house the Son of man left is 
the church of God with the order of 
the house complete, giving authority 
to his servants, and to every man his 
work. He has set in the church first 
apostles. He said to them, in the res- 
urrection when the Son of man shall 
sit in the throne of his glory, ye als-o 
shall sit upon twelve thrones judging 
the twelve tribes of Israel. As men 
the apostles are dead, but judging in 



134 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Israel their authority as judges is 
full. What they loose in heaven is 
loosed 011 earth, and what they bind 
in heaven is bound on earth. Their 
word of inspiration is binding now. 
They have no successors, nor can they 
delegate any power or authority to 
any other. Each one abides in his lot. 
It is also thus of the prophets and pas- 
tors and teachers, gifts, helps, govern- 
ments for the perfecting of the saints 
until every one grows up to the full 
stature of a man in Christ Jesus. The 
heavens must receive Jesus until the 
times of restitution of all things which 
tiod hath spoken by the mouth of all 
his holy prophets since the world be- 
gan. Acts 3:21. 

Now, no one knows when that shall 
be. It is common to hear or read of 
men predicting when the world shall 
come to its end. We hear or read of 
many now saying lo here, and lo there, 
But go not after them. No man knows 
when that time shall be. 

Scoffers and mockers say all things 
continue as they were from the begin- 
ning. "Where is the sign of his com- 
ing? But one day is as a thousand 
years, and a thousand years as one 
day with the Lord. 

The command of Jesus to all is 
watch. He is sure to come as he pur- 
poses. What we are to do is to watch 
as well as prey. 

Because we know not the day nor 
the hour, therefore watch. He is sure 
to come. Blessed are they that endure. 
He that endures unto the end shall be 
saved. 

Jesus left his house in order. Each 
servant has his appointed place, each 
one is to watch and serve in his place. 

There will be no new doctrine, nor 
any new dispensation, or new order, 
nor change. The house is already 
built. Wisdom has built her house, 
understanding has girded it, and 
knowledge has furnished it with all 



excellencies. We are to contend earn- 
estly for the faith once delivered to 
the saints. 

If the men set in charge begin to 
say, my Lord delayeth His coming, 
and begin to beat the men servants 
and maid servants, and to eat and to 
drink .villi the drunken, the Lord will 
come suddenly as a thief when they 
think not, and shall cast them into 



Th 



ill 



lamps, a, ul when the bridegroom conies 
they shall go in and sup with him. 

The porter shall watch. Every one 
that loves the order of the true church 
or house of God shall not desire any 

That is one mark of a lover of the' 
true church of God. But shall any 
desire new things or changes? Yes, 
many shall say, lo here, lo there. But . 
Jesus says go not after them. He that 
endures unto the end shall be saved. 
Nothing- is to he added to that which 
is perfect, nor is anything to be taken 
from ii. The man of Clod is perfect 
as he abides in Jesus. 

But wickedness shall rise up, the 
man of sin who claims the right to 
change things, or add to or to take 
away from, shall surely rise up. That 
day shall not come until there come 
a falling away, and the man of sin, 
the son of perdition be revealed. 

This false worship is( declared in 
the book called Revelation, as well 
as elsewhere, and shall be manifest- 
ed. The scriptures warn us of these 
changes and inroads and new things, 
?.nd departures, these cunning works 
of Satan and seducers' who if »pos- 



iild 



: till 



All 



elect, 
■e not written in 
the Land, slain 



shall worship Jthe dragon and the 
beast, Rev. 13:8. This ■ monster of 
iniquity lias power over all that dwell 
on the earth except those whose names 



ZTON'S LANDMARK. 



were written in the book of life from ished," he gave up the ghost. This 
he 



the foundation of the world. 

It ir. often charged against the 
Primitive Baptists that they reject 
what is not authorized in the scrip- 
tures, but that is their strength. Jesus 
Christ, the same yesterday, today and 
forever, is what they hold and love. 
They do not want anything better 
than this. 

Their enemies try to call them off 
from this to allure them, to decoy 
them, but they contend earnestly for 
the faith once delivered to the saints. 
Our (Jod is unchangeable and so is 
his doctrine, and the order of his 
house. and 

We are to hold fast that which the stien; 
Lord gives us that no man take our Ele tli 
reward. 

It is the good fight of faith or con- 
fidence in God, and he that endures 
unto the end sjhall be saved. 

P. D. G. 



add say when it was finished ; 
and then he rested in peace, and all 
that are led to trust in him. cease 
from their own work, and rejoice in 
the perfect work of Him who gave 
himself a ransom for many. 

This is the most glorious work ever 
finished. Jesus suffered no more. He 
dies no more. These things he eai 
to suffer had an end in his percct obe- 
dience, lie put away sin by the sac- 
rifice of himself| He made an end of 
sin and abolished death. 

He hath made all things new in the 
sea of redemption. Faith sees this 
and feeds upon it, and gathers 
race, and the conflict, 
unto the end, looking 
unto Jesus, the author 1 and the finish- 
er of cur faith, shall be saved. 

P. D. G. 



HOW SHALL I KNOW. 



END. 

Jesus said the things concerning 
me have an end. It was not that Je- 
sus had an end. He is the first and 
the last, the same yesterday, today 
and forever. He is without beginning 
of days, or end of time. Hence when 
Jesus said the things concerning me 
have an end it related to the things 
occurring, the things he was suffer- 
ing, the things he was performing 
would have an end, or be finished, and 
the end attained. What Jesus did 
was perfect and he finished what he 
came to do, nor could anything be 
added to or taken from what he had 
done. Hence the things concerning 
him had an end. 

The third day he was perfected. On 
the third day his work was finished, 
for he was raised from the dead on 
the third day, and ascended to glory 
on the right hand of God. When Je- 
sus, with a loud cry, said, "It is fin- 



" Whereby shall I know that I shall 
inherit this land. (Gen. 15:8. Abra- 
ham had no heir born unto him. Sarah 
was barren and past the age of child- 
bearing, even if she had not been bar- 
ren. God had not given him even so 
much as to put his foot on as a home. 
Was it wrong for him to seek a sign 
or proof that he should inherit that 
land! Was not faith sufficient. But 
faith without works is dead, being 
alone. But does not faith produce 
works? It is not true that works 
will produce faith, for the works 
are the creature and not the 
author, or creator. Faith without 
works is dead. That is true faith will 
always produce works, or cause their 
production. 

Abraham desired proof that would 
cause him to know he would inherit 
that land, or that his seed should in- 
herit it. To see that which is invisi- 
, hie to natural sight proves that things 
which be not are the same as if they 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



are, or faith is the evidence of things 
not seen. Then this faith must have 
an author altogether greater than any 
creature to account tilings that be 
not as though they were. 

When God told Abraham his seed 
then not existing should sojourn in a 
strange land four hundred years and 
shall be evil entreated but that God 
would judge that oppressing people, 
and deliver Abraham's offspring, the 
word of God caused the assurance in 
Abraham that his would occur, or he 
was seeing things that had not yet 
occurred, but that would occur, and 
that caused Abraham to know that 
what God said is true. This faith 
does not rest in the 'power of man, 
but it is y'a persuasion in the heart 
that controls the life and conduct of 
Abraham, or the man thus persuaded. 
Then this faith never fails, or is not 
disappointed. It does not depend on 
man, or creature performances, nor is 
it of the world. Jesus is the author 
and finisher of this faith. Hence the 
children of God are kept by the power 
of God through faith unto salvation 
which is ready to be revealed in the 
last times. 

This faith is holy because God is 
holy, nor is it of the nature of things 
that are made, or that do appear which 
shall perish ; but this faith is of that 
higher order than things that are of 
flesh and blood or the creature man 
can see, handle or consider which are 
to perish with the using. He that 
walks by this faith does not sin, nor 
can he be disappointed, nor fail, but 
the things he believes shall most 
surely come to pass, as God has said. 
The possessor, therefore, of this life 
is kept in perfect peace in Christ Je- 
sus. What a blessed faith to die in. 

P. D. G. 



TAKE YE AWAY THE STONE. 
Brother T. H. Travis requests my 



view of John 11:39, 'Jesus said, Take 
ye away the stone." 

When they took away the stone it 
was clear to all beholders that Laza- 
rus was dead. The enemies could not 
say he was not dead. 

Jesus did not command them to 
take away the stone in order to aid 
-Jesus at all. But when the stone that 
covered the dead man was removed 
it was clear to all that Lazarus was 
dead. 

There are many people that deny 
that the sinner is dead in trespasses 
and sins. They contend that if the 
sinner will do his part then the Lord 
will help him. They say, the sinner 
must make the first step, must do 
something, must pray, or make a start. 
Hut when the atone is taken away 
then what appears — a dead man, one 
i lead in trespasses and in sins. When 
you know that one is dead what do 
you tell him to do If you are honest 
you know he is not able to do a thing, 
not move, pray, or breathe, or do any- 
thing. 

If one is dead in trespasses and sins 
is he any more able to quicken him- 
self from the dead, or move, or hun- 
ger, or thirst after righteousness, or 
pray than a man literally or naturally 
dead is aide to move, or do anything 
at all? 

The stone is a type of the law which 
was written on tables of stone, the 
covenant of works, the ministration 
of death, represented by the grave, 
and the stone that lay upon it. 

The preaching of the servants of 
God set forth the condition of the sin- 
ner dead in sin, and that Jesus Christ 
raises the dead, and that no man can 
aid him at all in this work. 

Men that exalt the creature, or that 
think they do by preaching the power 
of the creature, claim that as Jesus 
told those standing by to take away 
the stone that means there is a work 
for the dead sinner to do, or there is; 



Z ION'S LANDMARK. 



137 



a work to be done for him by those 
standing by, and hence theTe is a 
work now for man to do in order to 
raise the dead. But they never can 
tell what it is that man can do and 
must do. 

When those that stood by removed 
the stone did that help Jesus in rais- 
ing the dead man? Was it done for 
that purpose? No. But when Laza- 
rus lay uncovered in the jaws of death 
none could deny that he was dead. 
Nor could any one present say that 
he had done anything to raise Laza- 
rus, nor that rolling away the stone 
was to help in his resurrection. 

An honest confession that man is 
dead in trespasses and in sins in na- 
ture, and that God who is rich in mercy 
has quickened us together with Christ, 
ascribing salvation to be by the grace 
of God, does honor or gives glory to 
the Lord where it belongs. 

P. D. G. 



'duaries. 



Morehead City, N. C, Jan. 25, 1915. 

Dear Brother Gold : 1 am sending 
the obituary of my mother. You re- 
member you read it last summer, and 
I promised to send a copy for the 
Landmark. She has been dead for 
some time, but her influence is still 
felt and her children and grand-chil- 
dren rise up and call her blessed. 

MRS. GILBERT ARTHUR. 

SIDNEY MASON. 

On last Thursday evening, between 
ten and eleven o'clock there escaped 
its prison-house of clay into the eter- 
nal presence of God's love, the weary 
soul of a saint-like woman. 

June 20, 1824, Mrs. Sidney Mason 
was born; June 19, 1846, she was 
wedded to Manaen W. Mason, becom- 



ing in time the mother of twelve chil- 
dren, and Juue 23, l'JU'J, she died, hav- 
ing lived a few days more than eighty 
five years. 

Truly, her life was one of service, 
loving kindness and above all else, "a 
life of faith in her Master. In her 
strong young womanhood, no one did 
her duty more bravely and cheerfully 
than she, towaid making the lives of 
those with whom she came in touch 
better and brighter; and in the even- 
tide of her life one always felt the 
responsibilities of living less heavy, 
and God a little nearer for having 
listened to her peaceful talk, as she 
sat with folded hands, awaiting the 
time when she should go home, glad 
that it was not far distant. 

Through the many sorrows and 
trials which the Master saw fit that 
she should pass, she at last stood 
forth, not with faith weakened, and 
eyes seeing Him as through a mist, 
but even as gold is refined by fire, 
with a love deepening forever more 
brightly glowing than ever before. 

Knowing that she was such a wom- 
an as this, it is not hard to under- 
stand how much she loved the dear 
old hymn, which begins: 
''How firm a foundation, ye saints of 

the Lord ; 
Is laid for your faith in his excellent, 
word." 

Let us not be too sad for a life thus 
lived, and now ended, but rather 
strive that we may be as sure at the 
end of the Lord's "Welldone, thou 
good and faithful servant." 

Her grand-daughter. L. E. A. 



MRS. EVELINE TREVATHAN. 

It has become my sad duty to try 
to write the death of my dear aunt. 
I feel incompetent to do justice to 
her, but will do the best I can. 

Aunt Ebb, as she was called by all 
who knew her, was the daughter of 



138 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



William and Exeline Lucas. She was 
born April 27th, 1848, and died Octo- 
ber 21,1913. She was married to Jesus 
Trevathan, date unknown to the 
writer, with whom she lived until the 
Lord saw fit to take him from her. 
She was very industrious and a faith- 
ful wife, always doing her part in 
every sphere of life. 

She joined the Primitive Baptist 
church at Lower Black Creek, July 
L4, 1878, and was baptized by Elder 
A. J. Moore. Aunt Eb. was a very 
useful member always filling her seat, 
many times when she did not look 
able to be there. When asked how 
she was the answer would be, "I am 
as well as anybody." She was one 
of the sweet singers in Israel, for 
years we were at a loss to sing with- 
out her, but in her declining years 
she did not sing as her mind was im- 
paired, for she had been partially par- 
alyzed, several years before she died. 
Aunt Eb. was like all of us. She had 
her faults, but was ever ready to con- 
fess them. She was thoughtful of her 
pastor. Many times has the writer 
seen her come to church with a 
lunch in her hand for her pas- 
tor, saying it was too much for 
him to go home without eating. As 
long as her health would permit her 
home was always open for her breth- 
ren and sisters, and many visited her 
as everyone loved to go to see Aunt 
Eb. She was cheerful and kind and 
when no longer able to go she was 
patient, never murmuring at her stay 
nor wishing her suffering less, saying, 
"It was alright. I am just waiting 
the Lord's time." She was tenderly 
eared for in her last days by her 
husband's niece. Geneva, and her hus- 
band, John Skinner. They did all for 
her that could be done, never tiring 
day nor night and surely they will be 
rewarded. I feel that their conscience 
is clear and that should be a great con- 
solation. She passed away gently as 



one going to sleep, without a struggle, 
and was laid to rest beside her hus- 
band the following day, to await the 
resurrection morn. 
Safe in the hands whom seas obey, 

When swelling surges rise, 
lie turns the darkest night to day, 

And brightens lowering skies ; 

Then upward loves howe'er distress- 
ing, 

Jesus wdl guide thee home 
To that eternal park of rest 

Where storms shall never come. 
Written by her niece 

'(MRS.) W. J. KAl'EK. 



MARY E. KEENE. 

Mrs. Mary E. Keene died at her 
home near Four Oaks, January 5, 
1915. She was 58 years, two months 
and 26 days old, and was united in 
marriage to John C. Keene April 8, 
1877. To this union were born ten 
children, nine of whom are living. She 
had been in poor health for the past 
few years, but was confined to her 
bed only three months before her 
death. She bore her sufferings with 
remarkable patience owing to such a 
strong constitution. All that loving 
relatives, friends and kind physicians 
could do could not stay the hand of 
death. She possessed a beautiful 
Christian character, having united 
with the Primitive Baptist church at 
Four Oaks several years ago, and was 
a dutiful member as long as her health 
would permit. She was a generous 
hearted woman, a devoted wife and 
affectionate mother. 

Oh the tender love of mother! 
What with it can Ave compare? 
Always careful, always hopeful. 
Helping us our burdens bear. 

By her loving and pleasing disposi- 
tion she made friends wherever she 
went. To know her was to love her. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



139 



Her presence will be greatly missed, 
yet we have a bright hope that she is 
sweetly resting in the arms of Jesus 
in that city not made with hands. She 
has left beside her husband and chil- 
dren a number of grandchildren, two 
sisters and two brothers to mourn 
their loss. She was laid to rest on the 
following day after her death at the 
family burying ground amidst a 
crowd of sorrowing relatives and 
friends. 

Sleep on, dear mother, and take your 
rest ; 

(iod lias called now, He knows best. 
Written by a daughter, ELLA. 



WILLIAM FORSHEE (Col.) 

By reque r t of a de&f sister, 1 will 
try to write in memory of her dear 
husband, William Forshee. But, 
Oh, how weak and incompetent 1 feel 
to begin the task. 

For to me he seemed so good and 
lovely 1 feel that 1 can't find words 
to do Jinn justice. Mr. Forshee depart- 
ed this life May 10th, 19*4. He was 
about 70 years old, was married twice 
first to i\liss Laura Hester. This un- 
ion being blessed with five children, 
three dying in infancy, two girls liv- 
ing to be grown women and have fam- 
ilies. 

Forshee also leaves fifteen grand- 
children and two great grandchildren. 
He w s deftfted to them all, and in 
return was loved p.nd honored by 
them. The fall of 1911 his companion 
whom he dearly loved was taken away 
from him, leaving him a sad and lone- 
ly widower. Then he was married to 
Mrs. Lina Wcllfi. Both of his wives 
belonged to the Primitive Baptist 
church at White Oak Grove, in Or- 
ange county. Win. Forshee was not a 
toe'niber of the church. Bui believed 
in the Primitive Baptist doctrine, and 
would go to hear the good Primitive 
Baplisls preach as long as he was 



able to go. He lived a moral life, to 
his wife a kind and loving husband, 
and to his children and grandchildren 
a kind and affectionate father, and to 
his neighbors lie was kind and hos- 
pitable and honest in all his dealings 
with men. Truly, it can be said of 
him that to know him was to love 
him. lie had been in feeble health 
for some time with that dreadful dis- 
ease cancer of the liver. All was done 
for him that could be done by kindred, 
friends and a loving wife and two 
doctors. But none could stay the cold 
hand of death. He bore his suffering 
with much patience, never murmur- 
ing. He was humble and kind all 
through his sickness and sl-emed to 
be so thankful for all that was done 
for him. During his sickness he seem- 
ed to lie glad when his friends visit- 
ed him. He would ask them to sing 
and talk. Win. Forshee was a gifted 
singer and would sing the Baptist 
songs. He had a pretty voice. His 
favorite song was: 
"My soul doth magnify the Lord; 
My spirit doth rejoice in (iod. my 
Savior and my God. 
As on the cross the avior hung, and 
wept and bled and died. 
He poured salvation on a wretch 

that languished at his side." 
He told me of a dream he had. He 
said he saw himself standing over a 
place of torment on a little narrow 
strip of iron. Said he had on shoes 
with the thickest soles on them, and 
the flames in that place of torment 
burnt that iron that he. was standing 
on in two, and burnt the thick soles on 
his shoes in two, and even so much as 
scorched his feet. Then he said he was 
made to think of Daniel being cast 
into the lion's den, and the Lord was 
with him, and the lion didn't hurt 
him. Then he said he was made to 
think about the three Hebrew children 
being cast into the fiery furnace, and 
the Lord was with them, and they 



140 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



were not hurt. He said then he be- 
eame real happy and said, Oh! if lie 
only could feel that happy when his 
friends would be standing around his 
bed when death came he felt that the 
Lord would be with him, and be would 
be wili ng to go. He told me one 
night while L was at bis home singing 
before he was taken sick. We were 
singing "Come, bumble sinner, in 
whose breasl a thousand thoughts re- 
volve. Come with your guilt and 
fear oppressed, and make this last re- 
solve, and when we got the the sixth 
verse, 1 can but perish of 1 go; I'm 
resolved to try. For if 1 stay away I 
know 1 must forever die, he spoke 
and said that was his feeling about 
offering to the church. He also spoke 
of the new heaven that John spoke of 
in Revelation, twenty-first chapter 
and first verse. He said he believed 
when the Lord pardoned his sin that 
was thefirst heaven. It was a heaven 
below, my Redeemr to know, and sec- 
ond was going down in the watery 
grave. He spoke of hearing the pret- 

dream. dust before he died he told 
his grand sons that were standing 
around his bed for them to carry out 
the crop in the way they had started 

te'lling his friends they all had to come 
down on their dying bed 'as he was 
and raising hands he bid them all fare- 
well and passed gently away from this 
world of sorrow to a better world 
above. He was followed to his last 
resting place at Golly, their family 
burving place, bv a large crowd of 
sorrowing friends. He leaves a sor- 
rowing wife and nine grandchildren 
and two great grandchildren to mourn 
their loss. Weep not. dear wife, as one 
without hope, for 1 believe your loss 
is bis eternal gain. 

Written bv his friend and a sister, 
I hope NORA CORDON, col. 



ISAIAH G. LEWIS. 

Dear Brother Cold: 

It is with a sad heart 1 will try to 
write the death of my dear cousin, 
Isaiah Cold Lewis. I fear I can not 
do him justice, but if it is the Lord's 
will 1 will do the best I can as his 
mother requested me to write his obit- 
uary for the Landmark. Isaiah was 
the son of J. W. and Eliza Lewis. He 
was born February 8, 1895, and died 
September 20, 1914, making his stay 
on earth nineteen years, 7 months and 
12 days. He died with the dreadful 
disease typhoid fever. He was sick 
six w r eeks, lacking one day. All was 
done for him that a good doctor, 
trained nurse, loving wife, mother, 
father and kind friend;-: and relatives 
could do ; but none could stay th-3 
cold, icy hand of death. He leaves a 
good wife, mother, father and five 
brothers and sisters, a grand mother 
and a host of relatives and friends 
to mourn their loss. He was married 
to Miss Mattie Pickrel June 22, 1913, 
and they lived happily together until 
his death. They lived at his father \ 
a few months after they wit: married, 
near Gretna, Va. He was in very 
bad health when they moved to Char- 
lottesville, Va., to see if he would get 
better. He got better and they thought 
he was getting on all right, until he 
was taken down with the typhoid fe- 
ver, and kept getting worse until his 
death. 1 have heard him say many 
times that be didn't think he could 
live long, that he was in such bad 
health that he couldn't enjoy himself 
much anywhere. He was a good boy, 
and was not a member of any church, 
but a strong believer in the Primitive 
Baptist church. He prayed the Lord 
to have mercy on him all the time he 
was sick, and' told his wife the day he 
died that lie wanted to be baptized. 
She believed he was changed on his 
death bed. He talked a lot about 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



141 



wanting to go home while he was on 
his death bed. He told hia wife to 
have him buried at his father's, at the 
old 1'auniy burying ground, near Gret- 
na, Va. ISo they laid his body to rest 
at his father's on Monday after the 
third Sunday in September. It is hard 
to give up our loved one. 

S I' >«U id U I; • I J 

We sball sleep, but not forever, 
In the lone and silent grave; 

Blessed be the Lord that taketh, 
Blessed be the Lord that gave. 

In that bright eternal city 

Death can never, never come. 

In bis own good time He'll call us 
From our toil to Home, sweet Home. 

A precious one from us is gone, 

A voice we loved is still, 
A place is vacant in our home, 

Which can never be filled. 

LUE ELLA DOSS. 

Witt, Va. 



JAMES A. EVANS. 

Tli is brother was born in Martin 
eounty, North Carolina. July 15, 1846. 
lie was baptized by Elder Beneett Pitt 
the second Sunday in June, 1840, at 
Lower Town Creek. In his latter days 
on earth he was a member at Tarboro, 
N. C. About 28 years ago he was at- 
tacked with white swelling, from 
which he suffered while he remained 
on earth. The pain, and raging increas- 
ed until he became helpless-. The 
noted trait of this dear brother's char- 
acter was his patience. He endured 
ns seeing him who is i nvisible. He 
was so gentle, quiet, unmurmuring 
that it gathered his brethren near to 
him, for he was much beloved. He was 
gifted in the experience that grows 
out of tribulation. He was firmly 
fixed in what lie believed What to 
him was not of faith was sin. He was 
a living epislle known and read by 



them who saw him, and lived his re- 
ligion, showing the gracious power of 
Jesus wrought in him, and so embla- 
zoned that his light did so shine that 
men could see its blessed indwelling 
and glorify God his heavenly Father. 

While he desired to wait patiently 
his appointment of departure, yet he 
was hoping, looking for and waiting 
for that blessed time to come. 

While he was of an industrious mind 
and did not want to be a burden to 
others, but would have been glad to 
serve others, yet his lot for years was 
to be helpless. 

The Lord blessed him with a loving, 
industrious wife that was able and did 
wait on him and gently nurse him to 
the last, which she so sweetly did, aud 
now she mourns his loss, but not as 
those who have no hope for him or for 
herself; for in God's time she also shall 
depart and be with Christ, which is 
far better. 

He fell asleep in Jesus on the 7th 
of January at his home in Tarboro, N. 
C. Embalmed in the memory of his 
brethren, he rests in sleep, but greater 
than that his spirit is with Jesus in 
Paradise. 

Two sons survive him to be a com 
fort, we hope, to their mother and to 
cherish the memory of their father who 
is no mor on earth. P. D. GOLD. 



ELDEli J. D. YASS, OF VIRGINIA 

Wilmington) — Saturday and third 
Sunday in February. 
Tuesday — Yopps. 
Wednesday — Bay. 
Thursday— Ward 's Will. 
Friday — Northeast. 
Saturday — Hadnot's Creek. 
Fourth Sunday — White Oak. 
Southwest — Tuesday after. 
Maple Hill — Wednesday. 
Cypress Creek — Thursday. 
Muddy Creek' — Friday. 
Goldsboro — Saturday night. 



14-2 



ZION'S LANDMARK, 



Memorial — First Sunday in Mai eh. 

Lower Black Creek — Monday. 

Wilson — Tuesday night. 

Upper Town Creek — Wed. 

Pleasant Hill — Thursday. 

Mill Branch— Friday. 

Falls — Saturday and second Sunday. 

Nashville — Monday. 

Peachtree Tuesday. 

Sandy Grove — Wednesday. 

Healthy Plains — Thursday. 

Contentnea— Friday. 

Scott 's — Saturday. 

Upper Black Creek — Third Sunday. 

Beulah — Monday. 

Creeches— Tuesday. 

Salem— Wednesday. 

Clayton -At night. 

Winston-Salem— Thursday night. 

E. E. LUNDY. 



ELDER J. P. TINGLE. 

Lower Black Creek — Saturday and 
1st Sunday in Feb. 

Wilson— Monday night. 
Contentnea— Tuesday. 
Scott's— Wednesday. 
Upper Black Creek— Thursday. 
Aycock's— Friday. 

Memorial — Saturday and first Sun- 
day in February. 

Goldsboro — Sunday night. 



ELDER W. R. CRAFT. 

Smithfield— Saturday and fn-ss Sun- 
day. 

Clement -Mo i' 1 ay. . * 
Four Oaks- -T i-sdry. 
Hannah's Creek — Wednesday. 
Benson — Thursday. 
Bethsaida — Friday. 
Coats — Saturday. 
Angier — Second Sunday. 
Sandy Grove — Monday. 
Fellowship — Tuesday. 
Willow Spring— Wednesday. 
Middle Creek— Thursday. 
Raleigh — Thursday night. 



Durham — Friday night. 
Burlington — Saturday night. 
High Point — 3rd Sunday 
Lexington — MonJi.y. 
Pine- —Tuesday. 
Salisbury — Wednesday. 
Abbott's Creek — Thursday. 
Saints Delight — Friday. 
Winston-Salemi — Saturday and 4th 
Sunday. 



ELDER J. C. HOOKS. 

Goldsboro — Thursday night, Feb. 
L8. 

LaGrange — Friday. 
Winston — Saturday. 
Newport — Third Sunday. 
Morehead City— Monday night. 
Mirshailburg— Tuesday. 
Hunting Quarter — Wednesday. 
Cedar Island— Thursday. 
Brethren can arrange time of day 



Elder J. T. Collier's address is 
changes from Kenly, N. C, R. F. D. to 
Micro, N. C. 



SIGN YOUR NAME HERE. 

If you suffer with any chronic dis- 
ease that does not seem to be benefit- 
ed by drugs, such as dyspepsia, indi- 
gestion, sick headache, neuralgia, 
rheumatism, gall stones, liver or kid- 
ney diseases, or any other chronic ail- 
ment involving impure blood, you aro 
cordially invited to accept the liberal 
offer made below. It is a grave mis- 
take to assume that your case is in- 
curable simply because remedies pre- 
pared by human skill have not seem- 
ed to benefit you. Put your faith in 
nature, accept this offer and you will 
never have cause to regret it. 

I believe this is the most wonderful 
Mineral Spring that has ever been 
discovered, for its waters have either 
restored or benefited nearly everyone 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



143 



who nas accepted my offer. Match 
your faith in this Spring against my 
pocketbook and if the water does not 
relieve your case I will make no 
charge for it. Clip this notice, sign 
your name, enclose the amount and 
let this wonderful water begin its 
healing work in you us it has in thou- 
sands of others. 
Shivar Springs, 

Box 55-A, Shelton, S. C. 
Gentlemen : 

I accept your guarantee offer and 
enclose herewith two dollars for ten 
gallons of Shivar Mineral Water. 1 
agree to give it a fair trial, in accord- 
ance with instructions contained in 
booklet you will send, and if it fails 
to benefit my case you agree to re- 
fund the price in full upon receipt of 
the two empty demijohns which I 
agree to return promptly. 

Name 

Address 

Shipping Point 

(Please write distinctly.) 

Note: — The advertising manager of 
Zion's Landmark is personally ac- 
quainted with Mr. Shivar. You run 
no risk whatever in accepting his of- 
f r. I have personally witnessed the 
remarkable curr.tive pov/er of this 
Water in a very serious case. 

Cancer Cured at the Kellam Hospital. 

The record of the Kel'am Hospital 
is without parallel in history, having 
cured without the uue of the Knife, 
Acids, X-Ray or Radium, over ninety 
per cent, of the many hundreds of 
sufferers from Cancer which it has 
treated during the past eighteen 
years. We want every man and wom- 
an in the United States to know wha't 
we are doing. KELLAM HOSPITAL, 
1617 W. Main St., Richmond, Va. 
Write for literature. 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Nerves. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

COXNERSVILLE, 1ND., 

R. No. 1, Box 6., 

Agents Wanted. 



has kii 
tions ( 
desirin 
subs 



Whitmei 
send in s 



hi 



nptton ci 
A receipt card will be maik 
direct for amount paid. 

P. D. 6. 



An Only Daughter 

Relieved of Consumption 

When death was hourly expected, all remedies 
having failed, aud l»r. II. James was experiment- 
ing with the many herbs of Calcutta, he acci- 

He has proved 



stamps to pay expenses. This herb also 
cures Night Sweats. N.!um-:> at the .- tomach and 
will break up a f.e-h col, I in twentv-four hours 
Address Craddock & Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa„ naming this paper. 



REQUEST. 



We are in need of money to pay ex- 
penses. "While war is raging in the 
East we need money as much as if 
there were no war. We can help each 
other by paying debts. Please send 
on what is due on the Landmark, and 
let each one pay his debts, as far as 
possible, and this will help to relieve 
the distress. 

P. D. G. 



lead us your Job Printing. 



1 1 1 



Z ION'S LANDMARK. 




FOR INFORMATION. 



For information and for reference 
we would be pleased to have a Minute 
of every Primitive Baptist Association 
in America and will thank the Clerks 
of the various Associations to forward 
one to me at their earliest possible 
convenience. 



Cured His 
Rupture 



Confederate Veteran Used the Brooks 
Rupture Appliance and Cured 
Himself at Home. 




6 lb. pair Pillows to ma'ch for 31.00 

All »-w. ft tin i »i> <■ ii . | l< •........« Amo«k^«^leklgg. 

SANITflVY "BEDDING COmVanV/ Oept" 346 Charlotte. N. C. 

MOORE'S MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Last summer my health became 
very poor. I went to Moore's Miner- 
al Springs, in Stokes County, N. C, 
remaining thete about 12 days, I re- 
turned home well. 

This water acts on the blood, the 
skin, the bowels, kidneys, stomach, 
catarrh, &c. 

I gladly recommend this water to 
the sick. Hotel open winter and sum- 
mer. Wate'r shipped from Rural Hall, 
N. C, at $1.50 per case of 12 half gal- 
lons and cases to be returned in 30 
days. 

P. D. GOLD. 



Send us your Job Printing. 



tr. Bniiks writes— "I am sound and so 
II that I con plow or do any kind of 
ivy work. I can truly say your Appli- 
ce has effect* <1 0 I" niKinent euro. I 
s in a terrible condition and had 
■ii up hope of ever b-iuy: any better. 



; ;ln't Irn 

i-ould never hav< 
ears old and s( 
Sckle'S Artillery 
lope God will re\ 
ou are doinpt to s 
Brooks' Applian 
lflc invention, th 
bat makes life 1 



for your Appliam 
i got well. I am 
rvi'd three years 
df Oclethorpe Co. 



-1 parts. Has autoi 



. i'0-.-.JB htulo St., Mar., Hull, 



LADIES S 1 000 REWARD! LS« y SS5 

Succ>».ftil "MonllilV V !>..uii.l. S.n. i y relieves s.mu- 

..f II... : 1 . I I. , M.rnnl c»«-s in 3 toft 

d:os. N,, I, ,„■„,, ,,.„., .ii" r I. r. t ^ illi w..rk. ^ M:.'l 

Dr. J. R. Soufhinglon Remedy Co., 515 Main St. Kansas City, Mo. 



.elief, soon 
nd short breath often gives entire relief , 
1 15 to 25.la.ys. Trialtreatmentsentfree 

DR THOMAS E.GREEN, Successor to 
R. H. H. GREENS SONS, Box H, Chatsworth, Ga. 



ZIO^Sl LANDMARK 

PUBLISHEED SEMI-MONTHLY 
AT 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Primitive or Old School Baptist 

VOL. XLVIII. WILSON, N. O, FEB. 15, 1915. NUMBER 7. 




P. D. GOLD, Editor 


Wilson, N. 6. 


P. G. LESTER, Asso. Editor 


Floyd, Va. 



$1.50 PER YEAR. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 



"Ask. for the eld paths where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the 
ancient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, sad 
strengthened by its eords of lore. 

It hopes to rejeet all traditions and institutions of men, 
and regard only the Bible as the standard of train. 

It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey 
desus, the King in the Holy Hill of Son, keeping them- 
selves unspotted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the 
blessed Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postoffiees. When ems 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what Is due, and atee 
state his postoffiee. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if pos- 
sible, and when he renews give the same name H has been 
going in, unless he wishes it changed, then he should scats 
both the old and the new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted, please inform 
me of it. When you can always send money by money order 
or cheek, or draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers ef gospel truth are invited to write for it — if 
so impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers 
of truth. 

All communications, business letters, remittances ef P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 



P. 9. SOLD, WBsen, H. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSS OF JESUS CHRIST. 



A NATIONAL FAST, 1779. 

Lord, hear a guilty nation mourn, 
Nor let Thy dreadful anger burn; 
We own and we lament our crimes, 
And see the signs of threat 'ning times. 

We tremble at Thine awful hand 
Stretch 'd out against our sinful land: 
At home, abroad, in distant climes, 
We see the signs of dreadful times. 

We feel at home, and hear from far, 
Alarming sounds of thund'ring war; 
The guilt of our enormous crimes 
Brings on the signs of bloody times. 

What sins, what horrid sins abound, 
While earthquakes dire convulse the 
ground ! 

Shall we not these Thy judgments 
fear, 

When signs ot such dark times ap- 
pear? 

How is religion folly deem'd, 
And Thy most holy name blasphem'd! 
While numbers strive who most shall 
do, 

The signs of harden 'd times to show. 

Surely such awful times declare 
The day of judgment must be near; 
When sinners, in astonish 'd crowds, 
Shall see Christ coming in the clouds. 

Prepare us, Lord, for that great day; 



Forgive, and take our sins away; 
Then shall we see, without a fear, 
The ' ' coming of the Lord ' ' draws near. 

Our king, the State, and councils bless, 
Crown fleets and armies with success, 
Crush the perfidious, haughty foe, 
And signs and times of vict'ry show. 

Lord, our dear native country spare ; 
Attend our cry, and hear our prayer j 
And yet, His mercy, let us see 
The signs of better times from Thee. 

SAMUEL MEDLEY. 



THE NEW YEAR. 

Dear Brother Gold:— With the be- 
ginning of the year I am reminded my 
subscription is due for the Landmark, 
which you will find enclosed. I also 
feel impressed to address a few lines 
to God's little ones, notwithstanding 
a firm resolve to refrain from this, and 
leave it at your disposal. 

The New Year has dawned upon us 
and with it brings great gloom, and 
sorrow from the horrors and devasta- 
tion of war across the sens. How cruel 
;ind indescribable the sufferings of the 
millions of beings engaged, and in 
close contact with Ibis struggle. In- 
deed it is sad and lamentable, yet we 
know God reigns above all other pow- 
ers. 

In this thought my heart gotm out 



146 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



in love to the household of faith, those 
who are needy and destitute and 
longing for God's mercy and grace to 
sustain and keep them in the right 
way, and bring them to "The fountain 
of living waters," which is the Lord. 

My greetings of love this New Year 
is "On earth peace, good will toward 
men." 

It is said "The pen is mightier than 
the sword." True, indeed, if wield- 
ed in love and duty which spirit I hope 
prompts this message. 

1 would encourage "you who are 
troubled rest with us," remember the 
rich 'promises of God. He is the same 
yesterday, today and forever, is not 
slack concerning his Avord. 

Let our lives honor and glorify Him 
who is kind and so merciful to our 
unrighteousness. May each of us be 
found in duty, obeying the commands 
of the Lord, and trust Him for his 
grace. 

Think, dear ones. He has promised 
to make "crooked places straight," to 
"give the treasures of darkness," and 
"hidden riches of secret places/' 
even to subdue nations, "loose the 
loins of kings," open the "two leaved 
gates," "break in pieces the gates of 
brass." "cut in sunder the bars of 
iron." 

The enemy has no stronghold that 
can withstand the mighty power of 
God, because he is the God of his an- 
ointed. "There is no God else beside 
me, a just God and a Saviour." These 
assurances are a challenge in obed- 
ience. He says, "I form the light and 
create darkness, I make peace and 
create evil." 

The creature is accountable to God 
for transgressions and neglecting the 
things which will bear fruit unto 
righteousness. Light and knowledge 
is an inheritance of the spiritual king- 
dom, and the Lord has promised good 
to them that walk uprightly. The 
command is to shun even the appear- 



ance of evil. AVho then can charge 
God with our wrong doing? 

The apostle "wept bitterly," we are 
told in denying the Saviour, and at 
another time for his unbelief "he fell 
down at Jesus' knees," saying, "De- 
part from me ; for 1 am a sinful man 

0 Lord." 

Blessings and joys follow obedience, 
not because at all of our merit. God 
so fixed it because of love, and his 
•pleasure. 

If we walk in natural darkness we 
are in danger of destruction, and of 
course it is with great care we take 
even a step, when shrouded in spirit- 
ual darkness. What is better than to 
"stand still and see the salvation of 
the Lord," though it is taxing and 
burdensome to our soid. We know 
God is head over all things, and "un- 
derneath are his everlasting arms." 

"Let patience have her perfect 
work," and reap the reward promised 
those who wait on Him. When weak 
and weary, pressed beneath the weight 
of sin and sorrow, realizing our help- 
lessness, may the Lord bless us to ac- 
knowledge this, and 1 eg as one of old 
did, "0 Lord I am oppressed under- 
take for me." God';: spirit does not 
promipl his children to dwell in touts 
of wickedness, but to serve in the 
school of Christ in love an dmeekness, 
in truth and in ths fear of God. 

Wherever our lot is cast, if in ad- 
versity or prosperity, in bonds and 
afflictions of trials and crosses, or in 
the slough of despondency, let us not 
forget the all seeing eye of God is up- 
on us. When tempest tossed with 
evil temptation of unbelief and sin- 
sickness, assailed with foes within and 
without, this promise is sweet and as- 
uring, "In my Father's house are 
many mansion? 1 . Tf it were not so 

1 would h .ve told yon. I go to pre- 
pare a place for yon." When the 
Lord appears aviYi the crmforts of his 
holy Spirit, it is enough, rest and joy 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



147 



and peace is found, the fullness is com- 
plete. 

Now let us foilow him through ev'< 
as well as good report. If it is for 
well doing and in defense of the 
truth, follow where he leads, if we 
can see his foot prints, ''touch the hem 
of his garments," end feel his pres- 
ence, why need we fear, even to cross 
the river of death. 

Affectionately and unworthily, 
BBTTIB G. EVERETT. 
R. :J. Raleigh, N. C. 



COMMUNICATION 

Elder P. D. (Jold, Wilson, N. C. 

Dear Mr. Gold: 1 am sending you a 
good, comforting letter from Elder L. 
H. Hardy, which you may give a place 
in the Landmark if you please. 

Sincerely, 
ELIZABETH 11. BARBOUR. 

Benson, N. C. 
Miss Elizaheth II. Barbour, 
Benson, N. C. 

Your letter of the 5th instant came 
in due time, but 1 was from home, and 
when 1 got there was very busy for 
some days, and 1 do not feel even now, 
that 1 can say anything to comfort you. 
I feel to be a barren waste and that 
if the Lord has ever known me in His 
blessed covenant He has hid his lace 
from me for some purpose. 

When I was from home on my last 
eastern trip J was made to feel that 
I was as King Saul whom the Lord 
did not answer by dreams nor by vis- 
ions, nor by prophets, nor by Trim nor 
by Thummin. 1 felt that my case was 
very desolate and almost desperate. 

If the children of God are the desert 
spoken of in the 35th chapter of Isaiah 
then I must be one o£.that number, and 
if I am, 1 can but hope the day will 
come when there will be an opening of 
the flowers in my poor desolate heart. 
I know that the lilies grow in the cess- 
pool of the filth washed from the 



mountain side. Thus, if my heart was 
not such a barren spot it would be a 
place for the lillies to grow. Surely, 
all that is ugly and vile finds a lodg- 
ment there and 1 can see no good thing 
in it. 

What is man that thou art mindful 
of; or the son of man that thou visit- 
est him .' How wonderful is such a 
question, when we come to consider 
the great contrast between God and 
man.' Oh, the debth of such love as 
could move him to come and suffer 
shame and contempt and even death 
for such worms as we ! 

It was when He fell that He rose 
again, when fie became obedient unto 
death that He triumphed in life. When 
He appeared to gi\fe up all He conquer- 
ed the powers of darkness. Tims He 
marked out for His people the path 
of sufferings through this world, but a 
sure deliverance with Him in glory. 
He said, "In me you shall have peace; 
in the world you shall have tribula- 
tions; be not dismayed for J have over- 
come the world." We want to notice 
that it was by His decree that we shall 
have peace in Him for He said, "In me 
you shall have peace." "Shall have." 
Then it is not optional nor is it some- 
thing we work out now for and ob- 
tain. It is given in Jesus Christ, our 
Lord. The same is true on the other 
side. In the world you shall have trib- 
idations; "shall have," again. Surely 
one is as much His decree as the other. 
Then He gives us the blessd consola- 
tion that "in me you shall have peace. 
Why? .Because He had overcome the 
world for all who shall live with Him 
in glory. It was as needful for Him to 
die as it was for Him to live and live 
again. It was in His death that Ave 
died, and in His life that we live and 
shall live forevermore. We are dead 
and our life is hid with Christ in (lod. 
He had to die to live ami we live in 
Him and by Him. He gives us eter- 
nal life and that life is in His Son. If 



148 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



He is safe and beyond the reach, of 
Satan's power, we also are safe, for 
we are in Him. We are His and our 
afflictions are also His and He endured 
them and overcame the world for His 
own. Is He not able to save us from 
the aiilictions and tribulations of the 
world? He said, 'If you will live God- 
ly in Christ Jesus yon shall suffer per- 
secutions? Thereore, the persecutions 
are a part of our inheritance. Would 
we be without any part of our inheri- 
tance ? We must possess the land from 
side to side, both the hill and valleys. 

His servant haul has perils by land, 
perils by sea and perils among false 
brethren. If we serve God as Paul did 
will we not have the same? He en- 
dured persecutions and it was on the 
wings of 'persecutions that he was flur- 
ried from place to place preaching the 
word. Did he hate his persecutions:' 
No, lie loved them. What his persecu- 
tors meant for evil God meant for good 
and what God meant prevailed. 

My dear mother once wrote to me 
and quoted thus: 

The storm could not bury that word in 
the wave, 
"fwas taught through the tempest to 
fly; 

It shall reach His disciples in every 
age, 

Saying, "Be not afraid, it is I. 

Since that time these words of Mr. 
Baltzell's have appeared like a word 
from God to me. Yet there are times 
that the clouds are so thick I can not 
see anything nor receive any promise. 
1 love to see the other side of the 
cloud and Jesus standing on it, and to 
hear Him say, " 1 am He that was dead 
and am alive, and, behold, I live for- 
ever more." How sweet this word, for 
He said again, "As 1 live so shall you 
live also." Ts not that enough? What 
more can we ask for? 

The God of this salvation bless you, 
Your friend, I hope, 

L. H HARDY. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Gold : This leaves me 
very unwell and I don't believe 1 ever 
will be well again. Hope this will 
find you, your wife and family well. 

1 am enclosing my daughter's expe- 
rience, which I hope you will publish. 
1 believe she has a bright hope in 
Christ and the publication of her expe- 
rience would be a comfort to me in 
my affliction. 

May you continue to publish the 
Landmark for 1 dearly love the doc- 
trine it advocates. It's all that is any 
comfort to me, a poor sinner, justly 
condemned. May the good Lord bless 
you and yours in your latter days is 
my desire. 

Your brother, I hope, 

J. K. P. LESTER. 

Uo'peville, Ga. 

Deai' Father: I am impressed to 
write you my experience which I hope 
is the dealings of the Lord with me. 

As far back as I remember I felt to 
lie a sinner. When just a child 1 was 
afraid to go to sleep for fear 1 would 
die and torment would be my doom, 1 
was in so much trouble. 

One night I heard the prettiest music 
I had ever heard and I wasn't asleep. 
I sat up in bed but didn't know what 
it meant, Afterwards my troubles left 
me for awhile, but when I got sick 1 
thought 1 was going to die. I tried to 
pray but all I could say was, "'Lord 
have mercy on me, a poor sinner." J 
went to my dear mother's grave and 
there I shed bitter tears. I thought why 
did the Lord take her and leave me. 

I went on in this way until Pearce 
was born and afterwards when I was 
shocked by lightning I knew there was 
no hope for me — that the Lord was go- 
ing to strike me dead. I then thought 
of going to you, but the thought came 
to n.e, ho can't save you, you must b« 
saved by a higher power. I thought 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



149 



anyhow 1 would go and maybe I would 
feel better. 

1 dreaded to see the sun rise as 1 did 
not expect to see it set. and was afraid 
to be left alone for fear 1 would die. 
I dreamed one night that Pearce and I 
were in a very muddy river turning over 
and over and that there was no help 
for us, but we landed on a solid rock. I 
felt like praising the Lord, but my joy 
tarried to sorrow when, sometime after 
this, 1 dreamed the world came to an 
end. Fire was everywhere and I 
thought my time had come when 1 
heard a voice saying, "Fear not, thou 
wilt be saved," and 1 awoke r«]oie 

1 had a desirw to join the church 
when the thought came to me, what 
have you got to tell them. 1 tried to 
cast it all aside as 1 had always loved 
the Old Baptists and wanted to be 
with them. 

The Methodists were having a bi 
meeting and I thought I would go and 
hear them, but somehow I knew I 
would be out of place. 

A few nights after 1 dreamed I went 
to a Methodist Rhurch and all was 
dark. 1 came away and went to an 
Old Baptist church and there all was 
light and I remained and was happy. 

1 think last month was the longest 
I ever spent. It seemed 1 couldn't 
wait. 1 thought I would offer to the 
ehureh. So Saturday morning while I 
was cooking breakfast the thought 

what are you going to do. I tried to 
get out of going, but I couldn't sleep. 
T thought' I would wait until next 

r went back to church yesterday and 
while Mr. Ormond was preaching Twas 
made willing. He said it wasn't the 
big hope he wanted, it was the little 
one. I want a big hope. 

I came home again with a heavy 
heart and the thought came to me to 



write to my dear old father. So you 
see why 1 have written to you. 

I haven't told anyone about this. If 
you see anything in it please let me 
know what you think as 1 don't want 
to deceive anyone. Pray for your un- 
worthy daughter, 

LIZZIE. 

P. S. — 1 would be so glad to see you 
as I could talk about it better than I 
write. You will never know how much 
I enjoyed my visit to you. L. 

Conyers, Ga. 



COMMUNICATION 

And God said, Let the earth 
bring forth grass, the herb yielding 
seed and the fruit tree yielding fruit 
alter his kind, whose seed is in itself 
upon the earth. And it was so. And 
the earth brought forth grass, and 
herb-yielding Beed after his kind, and 
the tree yielding fruit whose seed was 
in itself, after his kind. And God saw 
that it was good. Genesis 1-11-12. 

The words ''his kind" are to be con- 
sidered in the above scripture for the 
writer was given to write it that way 
by inspiration of God, and it has a 
deep and wonderful meaning if the 

"The earth is the Lords' and the 
fulness thereof," all things were made 
by Him and without Him was not any- 
thing made that was made. The first 
book of the Bible, Genesis, is a won- 
derful book and especially regarding 
the natural creation, the words "his 
kind" means after Gods' kind, that is, 
he has made all things after his kind 
of a thing creat d, formed or made. 
' Every herb, every tree, every beast, 
cattle, creeping things, fowls of the 
air, fish of the sea, are after his kind. 
They are all his kind of a creation and 
formation. 

Paul in writing to the Church of 
God at Corinth says, there are bodies 
celestial and bodies terrestial, but tke 



150 



ZION'S LANDMAEK. 



glory of the celestial is one, and the 
glory of the terrcstial is another. 
There is one glory of the sun, and an- 
other of the moon, and another of the 
stars : for one star differeth from an- 
other star in glory. 

There is one kind of flesh of men, 
another flesh of beasts, another of 
birds, all of these are the creation and 
formation of God. Paul also speaks 
of the grain, it may chance of wheat 
or some other grain, but God giveth it 
(the grain) a body as it has pleased 
Him, and to every seed his (Godsj own 
body, the earth is the Lords' and the 
fulness thereof, the cattle upon a 
thousand hills are his and all have his 
own body. 

Paul in defending the doctrine of 
the resurrection of the dead has called 
attention to the bodies celestial and 
the bodies terrestial and the glory of 
the sun, another glory of the moon, an- 
other glory of the stars; for one star 
differeth from another star in glory, 
so also is the resurrection of the dead. 

Seems to me the apostle has given us 
something we do knew and realize in 
the church, for he is writing to the 
Church of God at Corinth upon this 
subject. 

We believe the stars shine by virtue 
of the glory of God, so every member 
of the body ®f Christ the church, 
whether apostles, prophets, or other 
gifts are what they are by the grace 
of. God and shine in the gospel firma- 
ment by the glory of God. 

John said, "we beheld His glory, 
the glory as of the only begotten of 
the Father full of grace and truth," 
Have we beheld the Lord as John 
wrote of Him ? 

I believe we have, Paul wrote con- 
cerning those that saw the Lord after 
His resurrection and says: "last of all 
He was seen of me as of one born out 
of due time." 

Paul saw Him on his way to Dam- 
ascus and tells his experience to those 



who contended against Him. 

Paul del ending the doctrine of the 
resurrection of the dead compares 
things celestial, and then the glory 
and the things terrestrial and their 
glory, calling attention to the stars as 
diilcring one from another in glory, so 
also is the resurrection of the dead, 
the apostles shine by the glory of God 
in the gospel heaven to us. 

Some times Paul shines brighter to 
us than others, sometimes Peter shines 
clear and bright to us, sometimes 
James and John, and others shine to 
us in a most wonderful way, and there 
are times when clouds so intervene 
that none of them shine to us. 

1 am satisfied that the measure of 
the gilt of Christ is the same, as Christ 
is the same yesterday, today and for- 
ever, but to us in this pilgrimage we 
travel through clouds, darkness and 
storms many times so that there must 
be a dispelling of the mists and gloom 
before we can see any of the heaven- 
ly bodies. 

As God has given to every seed his 
own body, (and this is Paul's decla- 
ration) so we believe that there is a 
natural body, and there is a spiritual 
body, and God giveth it a body as it 
hath pleased him. 

As we have borne the image of the 
earthy, we shall also bear the image 
of the heavenly, as He (Christ) is so 
shall we be. 

Beloved it doth not yet appear what 
we shall be, but we know that when 
He shall appear, we shall be like Him. 

Submitted in love of the truth. 

J. M. FENTON. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

James P. Jones. Dear Brother:— 
Your letter just now received and am 
glad to hear from you. It is grand 
and glorious to have the visitations of 
God's good Spirit in His unbounded 



ZTON'S LANDMARK. 181 



love. No such honor tan come from 
an earthly source as it is to be honor- 
ed with i he presence oi' Clod's love 
aud peace. It is wonderful how God's 
people can communicate in love one 
to another; for when we write in love 
to our dear brethren in Christ love is 
communicated like holy tire in the 
bosom of those who have the fellow- 
ship of the Spirit in their hearts. 

When it has pleased the great King 
of kings to honor a poor sinner with 
the forgiveness of sins and impart 
Divine life in him and Christ is form- 
ed in him the hope of glory, the an- 
chor of the soul, both sure and stead- 
fast, that leads us to God where Jesus 
the forerunner is gone. 

Then for Christ's sake we cannot 
esteem our brethren too highly, for 
w hen God has had respect to the sin- 
ner "for Christ's sake," we cannot 
show our love to God any better than 
to show that we love whom He loves 
and visits with His grace. 

1 am glad you felt lifted up after 
getting a few lines from me, although 
1 Eeel to be an unprofitable servant, if 
in reality I am a servant of God at 
all. 

Your brother in humble hope, 

D. SMITH WEBB. 
Hillsville, Va., R. 1. 



COMMUNICATION. 
Elder P. U. Gold, Dear Brother in 
Christ: — For some cause I have a 
mind to write you, but 1 am like one 
of old, who runs but cannot tell any 
tfcfaig. 1 have no tidings; only my 
old simple self seems to be all I 
know. 

Last night when sleep had gone 
from me my mind was led back twenty 
or th illy years ago when I so much 
enjoyed the (bar old Landmark. I 
thought of the many writers who con- 
tributed to the 'paper. Many of them 
have gone to their blest reward; and 
others, though they may be living are, 



like myself, perhaps too much engaged 
in providing for a family to take in- 
terest in the paper. To provide for 
this life honestly in the sight of men 
is commendable, but we should not 
neglect our religious duties for the 
luxuries of this world, if we do we 
will surely sutler for it. 

1 think I know what it is to be east 
into outer darkness where there is 
wailing and gnashing of teeth. For 
many years 1 have been travelling in, 
as it were, Egyptian darkness with 
scarcely a ray oi light. The clouds are 
so heavy thai the sunbeams do not 
pierce. My beloved is gone and I 
know not where to find him; T find 
myself powerless to drive away the 
or lighten up the Bi 

Yet. sometimes for several days I 
feel a deep calm, almost happy and 
contented. It seems there is no one 
like me. "While the clouds almost al- 
ways obscure the Sun, yet the temp- 
est seldom rages to toss my frail bark. 
I just go for a time in darkness and 
then a little light seems to penetrate 
and I feel a calm sweet peace of mind. 
I sometimes think that if I was a 
child of God I would not be as I am, 
but if I am not one I know of noth- 
ing I can do to make me one. So T 
can only be still and know that He is 
God. 

T want to as! you and all God's 
Children who see this to pray for me 
that my faith fail not and that I may 
be an honor to His cause. 

T think of several of the dear sisters 
who used to write" for the paper: Sally 
Smith. Rnth Taylor, Emma Hines and 
others. For a long time my health 
was poor and I did not expect to be 
spared so long, but the Lord has been 
good to me. and since I came to Mis- 
souri mv health has improved very 
much 1 nt T rm yet a poor, vile sin- 
net, and it' saved at all by grace. 

ESTA l^OYLES Af^TLWORTH. 
Mansfield. Mo. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



KIND WORDS. 

Dear Brother Gold:— You will find 
herewith enclosed $1.50 for which 
please extend my subscription to 
your highly esteemed paper, Zion's 
Landmark for another year. I count 
it a sweet pleasure to have the privi- 
lege of reading its wholesome and edi- 
fying pages which contain so many 
sweet and able letters contributed by 
those who love and have knowledge 
of the gospel of truth. Each gifted 
pen seems to strive for 'peace and for 
the upbuilding of Zion; but none more 
vso than those emanating from your 
own wise pen dipped in the fountain 
of God's love. 

I hope the Lord will spare you 
many more years to comfort His dear 
people, and when your ink and print- 
ing fluid cease to flow, your last gos- 
pel delivered, may you find it sweet 
to die pillowed upon Jesus' bosom, 
who will land you safely in the home 
of the blessed, there where congrega- 
tions never break up and sweet anth- 
ems of praises never end. 

What a glorious thought to think 
of dwelling forever in that celestial 
home where Jesus is and where our 
loved ones are. Sometimes I am en- 
abled to hope to meet them there. But 
doubts often assail me when I bow 
down in sorrow wondering what dis- 
position the Lorl will make of me— 
when the final summons comes — to 
this poor sinner. Will you not some- 
times pray for me. 

Your unworthy little sister, 

FANNIE PRICE. 

Oxford, Miss. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Elder P. D. Gold, Dear Brother in 
Christ I hope: — Enclosed I am sending 
my dues for the Landmark. I enjoy 
reading it and would almost be lost 
without it in my family. 



If 1 could write letters that would 
be as much comfort to the dear 
brethren and sisters as their writings 
are to me I surely would enjoy writ- 
ing. 

Well brother, I was back in Old 
Virginia this last Fall at the Moun- 
tain Association which was held • with 
Saddle Creek church. We had a nice 
meeting. 

'there are not many Primitive Bap- 
tists in this country, but one church 
near us, and it is nineteen miles away. 

Wishing you many of God's richest 
blessings with which to feed his sheep 
— also wishing you all a happy New 
Year. 

A loving brother and sister in 
Christ, we hope, 

DANIEL W1NGATE AND WIFE. 
Tilden, Neb. 



THE STAR OF BETHLEHEM. 

Every now and then some one will 
report that he has seen that Star some 
where in the heavens. Recently some 
one has reported through one of our 
secular papers that that star can now 
be seen in the Southeastern sky early 
in the morning and at a certain huur 
of the day. 

It is no trouble for any one who will 
get out of bed in time to see our fa- 
miliar neighbor, Venus. He is in his 
place as morning star every morning 
and will be for some time yet when 
he will be seen on the other side of 
the world a?; evening star. This has 
been the ease ever since man has seen 
the heavens and will be as long as 
there are any to look for him. Also 
Venus can be seen in the daytime if 
one can get the exact location of his 
place in the heavens. I have seen him 
and shown him to others. He is- the 
only bright star that shows in the 
Eastern sky in the morning at this 
time. 

What was the purpose of the ap- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



1 53 



pearing of the Star of Bethlehem at 
the time he appeared in Palistine I 
and to whom did he appear V 

Jt appears that none in all that 
country had seen or known anything 
of such a star. Nothing had been 
heard about it until the wise men 
eamie. They said, "AVhere is He that 
is born King of the Jews? for we have 
seen His star in the East, and are 
eome to worship Him." Mat. 2:2. 

Herod listened to their story but 
seemed to know nothing of their vis- 
ion. He gathered all the chief priests 
and scribes and demanded of them 
where Christ should be born. They bad 
received no sign that such an occur- 
ence had been. They could read the 
prophet and see that He should be 
born in Bethlehem of Juda, but they 
did not know that He was already 
born. They had seen no more evi- 
dence of such a thing than had been 
seen and expected by the Jews and 
others for times past. 

The shepherds were out watching 
their cocks but it is not said that they 
saw any sign of His birth as a Star 
in the heavens. No, none but the wise 
men saw it. It was His star and they 
knew it when it appeared. It was their 
guide to the place where the Lord was 
laid in the manger. When they were 
there with Him the work of that star 
was ended forever for Jesus shall 
never be born of woman any more. 
What He did He did forever. His work 
does not have to be done a second 
time for it is perfect. For this cause 
it is nonprogressive. It cannot be im- 
proved upon nor added to, nor can it 
go down. It is perfect in every re- 
spect. 

When these wise men were led to 
the place of Jesus' birth the star does 
not stay to guide them back home. 
The Lord appeared to them in a vis- 
ion and told them to go back another 
way because Herod would seek the 
young child's life. His request to go 



and worship him was hypocritical. 
The wise men did not obey him for 
the word of the Lord was in their 
hearts. They must obey the word of 
the Lord. They regarded not the 
commandment of the king though it 
was to the effect that he might wor- 
ship the King-Babe, Jesus the Christ. 
The word of the Lord said, "Return 
not to Herod," and they went to their 
own country. The work of that star 
was done. It need not ever appear 
any more to any mortal man, and it 
has not. 

Now, there is another birth. The 
birth in the Spirit, of that incorrup- 
table seed by the word of God that 
liveth and abideth forever. In this 
birth instead of the Lord being boin 
again into the world, this literal 
world, we are born again into that 
which is spiritual. 

In this new birth the Holy Ghost 
appeareth in the gospel heavens and 
leadeth us to the place of the sacri- 
fice of our Lord for us and we are 
made to see for ourselves that salva- 
tion is of the Lord. That there is none 
other name under heaven given among 
m;en, whereby we must be saved. 

This appearing of the Lord is not 
seen by the natural eye, nor under- 
stood by the natural mind. When it 
comes the expectation of the flesh 
perishes and all its hopes come to 
naught. No sound of the voices of na- 
ture can have such an effect as is here 
(produced. The confidence of the 
things and helps of this world all per- 
ish as the teachings of this blessed 
Messenger grow up in this one now 
born of the Lord. The Spirit is the 
only Guide to be depended upon, and 
He is sure to always point to Jesus as 
the only way of truth and life. It not 
only tells us that He is come in the 
flesh but that He has lived, and died 
and risen again, and that He has as- 
cended up to the Father where He 
ever maketh intercession for us ac- 



m 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



cording to the will of God. Also that 
He has given us His spirit to be our 
continual comforter, to guide us in 
the way of the truth, and that we are 
yet in the flesh and weak, can io 
nothing without Him, need him for 
every turn that we may not go 
astray. As it is said of Jesus, '"He 
shall not fail nor be discouraged till 
He hath brought forth judgment unto 
victory," even so it may be said of the 
blessed Holy Ghost of God. He shall 
not fail nor be discouraged till He has 
brought all the redeemed of the Lord 
to a saving knowledge of the truth of 
their redemption in Christ the Lord. 
This is His business here. The Lord 
said of Him, "It is expedient for you 
that I go away, for if I go not away 
the Comforter will not come, but if 1 
go I will send Him, and when He is 
come He will take of the things of 
mine and show them unto you, and He 
will bring all tilings to your remem- 
brance whatsoever I have said unto 
you." The things of the Spirit are 
as sure to us as the things of Jesus 
Christ. Yes, they are one and the 
same things. Jesus did for us and 
now the Spirit makes known to us 
the things which He did. As Jesus 
never failed to do what He came to 
do, even so the Spirit will never fail 
to do what has been appointed to Him 
to do. We are as helpless to remem- 
ber the things which the Lord has 
done for us as we were to do them in 
the first place. If we could have &<S.ie 
those things which are to be done in 
salvation we would not have needed 
the Lord to do them for us. Now if 
we can remember the things wh'eh 
the Lord has done and revealed to us 
we do not need the Holy Spirit to be 
our guide in the remembrance. If 
there is any other way for us to get 
those things which the Father has "'or 
us we do not need the Holy Spirit to 
give them to us. 
As He so surely and safely guided 



the wise men to the 'place where the 
infant Jesus lay, so does He in every 
case without a single failure guide 
all those to whom He comes to the 
cross of our Lord and show us that 
glorious work of life by His death. 
He never fails in one ease. No, not 
one. Then all the way we go we need 
Him to direct us in every step. "With- 
out Him we would go astray. We 
would be found with the world trust- 
ing in the nesh and going as far from 
God as sheep can run. 

Once I had walked ten miles to au 
appointment and spoken to the peo- 
yle. I was walking that ten l'les 
back home. I was very rebelious ind 
full of murmuring and hardness. I 
felt that I had the hardest lot )f viy 
one who ever claimed the name of a 
minister of the Lord. Somehow, I 
did not know how, my mind was turn- 
ed back to see the way the Lord had 
brought me from a little child. I sur- 
veyed all the way up to the time \ 
was then living. When I got there a2? 
was light and pence. The spirit of 
murmuring way gone and I was sing- 
ing praises to the Lord. I felt willing 
to do a thousand time:; more if I could 
and then to feel that 1 had done 
nothing. I was made to ask myself 
the question, "Why could I not have 
looked back there before?" Some- 
thing seemed to say in my heart, "He 
shall bring all things to your remem- 
brance whatsoever I have said unto 
you," and I saw the light at once. 

This, my brethren, with other ex 
periences I have passed through, 
makes me know that I am as passive 
in obedience as I was in regeneration. 
I can do nothing without Him. T 
could not be quickened without Hitn 
and now I cannot take one right step 
without Him. For this cause I bless 
Him for His Spirit to guide me and 
comfort me to Avalk in His way. Just 
as soon as I move without Him I am 
out of the way. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Oh for this never erring Star to 
guide me all the days of my life Jhat 
J may ever walk in the way of Salva- 
tion forever. Amen ! 

Your brother in hope, 

L. H. HARDY. 

Atlantic, N. C. 



THREE BOOKS OF INTEREST. 

Have You Read Them? 
Biographical* History of Baptist 
Ministers 

containing neail) 1000 sketches, 381 
pictures of Ministers, Deacons and tal- 
ented Sisters, together with an Appen- 
dix of much useful information — 

Price $2.00. 
Also Theodosin Ernest, The Heroine of 
Faith, and Ten Days in Search 
of the Church 
both these books in one volume and 
contain 637 pages. No work of its size 
and cost is a better defense of Bible 
doctrine and practice, or sets the one 
church Christ built in fairer colors. 

Price $1.25. 
These books are well printed on good 
paper, substantially and neatly bound, 
and above all they are highly endorsed 
by Elders Ilassell, Cash, Thompson : 
Gold, Waters, Dalton, Chick, Hurst, 
Webb, Lester, Cayce, Branscome, Nor- 
ton, Stewart, Henderson, Hanks, Dur- 
rnd, Daily, Moore, Oliphant, Lundy, 
Morris, Hardy, Raulston, Pope, Mew- 
born, Gilbert, Farmer, Denny, Flkins, 
and hundreds of other ministers and 
editors the country over. 
As long as they last both volumes will 
be sent together for $2.75 and it you 
are not pleased with your ptrrehase 
they may be returned in good order 
and money will be refunded. 

Send ?.il orders to 
R. H. PITTMAN, Luray, Va. 



Elder J. T. Collier's address is 
changes from Kcnly, N. C, R. F. D. to 
Micro, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



'"Remove not the ancient landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



P. D. GOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



VOL. XLVU'l. NUMBER 7. 



Entered at the post office at Wilson as 
second class matter. 



WILSON, N. C, FEBRUARY 15, 1915 



EDITORIAL 
_ 

NO PROPI1EKCY OF SCRIPTURE 
IS OF ANY PRIVATE INTER- 
PRETATION. 2ND 
PETER 1 :20. 

There is no writing equal to the 
scripture. No man, nor all men, 
could ever write or speak as the scrip- 
ture does. Every word of it is true 
as it was uttered; because holy men 
of God spake as they were moved by 
the Holy Ohost. There can be no 
blunder in this; no mistake. 

It matters not how improbable, or 
according to nature, how impossible 
of occurrence it may be, or how much 
opposition there may be to its ac- 
complishment, it matters not. He who 
declares the end from the beginning 
lias moved these holy men of God to 
write. These men are children that 
will not lie. They are moved to 
speak. How often did Jesus say, "It 
is written." The teaching of Jesus 
set uip the truth that the scripture 
cannot be broken. It matters not how 
remote in the past that the Avords of 
prophecy have been uttered. It is 



156 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



never oi' any private interpretation. 
The revolution or changes of men 
affect it not. The unbelief of men 
does not render the word of God un- 
certain or ineffectual. However un- 
popular it may become, because of the 
corruption of men, or their depart- 
ure from the truth, let God be true, 
but every man become or be proven 
to be a liar. 

How often did Jesus say in sub- 
stance, the scripture must be fulfilled. 
Just before his crucifixion he said he 
could pray to his Father, and he would 
give him more than twelve legions of 
angels. But how then would the scrip- 
ture be fulfilled that thus it must be. 
Jesus came to fulfill the scripture. He 
loved his Father and came to do his 
Father's will in earth. He delighted 
to do that holy will. 

How good it is when we have the 
love of truth in us, when we truly de- 
sire his will to be done on earth. If 
the word of God is a lamp to our feet, 
and a light to our pathway, shining in 
a dark place until the day dawns, and 
the day-star arise in our hearts, sure- 
ly we should heed it most carefully. 

Peter was moved to write the bless- 
ed things of the kingdom of heaven 
that the brethren, after his decease, 
should have these things always in re- 
membrance. For he wrote, we have 
not followed cunningly devised fables, 
when we made known unto you the 
power and coming of our Lord Jesus 
Christ ; but were eye witnesses of his 
majesty. For he received from God 
the Father honor and glory when there 
came such a voice to him from the 
excellent glory, 'This is my beloved 
Son, in whom I am well pleased." 
His voice we heard (Peter, James and 
John) which came from heaven, when 
we were with him. That was when 
Peter said it is good for us to be here. 
Let us build three tabernacles, one 
for Jesus, and one for Moses, and one 
for Elias, who also sppeTired with 



Jesus in glory, when he shone in his 
glorious majesty. That excellent 
voice from the Father said, This is 
my beloved Son. Hear ye him. That 
blessed voice of command from the 
Father shall never return to him 
void, hut shall all be fulfilled. Like- 
wise or also we have a more sure word 
of prophecy. More sure than what I 
More sure than any cunningly de- 
vised fable, for seeing and beholding 
Jesus and hearing the voice of the 
Father from heaven is not a cunning- 
ly devised fable, but an eternal, per- 
fect reality. We have also, and in 
confirmation of this witness, the scrip- 
ture that we do well to take heed to, 
as a light that shineth in a dark place, 
until the day dawn, and the day-star 
arise in your hearts, or until the sec- 
ond coming of Jesus Christ when all 
that God has promised from the foun- 
dation of the world shall have been 
accomplished, for the heavens must 
receive Jesus until this restitution of 
all things. Nor will ever there be 
any other dispensation, nor any new 
doctrine preached, but this doctrine 
is final, and these are the last days, 
and hence we shall contend earnestly 
for the faith once delivered to the 
Saints. Take heed that no man de- 
ceive you. Cursed be he that adds to 
or takes from this word of God, but 
blessed is he that endures unto the 
end. 

The like precious faith given to 
those that believe as the apostles do, 
keeps their hearts and minds in per- 
fect peace through Christ Jesus, and 
identifies them as followers of the 
Lamb of God whithersoever he goes. 
How blessed to abide in the doctrine 
of Jesus Christ, and cleave to the 
scripture teaching which is final. 

If any man or an angel preach any 
other doctrine than that which you 
have already received let him be ac- 
cursed. The church of Jesus Christ 
is the pillar and ground ef tke truth 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



157 



built upon the foundation of the 
apostles and prophets Jesus Christ be- 
ing the chief corner stone elect, prec- 
ious, in whom the whole building fit- 
ly bound together groweth up into an 
holy temple in the Lord. 

The Lord's dock is exercised with 
an abiding and an earnest desire to be 
found in the truth as it is in Jesus 
Christ, and him crucified. Who is the 
head of all 'principality and power, and 
is above every name that is named. 

P. D. G. 



A NEED. 

There is need of careful attention 
to daily affairs at home. To forget or 
neglect nursing and pushing affairs of 
farm life, so that we find the things 
needed to support human life are 
wanting there, and are not to be 
found, shows a culpable neglect of an 
important business. The greatest care 
should be given to things nearest 
home, of course without injury to the 
interests of other people. Really the 
careful attention to things of greatest 
importance at home will prevent your 
own family from being a burden to 
othors, but will also better enable them 
to aid others that may be in need. 

Bread is the staff of life. Farmers 
should look first to the production of 
food, and providing raiment. 

The bread of heaven and the water 
of life supplied from the great store- 
house of our Joseph, or seeking 'first 
the kingdom of God and his right- 
eousness, is the only wise pursuit of 
the true Israelite. While in a land of 
oppression and bondage Israel is fed 
from the bounty of the Lord Jesus 
who gave himself as mediator a ran- 
som for all to be testified in due time. 
The due time is when it is witnessed 
to each one in the time of love, the set 
time to favor Zion. To walk about 
Zion at such times, and beohld her 
palaew, and mark well k»r bulwark* 



is the pleasant occupation of Zion's 
children. 

P. D. G. 



HOW TO SEE GOOD DAYS. 

"For he that will love life, and see 
goods days, let him refrain his ton- 
gue from evil, and his lips that they 
seak no guile." 

Let him eschew^ evil, and do good; 
let him seek peace, and ensue it. 1st 
Peter 3:10-11. 

The one that is blest with a true 
desire to live as this scripture states 
has a wonderful incentive to right- 
eous living, and a good beginning for 
that race. Noble aspirations surely 
are a good start for that goodly race. 
A pure purpose is a great guide in the 
race of life. Fixed, righteous prin- 
ciples to preside and direct the con- 
duet are a friend that gives good 
counsel, and strengthens to endur- 
ance. It makes one courageous to feel 
that his aim in life is good, is sup- 
ported by the scripture, approved in 
conscience, and endorsed by the ex- 
perience of men that are exercised by 
good ideals. 

To love life is to value and appre- 
eiate it as the gift of God, and as be- 
stowed for a good purpose. If one is 
wise redeeming the time, he feels that 
he has no time to waste, pervert or 
tli row away his life, because it is 
given for a purpose that is good; but 
that if one throws away his time he 
commits the blunder of damaging his 
own judgment, crippling his ability to 
run well, and darken his vision so that 
he cannot see how to manage his af- 
fairs in the stormy days of life. 

It requires the best faculties of ones 
mind, the clearest judgment to enable 
one to steer clear of the quicksands 
and perils that imperil his pathway. 
What if his vision is darkened by 
yielding to snares that are set to en- 
trap kiia? Suppose kt k«f«m«« Ha- 



158 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



sipated so that he enters the race be- 
numbed, But if be possesses facul- 
ties clear and well trained for the ef- 
fort, and is thus girded he will enter 
into the conflict free from the incum- 
brances of tbe drunken, the liar, the 
rogue, the lover of money that sup- 
poses that gain is godliness; for such 
as are controled by these heavy 
weights cannot run well. 

Life is the gift cf God. Its uses 
are therefore not to* be abused. We 
have no right to waste or pervert the 
purposes of living. How shameful to 
blur your frame with the bruises of 
dissipation, and bespot it with the 
disfiguration of debauched conduct. It 
is worse than to be crippled with 
maimed or broken limbs. 

We love to see one so well pre- 
served toward the end of his life that 
no disfiguration mars his countenance, 
or besots his visage, but well pre- 
served he shows physical vigor and 
health, and manifests moral and men- 
tal vigor to old age, so that he sees 
good days, and is refreshed in his last 
time as a tree planted by the rivers 
of water, whose limbs hold a beautiful 
proportion with no dotage, and bear- 
ing fruit down to old age, and whose 
leaves are not withered, showing that 
the current of life is not chilled, but 
still is active to vitalize and invigorate 
him to life's end. 

How prudent that a bridle curbs 
bis lips to speak evil of no man, but 
speak the truth always. People should 
not feel that they must always be talk- 
ing. TheHongue is an untamed, un- 
ruly member, so that he that has it 
bridled and is careful of his speech, 
and thinks before he speaks, is not 
mortified with rash speech and surely 
has good moments. 

The mouth should receive food for 
the body that ministers health to it. 
and also should use speech that af- 
fords comfort to the mind. 

Also one should eschew evil, should 



keep himself far from wrong and 
should seek good, and do that which 
is good, and shun that which has guile 
or deceit in it. 

Let him seek peace and ensue it. In 
these days of wrath, when war with 
every evil that attends it is rampant 
in the land, when bitter winds, wrath- 
ful passions and every wicked prin- 
ciple seems to be uncaged, and turn- 
ed loose to inflict its curses on the 
world, one that reflects may see some- 
thing of the sweets and joy of peace 
which is the product of good behav- 
ior, the fruit of wise sowing, the reap- 
ing of a good ripened harvest. 

How good to be quiet, well be- 
haved, reconciled to your lot, content 
with such things as you have, fretting 
not because of evil doers, so that the 
wear and tear of fretting and discon- 
tent is escaped, and the antagonism 
of the warring, consuming enemies of 
vitiated nature is escaped, and the last 
days of this character are crowned 
with peace and truth. 

P. D. G. 



THE JUST JUDGE. 

God hath appointed a day in which 
lie will judge the world in righteous 
ness by that man whom he hath or- 
dained; whereof he hath given assur- 
ance unto all men in that he hath 
raised him from the dead. Acts 17:31. 

This holy man came from heaven, 
was made, shown to be perfect through 
suffering, and became the author of 
unfailing, perfect salvation to all them 
that love and serve him. 

This is a perfect judge. None that 
know him could desire any other to 
judge them. His days are everlast- 
ing. None that love him could wish 
any appeal, for his judgment is a 
final disposition of all cases, because 
all judgment is given into his hand, 
and because God hath appointed a day 
in which he will judge the world in 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



159 



righteousness by that man whom he 
hath ordained. Then the judge is ap- 
pointed, and the day is appointed, and 
the judge has been raised from the 
dead, then what is lacking to consti- 
tute this a 'perfect way of the hnal ad- 
judication of all matters? 

What better time than the present 
for the hnal settlement of all matters 
of trouble. 

We are to be still and know that 
he is God. Shall not the judge of all 
the earth do right? 

How great is his mercy, his wisdom, 
his goodness, and his power. He is a 
just God and a Saviour. 

There shall be a resurrection both 
of the just and the unjust. 

Why should it be thought a thing 
incredible with you that God should 
raise the deadt 

P. D. G. 



duaries. 



WILLIAM R. STANCIL. 

William R. Stancil was born on Feb. 
3rd, 1893 and ended his life April 16, 
1914. 

He was the youngest of the four 
sons of INlr. and Mrs. James T. Stan- 
cil. 

He was a young man full of prom- 
ise, his mind being bright and he was 
large of heart. It is not surprising 
that such a person made many friends 
during his short life. These friends 
were true to him to the last. 

During his last long lingering ill- 
ness all Avas done for him that could 
be done by his faithful, devoted 
mother and many others. 

He seemed much interested in his 
soul's welfare and was always glad to 
have his friends read the Bible to him 
and sing and pray in his presence. 



He left this world declaring that he 
had given his heart to Jesus. 

"'Sleep on Beloved, sleep and take thy 
rest, 

Lay down thy head upon the Saviour's 
breast ; 

We loved thee well, but Jesus loved 
thee best, 

Good night, Good night. 

His last words were: "Doctor Best, 
I am saved, but if it had not been for 
my good old mother I would have died 
long ago." 

Written by his/ mother, 

MRS. SALLIE STANCIL. 
Wilson, N. C. 



JAMBS M. ALDERSON AND ELIZA- 
BETH N. ANDERSON. 

I will write in memory of my grand- 
parents, who have been dead five and 
six years. Elizabeth N. Alderson 
was born January 26, 1824, and died 
June 4, 1908. James M. Alderson was 
born January 6, 1S28, and died Aug- 
ust 1, 1909. .lames M. Alderson and 
Elizabeth N. Lewis were married Jan- 
uary 6, 1849. They lived happy to- 
gether 59 years. Unto this union 
were born eight children, four girls 
and four boys. All of them are still 
living. The youngest girl and boy 
lived with their mother and father as 
long as they lived, and did all that a 
child could for them. The four girls 
are members of the Primitive Baptist 
church. Grandma and grandpa were 
Primitive Baptist believers, but never 
united with the church. Grandma was 
a dear lover of good singing. She 
would ask us to sing as she thought 
singing was so pretty. She was sick 
about three weeks, all was done, for 
her that willing hands could do; but 
her lime had come. While she was 
sick she would talk of going home, 
and would sing I'm going to join the 



06 



166 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



army of the Lore', and I believe she 
has joined that army. Grandma was 
a dear old Jady, was strong in faith, 
as long as she lived, loved to go to 
preaching when she could, was kind to 
all, and was willing to do all she could 
to help the sick, cheerful, but could 
give good advice, and tried to live as 
nigh right as she could, I believe. She 
was a good wife, mother, grandmother 
and neighbor. Words fail to express 
how we did miss her, and still miss 
her dear form, but I cannot wish her 
back, as I think she is so much better 
off than we are. Burial services were 
held at the Alderson burying ground 
by Elder J. P. Johnson. Grandpa 
lived one year two months and six 
days after grandma died, but he was 
so sad and lonely it din't really look 
like grandpa. He was an upright old 
gentleman, seemed to try to live right, 
and treated everybody that he came 
in contact with right; was strong in 
faith to the last. I never saw any one 
that craved death like he did. He 
was not sick long. All was done for 
him that loving hands could, but none 
could stay the icy hand of death. He 
spoke of dying and seemed ready and 
willing to go. There was an old col- 
ored man in to see him while he was 
sick, and he told the old colored man 
he did not see why the neighbors 
didn't pray for him to die. I can't 
tell how very dear he was to us, and 
we miss him even till now; but I feel 
like it is a sin to wish him back, for 
this was not his home. I can picture 
him sitting on the porch, reading his 
Bible that seemed to be his greatest 
pleasure. He was a dear old man. To 
know him was to love him. He was 
laid to rest beside his dear wife. 
Burial services were held at the grave 
by Elder J. A. Shaw to the comfort of 
the family. May God make the family 
as ready and willing to go as grandpa 
was. Please publish this in the Land- 



mark if you have space. Written by 
their granddaughter. 



ZILPHIA HUMPHREY. 

It is with a sad and heavy heart I 
attempt to write a sketch about my 
dear aunt who departed this life this 
last past October, a year ago. 

She left a devoted husband and 3 
children to mourn their loss. She was 
the mother of 4 children, but one of 
them died 14 days before she did, to 
the day.. Her little daughtEer died 
with a disease called diptheria. She 
was not confined to the bed long be- 
fore the Lord took her to a better 
home. She was buried at the family 
grave yard where her grandfather and 
grandmother were buried. Fourteen 
days from then her loving, devoted 
mother was laid to rest beside her lov- 
ing daughter. 

Her stay on earth was 34 years. She 
united with the Primitive Baptist 
church just about a year before she 
died. She was baptized by Elder 
Isaac Jones. 

Her membership was at the "Bay" 
church. She lived a faithful member 
as long as she lived. 

We believe she is at rest and truly 
hope she is. Her sufferings were great 
and no tongue can tell how bad she 
did suffer. 

We hope our loss is her eternal gain, 
and we feel it is. 

She was buried at the same place 
her daughter was. 

Her song was: 

"Come thou fount of every blessing." 

Oh how sweet it was to hear her 
sing it and to think we will never hear 
that sweet voice again. 

Oh how hard it is to part with her, 
but God knoweth best. God giveth 
and God taketh away. 

Oh may we be prepared to meet our 



DION'S LANDMARK. 



l«\eU wues «m that happy shore where 
there will bo parting ever more. 

"Sleep OA «ie*r aunt, and take thy 
rest, 

Ced ealled jom home, for he loved yoa 
test. 

A precious one from us has gone, 
A voiee we loved is stilled; 
A place is vacant in her home 
Which can never be filled. 

We miss thy kind and willing hand, 
Thy fond and earnest care. 
Her home is lonely without thee. 
We miss thee everywhere. 

It was hard to give her up, 
You all know that was true — 
To part from my dear aunt, 
But God we trust in you. 

And now she is gone — 
W T e are left behind. 
May God call us home 
At the appointed time. 

Farewell dear, but not forever; 
There will be a glorious dawn, 
When we shall meet to part no more 
On the resurrection morn. 

Written by her loving nephew, 
FRED W. RHODES. 

Verona, N. C. 



WILLIAM ROWLAND WIGGINS. 

Mr. Wiggins was born March 22nd, 
1836. He was a man of many good 
traits of character, was well inform- 
ed on many subjects and principles. 
He had an excellent memory, perhaps 
knew more history than any man in 
his community. He was bright of con- 
ception, and especially before his de- 
cline of old age, with a deep love for 
knowledge. He was what we term a 
good man, a kind neighbor, honest 



and accommodating and was loved 
most by those who knew him best. He 
was naturally industrious, a good old 
time farmer, and amassed enough of 
this world to supply his family with 
every natural blessing. 
He joined the church at Upper Town 
Creek in 1872, was baptized by Elder 
Bennet Pitt and was a member for 
several years, and was a gifted and 
able scripture expounder, and was 
wonderfully deep in election and pie- 
destination, and was loved by his 
churches. By some cause he was ex- 
cluded from the body, but not in mind 
from the church. But the sheep on the 
outside cannot graze on the wild oats 
and thistles, hence he always attended 
preaching, and manifested a love lor 
the brethren and churcli with love 
and christian fortitude, ever ready to 
abase men and exalt the Lord. i [ is 
company was rich and entertaining 
to God's little ones. 

He had been a little poorly, bin died 
soon after he was taken badly off. 

The writer was with him in his last 
hours. He seemed to be resigned to 
God's will and fervently prayed to 
die easy. His prayer was granted. 

This was on Dec. 31, 1912. He lay- 
ed his armor by and finished his 
course with joy, and is sleeping in 
Jesus awaiting the resurrection to go 
home and dwell with the angels and 
sing the song of Moses and the Lamb. 

J. J. THORNE. 

Elm City, N. C. 



MRS. EVA BECK. 

Death is always sad, especially 
when it comes to claim the mother. 
The death angel visited the home of 
Mr. I. E. Beck, Nov. 25, 1914, and 
claimed his beloved wife Eva. Mrs. 
Beck had been in failing health for 
some time, but was not confined to her 
bed but one week. 

She was born May 1, 1869 near 



162 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Ovedmore, Granville County, N. C, 
and was the daughter of the late Sam- 
uel H. Perry who was a 'prominent 
eitizen of that community. 

Her funeral was conducted by Elder 
Denny at her home in Durham, N. C, 
and her remains laid to rest in the 
family burying ground near Creed- 
more, N. C. 

Besides her husband she is survived 
by six children: Kate, Lizzie, Noah, 
Rebecca, Alda and Paul to whom she 
had been a true mother, not allowing 
a reasonable wish to pass unnoticed. 

She did what her hands found to do 
with all her might; and has now re- 
ceived her crown of righteousness in 
heaven. 

The vacant place, the empty chair, 
We see them day by day ; 
And Oh, it fills our hearts with care 
Since our dear mother went away. 

A precious one from us is gone. 
A voice we loved is stilled, 
A place is vacant in our home 
Which never can be filled. 

But again we hope to meet thee 
When our day of life is fled ; 
And we hope in heaven to greet thee 
Where no farewell tears are shed. 

KATE BECK. 



JESSE L. WILLIAMS. 

Brother Jesse L. Williams was bora 
Oct. 6th, 1864, and was a son of Elder 
W. B. Williams, late of Wilson countv, 
N. C. 

He joined Upper Town Creek church 
of Wilson county about 1903. on the 
3rd Sunday in May if memory serves 
me right. He was baptized by Elder 
Wm. Fly and Jeremiah Whitehead. 

Bro. Williams never did enjoy good 
health. He was always very weak 
physically though bright mentally. He 



had partial paralysis of which he was 
taken several years before his death, 
though lie could sit in his chair until 
the last year of his life. 

Amid all the aches both natural and 
spiritual he seemed to bear them with 
much christian patience and fortitude. 
His conversation was godly, his walk 
was good, he was of a kind and gentle 
disposition, and abhored a lie. Thus 
combined it made him what we call a 
genuine Old Baptist. 

He was taken severely sick one week 
previous to his death. His doctor was 
faithfid. but he continued to grow 
worse until the end ; and often ex- 
pressed a desire to go to Town Creek 
church one more time : but he received 
his Master's message. child your 
Father calls, come home, and he fell 
asleep in Jesus on Nov. 17th, 1912. His 
remains were buried at Upper Town 
Creek church. 

He leaves brothers and sisters to 
mourn his loss. The good Lord bless 
them. 

SurWy an humble man is gone, but 
not dead, but sleeps, waiting the 
erowning day of the Lord. 

How sweet is such a thought. 

J. J. THORNE. 

El.n City, N. C. 



MRS. M. L. GUTHRIE. 

It has been only a short while since 
the death angel of heaven laid his icy 
hand upon one of my dearest friends 
Mrs. Fleda Guthrie. She was one of 
the sweetest women I ever saw and 1 
had knoAvn her all my life. 

She was the wife of Mr. M. L. Guth- 
rie and had been married for nearly 3 
years. She was twenty-five years of 
age. She leaves a kind and loving 
husband and two children, Edna, one 
year and seven months old and little 
Fleda sick only two days. 

She was a kind wife, a loving mother 
and a crood neighbor, always ready to 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



163 



lend a helping hand to those in dis- Which never can be filled." 
tress. She was conscious of all her 

sufferings and bore them with much Written by 

patience. She said her prayers over MARTHA WILLIAMS. 

and over during the night and prayed 

tor everybody. MBS. MARY BARNARD. 

A few minutes before she died 

her husband went to her bedside and Mary Elizabeth Barnard was a 

asked her how she was. She said she daughter of Samuel F. and Rachel 

was happy and that all was well with Turner, and was born April 11, 1862, 

her. Then she passed away like one and died July 25, 1913. 
going to sleep. She was married to J. C. Barnard 

1 feel sure that she is sweetly rest- <<n June 8, 1876. 
ing in Jesus patiently waiting for that To them were born seven daughters 

great day when she will come forth and three sous. A son aged 5 years, 

and gladly welcome her dear com- find an infant daughter preceded her 

panion and little darling babes into to the grave. She leaves a devoted 

the kingdom of heaven where no husband and eight children to mourn 

more good byes are said but where all the absence of a faithful companion 

will be peace and joy. It is consol- and a kind and loving mother. She 

ing to know that if we lead a Christ- also leaves an aged mother, two 

Ike life here we will hereafter meet brothers and one sister. She looked 

our lo\ed one;. But it is hard to part well to the ways of her household, till 

with those near and dear to us. None the Lord in his wisdom freed her 

but these who have tasted the bitter from the cares of this life, and as we 

eup ean sympathize. believe took her to himself. 

Mrs. Guthrie was a faithful mem- lie gives and lie takes away at h'.s 

her of the church, always filling her OWI) divine will, and blessed he his 

seat when possible and alwa;. s we!- holy name. We pray that God in his 

coming pastor, brethren and sisters mercy may he with the bereaved ones 

to her home. in tic sad and lonely hours of their 

ib r death Ms so sudden that we afflict!©*, ami manifest to them that 

scarcely realize she has gone and we their earthly loss is her eternal gain, 

all so hated to give her up. but the s,, <" foughl a good fight, kept the faith 

I. oi.i giveth and the Lord taketh i ' ,1<1 is WW resting from all the toil? 

away, Messed he fte name of the and cares of "this earth. She often 

Lord. said she did not dread the change, ex- 

The lonely hu-.band h/ our svm- <*P* the leaving of her loved ones be- 

,athv: may the Lord Wess him and h5Md . aud often repeated, with the 

he'p'him to hear h s lr,,,',,,. P©*> *S«H? «« m , ake * dymg bed feel 
soft as downy pillows are. 



•"Why do we mourn departed friend-! 

Or shake at death's alarms. 
Tis but the voice that Jesus sends 
To call us to His arms." 

"A precious one from us has gone, 
A voice we loved h stilled; 
A place is vacant in our home, 



•While on his breast I'll lean my 
head, 

And breathe my life out sweetly 

there." 

This dear sister had been a member 
of the Primitive Baptist church since 
the age of 26 years, when she gav« 



164 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



full aud complete evidence of a hope 
in Jesus, to the church at Charity, Pat- 
rick County, Ya., and was baptized by 
Elder \V lley Via. Later she moved 
her memberchip to Country Line, Floyd 
County, Va., and lived a devoted chris- 
tian till death. 

Too much could not be said of her 
good qualities, orderly walk and God- 
ly conversation. She was a bright 
jewel of God's mercy, firm in the 
faith once delivered to the saints. 

She was a great sufferer, but never 
was heard to murmur. 

On April the 14th, 1912, she was 
seized with hemorrhage from which 
none thought she would survive, but 
she told her children not to weep for 
she would not die a minute before her 
time. In a few months she could walk 
and in June expressed a desire to vis- 
it two of her daughters and her mother 
whose homes are in Floyd county. 

She said if her health became such 
as to prevent her return to her home 
in Roanoke, it would be all right for 
she desired to be buried at her old 
home in Floyd. She had prayed to be 
at one more country meeting (as she 
called it) and the Lord blessed her to 
attend meeting at Payne Creek, and 
commune with the church, much to 
her enjoyment. Her mother's home 
was the last place she visited, where 
she was again taken with hemorrhage. 
She succumbed to this attack, and af- 
ter growing quite weak, whispered 
'it is all right," and peacefully passed 
away in the room she was married in. 

Her funeral was preached by Elder 
P. G. Lester whose remarks were both 
impressive and consoling. 

She was laid to rest in the family 
grave yard near her old home. 

There is no doubt within my mind 
That she is now in glory, 
Praising God for grace divine 
A ** wt«r«y k« kat akrrrm k«r. 



So ask the Lord to help you bow, 
And pray to meet your mother, 
For she is sweetly resting now, 
With Christ her elder brother. 

We could not wish her back again 
To suffer as she did. 
0, Father, help us be resigned 
To thy most holy will. 

EMMA SPARKS. 

Roanoke, Va. 



ELDER G. M. TRENT. 

Danville— at night Feb. 22. ' 
Cane Creek — 23. 
Malmasonl — 24. 
Flippens Mill — 25. 
Walton— 26. 
Mountain Springs — 27. 
Banister — 28. 
White Thorn— March 1. 
Franklin Junction — 2. 
Weatherford — 3. 
Ephesus — 4. 
Strawberry — i. 
Mountain— 6. 
Axton — 7. 
Friendship — 8. 
Spray — at night 8. 
Conveyance needed when off Rail- 
road. 



ELDER J. D. YASS, OF VIRGINIA 

Wilmington — Saturday and third 
Sunday in February. 
Tuesday — Yapps. 
Wednesday — Bay. 
Thursday — Ward's Will. 
Friday — Northeast. 
Saturday — Hadnot's Creek. 
Fourth Sunday— White Oak. 
Southwest — Tuesday after. 
Maple Hill — Wednesday. 
Cypress Creek — Thursday. 
Muddy CTeels — Friday. 
Goldsboro — Saturday night. 
M'«»»rial — Fi.rat Snaday i« March, 



ZION'S LANDMARK. f f 



165 



Lower Black Creek — Monday. 

Wilson — Tuesday night. 

Upper Town Creek — Wed. 

Pleasant Hill— Thursday. 

Mill Branch — Friday. 

Falls — Saturday and second Sunday. 

Nashville — Monday. 

Peachtree Tuesday. 

Sandy Grove — Wednesday. 

Healthy Plains — Thursday. 

Contentnea — Friday. 

Scott 's — Saturday. 

Upper Black Creek — Third Sunday. 

Beulah — Monday. 

Creeches — Tuesday. 

Salem— Wednesday. 

Clayton— At night. 

Winston-Salem- — ihursday night. 

E. E. LUNDY. 



ELDER W. R. CRAFT. 

Angier — Second Sunday in Feb. 
Sandy Grove — Monday. 
Fellowship — Tuesday. 
Willow Spring — VV ednesday. 
M iddle Creek — Thursday. 
Knleigli — Thursday night. 
Durham — Friday night. 
Burlington — Saturday night. 
High Point— 3rd Sundaj 
Lexington— Monday. 
Pine-— Tuesday. 
Salisbury — Wednesday. 
Abbott's Creek— Thursday. 
Saints Delight— Friday. 
Winston-Salem — Saturday and 4th 
Sunday. 



ELDERS P. W. WILLIARD AND 

samuel McMillan. 

Durham — Tuesday after 4th Sun- 
day in Feb. 
Raleigh — at night. 
Willow Spring — Wednesday. 
Fellowship — Thursday. 
Coats — Friday. 
Bstksaida— Saturday. 
!•■••« — 1st Swdty at litrek. 



Hannahs Creek — Monday. 
Four Oaks — at night. 
Bethany — Tuesday. 
Goldsboro — Wednesday. 
Nahunta — Thursday. 
Tysons — Friday. 
Sparta — Saturday. 
Cross — 2nd Sunday. 
Flat Swamp — Monday. 
Robersonville — Tuesday. 
Conoho — Wednesday. 
Kehukee — Thursday. 
Lawrence — Friday. 
Williams — Saturday. 
Falls Sunday. 
Wilson — Monday. 
They will need conveyance. 



ELDER J. C. HOOKS. 

Goldsboro — Thursday night, Feb. 
18. 

LaGrauge — -Friday. 
Kinston — Saturday. 
Newport — Third Sunday. 
Morehead City— Monday night. 
Marshall burg— Tuesday" 
Hunt ing Quarter — Wednesday. 
Cedar Island— Thursday. 
Brethren can arrange time of day 
for services. 



ELDER J. E. ADAMS. 

Dunn— Wednesday night before the 
1st Sunday in March. 

Mingo — Tuesday. 

Ilornett— Sat. and 1st Sunday. 

Seven Mile— Tuesday. 

Reedy Prong— Wednesday and 
Thursday. 

Hickory Grove — Sat. and 2nd Sun- 
day. 

Corinth — Tuesday. 
Oak Grove — Wednesday. 
Four Oaks — Thursday. 
Hannahs Creek — Sat. and 3rd Sun- 
day. 

Benson — at night. 
1 • t>* « a i d a— Moa 4 wf . 



166 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



WEBSTER'S 
NEW 
INTERNATIONAL. || 

DICTIONARY 

THE MERRIAM WEBSTER |j 

The ftnlv TJew linahrirJp'fiH din. I 



Primitive Zion Tuesday. 



If you wish to read a highly enter- 
taining book of about 80 pages — price 
50 cents — descriptive of characters 
both true and false, as set forth in the 
Bible, send for this book. 

ELDER P. W. KEENE, 
North Berwick: Main.-- 



Cured His 

Rupture 



Confederate Veteran Used the Brooks 
Rupture Appliance and Cured 
Himself at Home. 




Taken From a Photograph of Mr. Henry D„ 
Banks-R. F. D., No. 11— Commerce, Ga. 



Mr. Banks writes— "I am sound and so 
well that I can plow or do any kind of 
heavy work. I can truly say your Appli- 
ance has effected a permanent cure. I 
was in a terrible condition and had 
given up hope of ever being any better, 
if it hadn't been for your Appliance, I 
would never have got well. I am 70 
years old and served three years in 
Eekle'a Artillery of Oglethorpe Co. I 
hope God will reward you for the good 
you are doing to suffering humanity." 

Brooks' Appliance, the modern scien- 
tilic invention, the wonderful discovery 
that makes life worth living, for rup- 
tured people, will be sent on trial. No 
springs or hard pads. Has automatic air 
cushions. Binds and draws the broken parts 
together as you would a broken limb. No 
salves. No lies. Durable, cheap. Sent on 
trial to prove it. Full information and book 
on rupture, mailed free. Write today, 
c. E. Brooks. 2023B State St., Marshall, 
Miok., r.S.A. 



tionary in many years. 

Contains the pith and essence 
of an authoritative library. 
Covers every field of knowl- 
edge. An Encyclopedia in a 
single book. 

The Only Dictionary with the 
New Divided JPags. 

400,000 Words;. 27C0 Pages. 
6000 Illustrations. Cost nearly 
half a million dollars. 



Let us tsll you about this n:ost j 
remarkable single volume. | 




Send us your printing. Work done 
neatly and promptly. P. D. Q. 



Feather Bed Bargains 



S*i hern IWh vani \;;\<m Co. Dept. G Greensboro, N. C. 

1'. s. U\h\ ;. r,.| :,„.] < in is fc-nt with >ourroply^w< 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



1G7 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. R for the Nerves. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

CONNERSVILLE, IND., 

R. No. 1, Box G., 

Agents Wanted. 



NOTICE. 

Bro. W. R. Dodd. Whitmell, Va., 
lias kindly offered to send in subscrip- 
tions for- The Landmark, and those 
desiring to subscribe or renew their 
subscription can give him the money. 
A receipt card -w ill be mailed to each 
direct for amount paid. 

P. D. G. 



An Only Daughter 

Relieved of Consumption 

When death was hourly expected, all remedies 
having failed, and Dr. II. James was experiment- 
ing with the many herbs of Calcutta, he acci- 
dentally made a preparation which cured his 
only child oi Consumption. He has proved 
to the world that ( .>n.-.,nipuun can bo positive- 
ly and permanently cured. The doctor now 
- I pe i ri is king two 2-cent 

stamps to pay expenses. This herb also 
cues Nirht Sweats. Kiiw-a at the stomach and 
will break up a fresh cold in twenty-four hours. 
Address Craddock & Co- Philadelphia, 
Pa- naming this paper. 



REQUEST. 

We are in need of money to pay ex- 
penses. While war is raging in the 
Last we need money as much as if 
there were no war. .We can help each 
other by paying debts. Please send 
on what \s due on the Landmark, and 
iei each one pay his debts, as far as 
possible, and this will help to relieve 
the distress. 

P. D. G. 




FOR INFORMATION. 



For information and for reference 
we would be pleased to have a Minute 
of every Primitive Baptist Association 
in America and will thank the Clerks 
of the various Associations to forward 
one to me at their earliest possible 
convenience. 




MNIflWYBEBDiNii C jfn'i'A.i J^.I'ko Chr.rloUe.N.' C. 



MOORE'S MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Last summer my health became 
very poor. I went to Moore's Miner- 
al Springs, in Stokes County, N. C, 
remaining there about 12 days, I re- 
turned home well. 

This water acts on the blood, the 
skin, the bowe'ls, kidneys, stomach, 
catarrh, &c. 

T gladly recommend this water to 
the sick. Hotel open winter and sum- 
mer. Water shipped from Rural Hall, 
N. C, at $1.50 per case of 12 half gal- 
lons and cases to be returned in 30 
days. 

P. D. GOLD. 



S«md «« your Jab Printing. 



Send us your Job Printing. 



168 



HOW SHIVAR mineral water 

RELIEVES RHEUMATISM 

According to the standard medical 
books, Rheumatism is not a germ dis- 
ease but is the result of imperfect nu- 
trition. The food is either imperfect- 
ly digested or imperfectly assimilat- 
ed. Poisons accumulate and these ir- 
ritate and inflame the delicate lin- 
ings of the joints, the heart and other 
organs. To cure Rheumatism it is 
therefore necessary to stop the forma- 
tion of these poisons and get rid of 
those already formed. 

The celebrated Shivar Mineral Wa- 
ter acts on the stomach and kidneys. 
It corrects the digestion and washes 
out the poisons through the kidneys. 
This is the opinion of physicians who 
who prescribe it. If you suffer with 
rheumatism, dyspepsia, Indigestion, 
gall stones, disease of the kidneys, 
bladder or liver, uric acid poisoning, 
or any condition due to impure blood, 
read the following letter, then sign 
it, enclose the amount and mail it. 
Only two out of a hundred, on the 
average, report no benefit. 
Shivar Springs, 

Box 55M, Shelton, S C. 
Gentlemen: 

I accept your guarantee offer and 
enclose herewith two dollars for ten 
gallons of Shivar Mineral Water. I 
agree to give it a fair trial, in accor- 
dance with Instructions contained in 
booklet you will send, and If it fails 
to benefit my case you agree to re- 
fund the price in full upon receipt of 
the two empty demijohns which I 
agree to return promptly. 

Name 

Addres3 

Shipivin- Point 

(Please write distinctly.) 

Note: — The advertising manager of 
Z ion's Landmark is personally ac- 



quainted with Mr. Shivar. Y»a mm 
no risk whatever -in accepting his of- 
f r. I have personally witnessed the 
remarkable eurative power of tki» 
Water in a very serious case. 



§ DROPSY KLT^r.%Sto, 
and short breath' often eives entire relief 
in 15 to 25 days. Trial treatment sent fr.. 
DH. THOMAS E.GREEN, Successorto 
DR. H. H. 6REENS SONS, Box H, Chatsworth, li. 

Cancer Cured at the Kellam Hospital. 

The record of tha Kel'am Hospital 
is without parallel in history, having 
cured without the uce of the Knife, 
Acids, X-Ray or Radium, over ninety 
per cent, of the many hundreds of 
sufferers from Cancer which it ham 
treated during the past eighteen 
years. We want ©very man and wom- 
an in the United States to know what 
we are doing. KELLAM HOSPITAL, 
1617 W. Main St., Richmond, Va. 
Write for literature. 



IS EPILEPSY CONQUERED? 

New Jersey Physician Said to Have 
Many Cures to His Credit. 

Red Bank, N. J., (Special)— Ad- 
vices from every direction fully con- 
firm previous reports that the re- 
markable treatment for epilepsy be- 
ing administered by the consulting 
physician of the Kline Laboratories, 
of this city, is achieving wonderful 
results. Old and stubborn cases have 
been greatly benefited and many pa- 
tients claim to have been entirely 
cured. 

Persons suffering from epilepsy 
should write at once to Kline Labor- 
atories, Branch 63, Red Bank, N. J., 
for a supply of the remedy, which is 
being distributed gratuitously. 

LADIES S I OOOllEWARD! ISFiF S3 

Successful "Monthly" Compound. Safely relieves some 

days. 6 '^o harm! pain or'infe'rferenMwfth^ Vlail 
|1. 60; noubleSrrentfh82.Cft BOOKLET FREE.Wrltetoriav. 

Dr. J. R. Southington Remedy Co., 615 Main St. Kansas City, Mo. 



ZION'S LApiMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 
AT 

"WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Primitive or Old School Baptist . 

TOL. XLVII. WILSON, N. C, MARCH 1, 1915. NO. 8. 




P. D. GOLD, Editor Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Asso. Editor Floyd, Va. 



$1.50 PER YEAR. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 



"Ask for the eld path* where is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the 
ancient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and 
strengthened by its cords of love. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of mem, 
and regard only the Bible as tuie standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey 
Jesus, the King in the Holy Hill of Zion, keeping them- 
selves unspotted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith is God* 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, th« 
blessed Comforter. 

KOTXOBI 

When a subscriber desires his paper ehanged he should 
state plainly both the old and new poetofiees. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what Is due, and also 
giaie bis postefiiee. 

Let each subscriber pay for his paper in advance if fea- 
sible, and when he renews give the same name it has been 
going in, unless he wishes it ahanged, then he should state 
both the old and the new names. 

If the money sent has net been receipted, please inform 
me of it. When yon can alwcys send money by money order 
or eheek, or draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Bach subscriber can tell the tame to whieh he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers ef gospel truth are invited to write for it — if 
so impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peaee be multiplied to all lovers 
eX truth. 

All communications, business letters, remittances of ?. 0 
Eferders, money, drafts, etc., should be sent to 



P. D GOLD. Wason, 91. C 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSR OF JESUS CHRIST. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Elder P. D. Gold: — Dear brother iu 
Christ, if one so unworthy as I am may 
address you as such. I have an article 
written by Bro. L. H. Hardy, which 
has been of great comfort and conso- 
lation to me and I think if published 
will be a great feast to the household 
of faith, therefore I send it to you 
with his permission for publication, 
hoping it will be a great joy to the 
readers of the Landmark. 

Dear Brother Gold, I beg your 
prayers while ai, the throne of grace 
and may the Lord abundantly bless 
you in all of your labors, is my hum- 
ble prayer. 

Your unworthy sister, 

ANNIE W. GILLIK1N. 

Lupton, N. C. 

Mrs. Annie W. Gillikin, 

Lupton, N. C. 
My Dear Sister: — I reckon you 
think that I have fully forgotten my 
promise to write to you, but I assure 
you that that is not the cause of my 
long neglect. My necessities are such 
that I have been compelled to spend 
my spare days at work to meet our 
expenses and therefore I have not had 
an opportunity to write, and even to- 
jlay I could not do so if I were able to 
work. • The subjects, I believe, on 
which 3>-ou requested my views are 
about as follows: 



1st. Is there any change in this 
mortal body after death? 

2nd. Is tliere any resurrection of 
the same? and thirdly, is there any 
judgment after death? 

In writing on these subjects of the 
christian hope, I hope to be able to 
write on the two points of the resur- 
rection and the judgment for t'uese are 
the two doctrinal points which are 
herein embraced. 

According to the understanding 
which I have of the scriptures the res- 
urrection and the judgment are al- 
ready fulfilled in our Lord Jesus 
Christ and as an evidence of this as a 
sacred truth our God is manifesting, 
and will manifest the same unto each 
of His children individually 1 ere and 
hereafter, the final deliveraiu e being 
revealed in their final resurrection ia 
the glorious likeness of our glorified 
Lord. 

Jesus said unto Martha, "I am the 
resurrection, and the life." Herein is 
revealed a most precious truth. He 
not only was the resurrection of Laz- 
arus and such as he was, but it was 
the same as to say to her, "I am your 
resurreetio:, from your present 
trouble. '' Thus His iiower was not 
only over the death that had preyed 
on the mortal body, but also over the 
trouble that was perplexing her mind 
at that very time and just as sure as 
her brother should rise from the dead, 
just so sure should she rise from her 



170 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



troubles. Even so as her brother in 
his state of death had no power over 
death and could not rise from the dead 
neither had she any power over her 
troubled mind to raise it up above its 
then troubled state and place it in a 
state of peace. "1 am the resurrection 
and the life" to your brother and to 
you. She could no more comprehend 
the one than she could the other, 
neither could she any more compre- 
hend what should be done to her than 
Lazarus could, what should be done to 
him for in her state she was just as 
dead to the joys of her resurrection as 
Lazarus was in his state. This thing 
had to be revealed to each of them in 
the very act of raising them up from 
their present condition. Thus each of 
them was powerless and the living 
just as dependent as the dead. 

Shall we not learn from this that 
Christ WILL NOT BE but that He 
NOW IS the resurrection and the 
life? Yes, have we not so learned 
Christ in our past experience? How 
do we know that Christ is risen from 
the dead and become the first fruits 
of them that slept ? Have we not 
learned it by that resurrection being 
worked in us to raise us above all our 
troubles? From what source does de- 
liverance come to us in our deepest 
troubles? Is it not through the resur- 
rection of Christ that Ave are deliver- 
ed? Here He made an end of sin and 
put all our enemies under His feet and 
assured final deliverance to all who 
were in Him. He learned obedience 
to these things by the things which He 
suffered and He delighted to suffer 
and endure all things for the elect's 
sake. 

Had we no troubles, no trials here 
we would not look back with joy that 
Christ suffered and rose again from 
the dead, neither would we experience 
any deliverance from our troubles as 
we journey on our way for every de- 
liverance from sin and trouble is but 



a renewed evidence that Christ rose 
from the dead and rose for us. Thus 
we have the resurrection taught us in 
our daily experience and are witnesses 
to the fact that the DEAD SHALL 
RISE. Where is our hope? We do 
not hope for that which we have, but 
by that which we have already re- 
ceived we hope for that which is to 
come. Thus he who preaches that the 
dead shall not rise preaches against 
the glorious end of all christian hope 
and should not be allowed to preach in 
the churches of the saints. 

From whence came this blessed 
hope? Was it not given us in our 
glorious deliverance from the curses 
of God's righteous law because of our 
exceeding sinfulness? Yes, and it has 
been renewed to us in each trial and 
temptation when the Lord has re- 
vealed to us that His everlasting arm 
was still underneath, that our hope 
was still an anchor of the soul, both 
sure and steadfast, it has been tried 
by many a tempest as the storm beats 
and the high seas Irish on the little 
vessel and she sinks, almost founders 
and the smoking spray grows so thick 
as to form a cloud entirely shutting 
out from our view the face of our 
precious "Redeemer, our Sun of right- 
eousness and we begin to feel, "Sure- 
ly T am gone at last, I am beyond hope, 
surely this will be the last." As we 
thus wrestle and are tempest tossed a 
voice, yes, a sweet voice is heard in 
the midst of our fear, "Peace, be still." 
is the sound and at that voice, sweet, 
gentle as it is to us, yet it commands 
all the powers of hell and the devil's 
forces fall before it and hope prevails. 
Again we march onward with the eye 
set on our resurrection and our life 
Thus we are appointed to suffer and 
endure trials here and try the strength 
of the love of our Beloved and to karri 
how near He is to us and that He is 
our only hope. It is ourselves who 
suffer thus here and it is ourselves who 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



171 



shall enjoy the blessings for which 
we hope. We suffer now in this mor- 
tality but in the resurrection of this 
body there will not be any mortality 
for it shall be swallowed up of life 
and all done away forever. This nat- 
ural will have died and the spiritual 
will be our habitation. This change 
Avill uot come to us AFTER the resur- 
rection but IN the resurrection for 
we shall be raised up like unto the 
glorious body of Christ. 

There will be a separation in the 
resurrection as a shepherd divideth 
the sheep from the goats for the 
DEAD SN CHRIST SHALL RISE 
FIRST. 

This separation is being gradually 
revealed to us here in our trials of life 
but shall there be fully manifested in 
the final separation, for all who rise in 
Christ shall be like Him and shall be 
caught up to meet Him in the air and 
be forever with the Lord. 

2ndly — The Judgment. 

What shall I say to this since both 
these are so much joined in one as to 
be almost inseparable? 

Just like the resurrection the Lord 
is also the Judgment. 

Our Lord said, "He that believeth 
on Him is not condemned, but he that 
believeth not is condemned already, 
because he hath not believed in Uie 
name of the only begotten Son of 
God." John 3:18. 

The word "Condemned" in both 
places means JUDGED. This shows to 
us that this point just as the point of 
the resurrection, is complete in Go.l 
and only remains to be manifested 1o 
us by His spirit in revealing what ouc 
Lord has done for us in saving us 
from the condemnation of God's holy 
law of divine justice. There must bo 
v a trial before a conviction and a con- 
viction before a passing of a senteuce 
Now when is it that the people of God 
are convicted? Is it not when they 
see and feel themselves sinners in the 



sight of God? Truly so. Then are lhey 
not at that time arraigned before tho 
court of God to answer before Him 
who is judge of all the eartn to 3-eeeive 
their reward according to their wo. ks? 
(Matt. 26:27.) To have rendered to 
them according to their deeds? (Rom. 
2 :6. I To give account of hims-.'f to 
God? Rom. 14:12.) And to appear be- 
fore the judgment seat of Christ, that, 
every one may receive 'he things 
(done) in (his) body, accord in? to 
that he hath done, whether v it be) 
gopd or bad? 2 Cor. 5:10. Yes here we 
are arraigned and here we must be 
tried. The whole court is set up in 
our hearts, there is the Judge, (no 
jury is needed) the witness and the ar- 
rested criminal. The witness testifies 
before the Judge, every word he 
speaks is true, undeniably true; the 
trembling convict stands confessing 
to each word that goes out against 
him, he denies, no, not a word for his 
heart is open and he sees that each 
word is written there in the wilful acts 
of his Life. There lie stands guilty and 
trembling before the Judge who he 
know s cannot do wrong nor suffer His 
justice to be infringed upon. Justice 
shines so brightly that every thing he 
can think of becomes a witness against 
him and all nature seems to be draped 
in napurning because there is such a vile 
transgressor against such a holy law. 
What must this convict do? Oh, that 
is the question! "How should man be 
just with God?" Job 9:2. He can 
see no wajf of escape. To confess guilt 
is to confess judgment and to confess 
judgment, if it be meeted out, is to 
consent to my eternal death. To this 
I am not willing but I know it is just 
and I must confess, how can I do 
otherwise for I am already such a sin- 
ner and shall I lie to this Judge who 
cannot be deceived. No, I AM 
GUILTY is the word, but LORD 
HAVE MERCY ON ME is the rising 
petition. Is there no one in the court 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



to plead for this guiuy, trembling con- 
vict now all stript and naked before 
this Holy Judge ? 

Behold right in the midst of the 
court just immediately between this 
guilty, confessing sinner and that Just 
and Holy Judge there stands a cross 
arid on it One expanded with His 
hands and His feet pierced with nails 
and a gore of blood and water pour- 
ing out of His side, His eyes look on 
this trembling sinner and lie says to 
the Judge, ■"Behold I and this child 
whom Thou hast given me, ' : and to 
the trembling one, "Thy sins, which 
are many, are all forgiven thee" At 
these words the stream of precious 
blood go?s all over this sinner and the 
destroying angel passes over him and 
he is safe. More than that his sins 
are gone so that instead of that con- 
demning frown which just a few min- 
utes ago lie so much dreaded, there 
sits on the brow of the just Judge a 
sweet and pleasant smile of acceptance 
and an open bosom of love flows out 
to him and he is made to feel the free 
justification of the Bleeding One 
spread round about him as he is made 
in rapture to proclaim "Is this for me, 
so vile a wretch?" but he is assured 
that he is now a new creature and old 
things are passed away. Faith springs 
up and is in lively exercise so that 
with all his heart he believes that 
"Jesus died for me." But who is this 
Jesus and why should His death have 
such a glorious effect on such a cor- 
rupt sinner as to so fully and freely 
justify him before such a righteous 
and all-seeing Judge? Let us look af- 
ter Him a little, for if a word from 
Him has so glorious an effect on guilty 
ones may I not hope to appear justified 
in this holy court? Who is He? 

One declares that He is the Mighty 
God, the Everlasting Father and yet 
that He is a Son. A son must be be- 
gotten and born. How can it be true 
tkat ene can !»• th« Mighty God am«l 



yet at the same time be begotten of 
Him and be born a man of flesh and 
blood? Truly great is the mystery of 
God as well as Godliness. This holy 
intercession is given to be Head over 
all things to the church, which is His 
body, the fulness of Him that filleth 
all in all. (Eph. 1:22-23.) and * * * 
which is the Head (even) Christ, from 
whom the whole body fitly joined to- 
gether, &c. (Eph. 4:15-16.) He is the 
Head of the body, the church. (Col. 
1:18.) And not holding the Head, from 
which all the body by joints and bands 
having nourishments ministered, and 
knit together, increaseth with the in- 
crease of God. (Col. 2:1D.) 

Now we've the mystery of the Judg- 
ment and of the justification of the 
family of God. Was not our Lord a 
man? Truly so. A man of flesh and 
blood, born of a woman just as one of 
us. As a man must He not appear at 
the judgment seat of God or in the 
court of divine justice? Truly so. But 
for whom must He appear for He 
knew no sin. He was not a transgres- 
sor of the law of divine Justice nor of 
any other law. Why then must He ap- 
pear at the Judgment? 

"All we, like sheep, have gone 
astray : we have turned every one to 
his own way; and the Lord hath laid 
on Him the iniquity of us all." Is. 53:6. 
"In all their aifliction He was afflict- 
ed, and the angel of His presence saved 
them. In His love and in His pity He 
redeemed them ; and He bare them, 
and carried them all the days of old." 
Is. 63:9. 

"Who His own self bare our sins in 
His own body on the tree, that we, be- 
ing dead to sin, should live unto right- 
eousness : by whose stripes we were 
healed." 1st Peter 2 :24. 

These quotations fully answer the 
questions. 

He is the Head of the church just as 
His natural head was the head of His 
natural »ai at ¥• «uff«-r««l in Ms 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



173 



body it was because of our sins and 
He bare thein in His body, the church. 
Thus we see our vital Head suffering 
for us, for us standing in the judg- 
ment, receiving the sentence, suffering 
the penalty. The debt is paid, justice 
is satisfied, Gods people justified, 
taken out from under the law and 
put unde,- grace. Just as the resurrec- 
tion is working in us and being daily 
manifested in all our trials, even so is 
the Judgment and Christ the Lord is 
ever appearing as our Intercessor, 
clearing those for whom He died. This 
is a continual or progressive work in 
us as \vc are coming up out of 'the 
wilderness leaning on our Beloved who 
carrieth us and our burdens too and 
while we are continually writing bit- 
ter things against ourselves, yet He 
assures us that our sins were all im- 
puted to Iiim and He was judged for 
them. Just as our sins became His, 
His righteousness lias become ours. So 
the Lord imputed to us righteousness 
without works. Thus we see that as 
our vital Head Avas judged for our 
gins, and as the Head and the body are 
al] one perfect Man and He receives 
the things done in His body we also 
shall receive the same, for as our sins 
became His so His works have become 
ours and we are now judged in His 
works, for His glorious robe is spread 
round about us and all our iniquities 
are covered. 

The full manifestation of this matter 
we will receive in the resurrection 
when we shall hear the glad sound, 
"Come ye blessed of my Father, inher- 
it the kingdom prepared for you before 
the foundation of the world." 

The judgment of the righteous will 
have ended and they enter into rest 
from all their sorrows. 

After these the wicked shall be 
raised up into the resurrection of dam- 
nation (for they are condemned, 
judged) already and shall hear the 
judgment »enfrenct "Rtpart frem me 



ye workers of iniquity into everlasting 
fire prepared for the devil and his an- 
gels/' 

This will be the end of their judg- 
ment and the end of all tilings here, 
but the joys of the redeemed shall be 
forever with Christ and the punish- 
ment of the wicked forever with their 
father. 

Hear Sister, you requested me to 
write through the Landmark but 1 
will send this to you and after you 
have read it, if you see fit, you may 
send it to Brother Cold. 

Your brother in hope, 

L. H. HARDY. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Cold: 

1 enclose the last letter Mr. Outter- 
bridge ever wrote to you. 

1 am sure he intended to re-write it 
before signing his name, but 1 think it 
is finished. You can dispose of it as 
you think best. 

If you do not publish it please send 
it back to me. 1 am very feeble, not 
able to be up much of the time. 

With love and best wishes for you 
and Sister Gold, 1 am your sister in 
Christ, 

SUSAN OUTTERBR1DGE. 

THE LETTER. 

Dear Brother Gold :— 1 have con- 
cluded to answer your much esteemed 
letter, by giving you some of my 
thoughts on the following : 

"Whom he loveth he chasteneth." 

Nations are to God but as dust in 
the balance. He does as he will with 
his own. He deals the rod, first, light- 
ly, then heavier unto humility and re- 
pentance : otherwise destruction is in- 
evitable. Thus it was with national 
Israel, a nation peculiarly favored of 
God. Then let other nations beware. 
Yea, our own nation that has been so 
highly favor«d of Israel's God, from' 



174 ZION'S I 

time immemorial, and like the Jewish 
nation, has with a stiff neck and feet of 
wickedness trampled under their un- 
hallowed feet the rich boon bestowed 
upon them through the price of blood. 
"Afflictions though they seem severe 

Even so with spiritual Israel. 

The sinner in his mad career, like 
Saul of Tarsus, receives, in mercy, the 
arrows of conviction, and is brought to 
a happy deliverance from the bondage 
of sin and ruin. "Sorrow endureth 
for a night, but joy cometh in the 
morning." 

J low placid the waves after the 
storm, how sweet the rest after toiling 
all night, and how joyous when the 
Sun of righteousness arises with heal- 
ing in his wings. Such souls die to sin 
and are made alive to holiness. They 
are now no longer under the law of 
.Moses, but under the law of Christ. 

Now eomes the conflict, and as Paul, 
they realize that when they would do 
good, evil is present with them. 

Satan ever besets and is ready to 
destroy, but there is a power within 
that is as an anchor to the soul, sure 
and steadfast, entering to that within 
the veil, where the fore-runner hath, 
for us entered. No chastening is at 
present joyous, but grievous, but af- 
terwards yields the peaceable fruits of 
righteousness to them that are exer- 
cised thereby. Our Father knows best 
what we need, either in supplies or 
chastisements. His love and care ac- 
companies every stroke inflicted to 
save from ruin, and to constrain to 
duty. He is with his children in every 
a miction to deliver, saying, " I am 
God and change not, therefore ye sons 
of Jacob are not constimed." 

David, a man after God's own heart, 
was smitten and afflicted, and ex- 
claimed, Though I walk through the 
valley of the shadow of death I will 
fear no evil, for thou art with me, thy 
rod and thy staff do comfort me. The 



iNDMARK. 

rod, to afflict, and the staff to support. 
Hence the comfort and joy with every 
deliverance, with increase of faith and 
trust. Job could say, in all his afflic- 
tions, though he slay me, yet will I 
trust him. 

Let the child of God be well assured 
that when he is chastened the Father 
who afflicts is near, yea says the hymn 
of promise 

"Fear not I am with thee 0 be not dis- 
mayed, 

I am thy God and will still give thee 
aid. 

I'll strengthen thee, help thee, and 

cause thee to stand 
Upheld by my righteous omnipotent 

hand. ' ' 

In the case of the Hebrew children, 
He, in the person of his Son, was in the 
fiery furnace wHh them, their fetters 
were burned off, and they set free. 
Thus it is in some form or deg 'ee, with 
His children now, and in all ages of the 
world. 

Again says the hymn, 



In every condition, in sickness, in 
, health 

In poverty's vale or abounding in 
Avealth, 

At home and abroad, on the land or on 
sea, 

As thy days may demand shall they 
strength ever be. 
Dear Brethren Gold and Lester, now 
nearing my 90th year, and doubtless 
near my departure from this mundane 
system, to realize, I hope, the happy 
beyond, and finding my physical pow- 
ers are now failing, therefore do not 
get out as of yore, to meet and mingle 
with the saints of God. I am much en- 
gaged in reading and gleaning, to gath- 
er evidences of my interest in the aton- 
ing blood and righteousness of Jesus, 
and as I cannot see, hear, and speak 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



175 



to the saints I desire to write a few 
thoughts of the things pertaining to 
the christian life. 

REMARKS. 

The above deeply interesting letter 
was written by brother Stephen Out- 
terbridge. 

He had lived to enter upon his 91st 
year. I was at his home the night he 
passed away. 

How sweet to me, was the life of 
this loving model brother. 

He had lived as long as he desired to 
live, and it seemed too as well as any 
oue could live. How humble, peace- 
ful, gentle he was. 

He died in the last week of last Jan- 
uary without a struggle or groan. 

How peaceful were his last days, 
and it seems to me, all his days. 

P. D. G. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

I enclose you a good letter from 
Sister Nannie Edwards of LaOrange, 
Ga., which I wish you to publish in 
Zion's Landmark. 

Write this notice for me : I am not 
able to write much as I have been eon- 
fined to my room for five months. I 
have little use of myself, not being able 
to stand up without holding to some- 
thing, can walk but little even with 
aid of a stick and can't lie in bed and 
sleep, but have to spend day and night 
in an old chair. 

My sufferings are more than tongue 
can tell or pen describe and I do not 
improve any at all. Will you and 
readers remember me in your prayers. 
I can't write more. 

H. J. REDD. 

Avondale, Ala. 

Dear Brother Redd: — I received a 
card from you last Fall saying you 
were in wretched health and it is be- 



yond expression to tell you how much 
it grieved us. 1 have thought of you 
many times, and prayerfully so, that 
you might still be restored and be 
spared many years yet, to preach the 
unsearchable riches of God's grace 
and His wonderful power in saving 
poor, fallen man. I know He has en- 
abled you to tell it most beautifully to 
the comfort of His believing children, 
and 1 sincerely hope, if it can be con- 
sistent with His will, that some day 
you will be enabled to tell the old 
sweet story again. 

There is nothing too hard for God to 
do, and I am fully prepared to say it. 
For when skilled physicians had tried 
all they could to relieve me and all 
earthly help failed, it pleased my 
heavenly Father to relieve me 1o such 
an extent that I am able to be up some 
and sit among the assembly of the 
saints. Now some have asked me, was 
it faith ? No, indeed, for it never oc- 
curred to me during all those years 
that I would ever walk again, and my 
daily prayer was for grace and recon- 
ciliation, and I believe I was as much 
reconciled to suffering as mortal could 
be. But one thing I did know, that 
Ciod had all power in heaven and on 
earth and I was expecting the sum- 
mons any time just as 1 am today. But 
to my Avonderful surprise he raised me 
f"oin my bed. 

One day while mediating on His 
goodness and thinking what a strange 
thing it all was, that I could sit up 
again, these words came to me most 
forcibly: "And the Spirit of Ood 
moved upon the face of the waters." 
At that time it seemed to apply to my 
ease and rjcn lingers with me to-day. 

"We all often speak of you and how 
sound in the faith you have always 
been and how glad we would be to see 
you and hear you preach once more. 

T guess you know that Vera is mar- 
ried. She and "Roy visited Riverview 
last Fall. Vera thinks a great deal of 



176 



Z-ION'S LAN©MARK. 



your daughter ana your grandchildren. 

How we wish you could have been 
al our Association which convened 
here in October. The following 
preachers were present: Elders 
Thompson, Cook, Bagwell, Swain, All- 
mon, Fuller, Parish, Young, Phillips, 
Prather, Caldwell and our paster Elder 
SatterAvhite. Elder Swain was once 
among the progressives, bu + the Lord 
brought him out from them and he 
delivered one of the most powerful 
discourses on Sunday morning at the 
Association I ever heard. The aud- 
ience seemed to be spell-bound, and 
I thanked God from the depths of my 
soul for such a gift. 

The progressives here have built a 
modern church and placed an organ 
in it and call on other denominations 
to exercise. Before the progressive 
spirit got in the church all worshipped 
in a little chapel, but when the division 
came they held the house, and our lit- 
tle band bought a little meeting house 
from another denomination and it has 
taken us nearly three years to pay for 
it. But it is paid for at last and let us 
praise God with our whole heart. My 
dear brother, nearly all this money was 
raised by subscription. I received 
over $30.00 from brethren and sisters 
in Canada. In all, I received over 
$100 from between the two coasts. 

After we were left without a meet- 
ing house we had a little conference 
here in my home. Elder Whatly was 
our pastor and with prayerful hearts 
we went forth trusting in God to bless 
us. You have never seen an humbler 
band than we have, and I hope you 
will pray that we may ever be found 
at each others feet. 

"We have had the most inclement 
weather I have ever seen. I have 
spent most of the time reading the 
bible and the "Signs." Some of the 
old volumes have so appealed to me 
that I never get tired (in spirit) read- 
ing them. 



Give my love to your dear wife and 

children, and tell them may God bless 
them and give you and them renewed 
grace and strength every day. I stay 
in my room most all the time not hav- 
ing stood on the ground in 3 months. I 
was not able to attend the Association 
but two days, just being up then from 
a spell of sickness. 1 have to lure a 
conveyance when I attend service and 
it is very expensive. 

Mack often speaks of you. Bob has 
not been very well for some time. 
Brother Ed. and Sister Lizzie are well. 
They live just across the fence from 
us. 

1 know you are tired of having read 
this, and I am tired writing and must 
rest. 

May the dear Saviour be your con- 
stant guest and give you day by day 
such blessings as will redound to your 
good and to His glory. 

Yours in afflictions, 

NANNIE EDWARDS. 

LaGrange, Ga. 



OUR HELP FROM ABOVE. 

Eld. P. D. Gold, Dear Brother:— 
Please publish the neclosed letter for 
me. It is from my niece and was a 
great comfort to me. She is confessing 
her great helplessness which is the on- 
ly thing that will make us realize that 
God has all power. 

Your brother in hope, 

C. A. DAVIS. 

Kernersville, N. C. 

Mr. C. A. Davis, Dear Uncle: — If 
you will pardon a poor, vile wretch 
for intruding on your time I will try 
and write you a few lines. It seems 
I must tell some one of my feelings or 
die and I trust the impression is of the 
Lord. I know of myself I can do noth- 
ing — not even breathe — and I feel that 
my life is in his hands and that he has 
protected and cared for me all 
through life and had I ten thousand 



/ION'S LANBMARK. 



177 



tongues I couldn't praise him enough. 

J wanted to talk to you the night 
you were here but felt so poor, weak 
and ignorant that 1 thought you 
wouldn't care to hear anything 1 had 
to say, but 1 trust since that time I 
have been made willing to say, "Thy 
will not mine be done." 

It seems to me of late that my time 
here is short and 1 have a great desire 
to be baptized and have a home with 
you people; but surely you couldn't 
have fellowship for such a vile wretch 
as I feel to be. 

"Like one alone I feel to be, 
Oh, is there any one like me." 

It seems all my people have forsaken 
me and that 1 have no home or 
friends. It seems 1 am traveling all 
alone in this cold and unfriendly 
world. {Some times I think it is all 
imagination and will throw it aside 
and will enjoy the things of this 
world, but it follows me wherever I 
go and I can't enjoy the things I once 
did. 

The only enjoyment I have is Avhen 
1 can sit under the blessed sound of 
the gospel although 1 don't feel worthy 
to go to God's house or be with His 
people, but 1 have a great aesire to be 
with them where they live. 1 Avant to 
live with them and 1 want their God 
to be my God. 

1 have written this for relief of 
mind hoping you will cast the mantle 
of charity over all imperfections and 
when it goes well with you remember 
poor unworthy me. 

Your unworthy niece, 

BESSIE HAYWORTH.' 
I light Point, N. C. 



Send us your Minutes and Book and 
Job work. We do it with neatness and 
despatch. 

P. D. GOLD PUB. CO. 

Wilson, N. 6. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



"Remove not the ancient landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



P. D. QOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



VOL. XLVI1I. NUMBER 8. 



Entered at the postofi'ice at Wilson as 
second class matter. 



WILSON, N. C, MARCH 1, 1915. 



EDITORIAL 

JOB. 

One of the strong characters of bible 
portrayal was Job. The most wonder- 
ful and the most wicked character ap- 
peal- on this arena, the most wise and 
the most subtle character are intro- 
duced, the Lord God and Satan, three 
friends Avho claimed to come to com- 
fort Job, and Elihu appears as one 
that must needs speak with reproof, 
yet Avhose Avords seemed as an anoint- 
ing with promise of healing. 

Job is introduced as the greatest 
man of the east in the land of Uz. He 
is of the famous race of Shem, and 
according to admission of Satan was 
hedged and enriched by the Lord. 

He was earnestly Avatchful and at- 
tentive to the service of the Lord. For 
on the feast days of his wealthy sons 
he would offer a sacrifice for each of 
them, saying, lest my sons may have 
cursed God in their hearts. This did 
Job continually. How watchful and 
diligent in business lie was, a noble il- 
lustration of the anxiety of a parent 
for the good behaviour of his children. 



178 



ZIONS LANDMARK. 



Bui never perhaps did man have a 

malicous or cunning. 

Others beside the suns of God pre- 
sent themselves before the Lord, for 
Satan also presented himself before 
the Lord, when the Lord asked Satan 
from whence he eame, his reply was 
prompt, "From going to and fro in 
tin' earth, and from walking up and 
down in it." Further the Lord said, 
hast thou considered my servant Job, 
that there is none like him in the 
earth, a perfect and an upright man, 
one thai t'eareth God and escheweth 
evil.'" Satan of course "would con- 
sider a man so noted as that. Did 
Satan envy J obi Surely he had no 
kind thoughl or word, perfect and up- 
right as Job was. With words malig- 
nant and dark with foul hints of self- 
iishness he said. "Doth Job fear God 
for nought." As mueh as to say, it pays 
him to fear God. Thou hast hedged 
him about, and enriched him. Thou 
hast blessed the labor of his hands. 
Just touch him and he will curse thee 
to thy face. Satan does not see or 
know anything of love of truth. Satan 
said to the Lord God, put forth thy 
hand and touch all that he hath and he 
will curse thee to thy face. The Lord 
said unto Satan. Behold all that he 
hath is in thy power: only upon him- 
self put not forth thine hand. 

So Sal a n went forth from the pres- 
ence of the Lord. Satan does not en- 
joy the presence of the Lord. But what 
did he leave in the hand of Job? What 
was it he look not from Job? The lan- 
guage of Job showed that he had the 
propei' view of wealth, and where it 
came from. He worshipped God and 
said, "Naked came I out of my 
mother's womb, and naked shall 1 re- 
turn thither: the Lord gave and the 
Lord hath taken away: blessed be the 
name of the Lord."' In all this Job 
sinned not, nor charged God foolishly. 
What a bright record was this? Thus 



Oar Satan is proven to be a liar. 

Satan according to his own report 
of himself is always doing the same 
thing, "From going to and fro in the 
earth, and from walking up and down 
in it." Still the question comes up, 
hast thou considered my servant Job- 
none like him, and although thou 
movest me against him without cause, 
still he holds on to his integrity. Sat- 
an "s answer is, all that a man hath will 
he give for his life. But put forth 
thine hand now and touch his bone 
and his flesh, and he will curse thee to 
thy face. The Lord said to Satan, Be- 
hold he is in thy hand: but save his 
life. Then Satan went forth from the 
presence of the Lord, and smote Job 
with sore boils from the sole of his 
foot to his crown. 

Satan does his dreadful work of 
smiting when the Lord is away, or 
when he is not there, and when the 
Lord does not shine upon us. 

While protesting his innocency, and 
holding on to his integrity, but over- 
whelmed with suffering and desiring 
death, and cursing the day of his 
birth he protested his innocence. 

He had been overwhelmed with ca- 
lamity. His friends hear of his down- 
fall, and hasten to his relief. When 
they behold his grief they remain sil- 
ent seven days and seven nights, sit- 
ting on the ground. They were so 
astonished they could not or did not 
speak. 

-lob was not angry: but his grief 
was inexpressible, and there was no 
relief for him. The bitterness of his 
anguish, while he w r as in the hands of 
Satan as his prisoner, and every pos- 
sible plague of evil was poured out 
upon him: such as accusations from 
his three friends that he was a de- 
ceiver, a pretender, that they had 
esteemed him as God's servant, but 
now God had overthrown him. God 
had found him out. Their theory was 
that God does not oppress, nor scourge 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



his own people, and God always hears 
the prayers of the innocent, and does 
vindicate the righteous, and now if he 
were innocent, and would pray to the 
Lord that God Avould hear him, and 
would vindicate him. Afflicted from 
foot to head with sore boils, his prop- 
erty all gone, his fair name soiled ami 
stained, and having become the by- 
word and song of the drunkards, his 
wife telling him to curse God and die, 
with no friend in heaven nor earth, 
and not one moment of ease, full of 
weariness and tossing to and fro, 
where could he go, what could he do? 

If the devil could have induced him 
to curse God and die then he could 
somewhat establish his charge that 
.lul> was hired, was paid to serve God, 
and that religion has its foundation 
in selfish uess. 

The contention between -lob and 
the three men that came to comfort 
him was so controled on their part 
that it added to his grief. Job was a 
pi edestinarian, while the others were 
not of that conviction. 

Jf men cannot agree in their views 
of religion, and have no points of fel- 
lowship then they will multiply words 
without profit to themselves. 

P. D. G. 



JOB. 

In the earlier days 'of Job's life the 
candle of the Lord's favor shone all 
night upon him, his steps were wash- 
ed with butter, and the refreshing 
dew lay all night upon his tabernacle. 

But what a change was wrought 
in him. His grief was heavier 
than the sand of the sea, and there 
was no hope of any deliverance for 
him. Turn which way he would it 
was desolation. His hope had perish- 
ed. The things his soul refused to 
touch had become his sorrowful meat. 
Naturally men love life and desire to 
live. But Job's desire was that God 
would destroy him. 



Whn 1 lie down 1 say when shall 1 
arise. Wearisome nights are appoint- 
ed me. 1 am full of tossings to and 
from until the morning. One that has 
never had such nights appointed him. 
such sorrow and bitterness of heart 
continually knows nothing of Jobs 
calamity, so that he was a burden to 
himself. 

Then answered Bildad the Sfcubite 
and said. (Job 8:8) "Doth God per- 
vert judgment, or doth the Almighty 
pervert justice.' If thy children have 
sinned against him. and he have east 
them away for their transgression if 
thou wouldst seek unto Cod betimes, 
and make thy supplication to the Al- 
mighty: if thou wert pure and up- 
right, surely now he would awake for 
thee, and make the habitation of thy 

righteousness prosperous. Though 
thy beginning was small, yet thy lat- 
ter end should greatly increase. ■"He- 
hold. God will not east away a perfect 
man, neither will he help the evil do- 
ers: - ' This was laying burdens upon 
afflicted Job that they woidd not 
touch with one of their little fingers. 
What comfort was there to Job in such 
teaching/ They took it for granted 
th&t Job had committed the greatest 
of sin. or God would not have cast 
him down so much. Yet said they 
if you were innocent, and would pray 
to God he would hear you. and would 
deliver vim. Hut there was no door 
of prayer open to Job. He knew not 
what to do, nor how to go. God giv- 
eth not account of any of his matters. 
Who can hinder him.' What he de- 
sireth that his soul doeth. "If I justi- 
fy myself mine own mouth shall con- 
demn me. If I say I am perfect it 
shall also prove me perverse. Though 
I were perfect, yet would I not know 
my soul : I would despise mv life," Job 
9 :20-21. 

What a helpless sinner, a hungry 
and thirsty soul, that knows not what 
to do nor where to go, one that has no 



180 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



strength, one that can do nothing, 
thirsts for help i'or the needy, and the 
lost one. Such a soul hungers for help 
from God. He desires a daysman, one 
that can show man how God is just 
and thr justitier of the ungodly that 
believes in Jesus, that is enabled to 
receive him as supplying every thing 
that the needy hungers for. But there 
is none present as a friend that can lay 
one liand on him and one on the Al- 
mighty, that can present his case to 
the Lord, furnishing a single word 
even to cause him to hope that there 
is mercy. There is no advocate, no 
daysman, no interpreter, no hope for 
him, and he seeks i'or present relief in 
the silent and gloom of death. When 
every avenue of hope perishes and des- 
olation possesses the soul how dread- 
ful is the easting down. 

P. D. G. 



JOB. 

"Is not this thy fears, thy confi- 
dence, thy hope, and the uprightness 
<-f thy ways?'' Job 4:6. 

Eliphaz the Temanite with the other 
two friends visit Job to comfort him. 
(After sitting down with him seven 
days and nights in silent astonishment 
;it his downfall. Job .opens his mouth 
and eurses the day of his birth, not 
only wishing he had never been born, 
but that the day of his birth should 
be blotted from memory and draped 
in sackcloth forever. He was seized 
with such horror that he wondered 
why he had ever lived. Why did he 
not perish in the womb? Such was 
the depth of his wretchedness. When 
these three companions hear this then 
they reply to him. First, Eliphaz 
speaks. If we essay to commune with 
thee wilt thou be grieved? but who 
can withhold himself from speaking? 
Then he reminds Job of having in- 
structed and comforted others in their 
sorrows. Thou hast uphold en him 
tkat wis falling, and thou hast 



strengthened the feeble knees. But 
now it is come on thee, and thou faint- 
est : it touchest thee and thou art 
troubled. Is this the kind of religion 
you have? Does it desert you when 
you most need it? If it were the 
right sort of faith would it not sup- 
port and comfort you in trial? Is not 
that one of the good things of the 
right sort of hope? Does it not prove 
that your hope is false, and that it 
tails you when most needed, because 
it is the hop*, of the hypocrite. Re- 
member whoever perished being inno- 
cent. Wrath kills the foolish man and 
envy slays the silly one. Why are 
you angry at the Lord for what he 
has done. The innocent do not per- 
ish. Despise not the chastening of 
the Almighty, nor faint when thou 
are rebuked of him. Behold happy is 
the man whom God corrects. Pray 
unto him, and if you are innocent he 
will hear you. God has found you 
out, and he has overwhelmed you. But 
even now, if you will repent and be- 
seech him 'he will hear you. But Job 
knew that it was not for any wicked- 
ness of his that God was casting him 
dowu. But he did not know why God 
had overthrown him. He earnestly 
sought to know why God did this, and 
what he purposed by it. Yet God did 
not answer him, nor give him any ac- 
count of these matters. Job also 
knew that his prayers, nor sufferings, 
nor confessions could change the pur- 
pose of the Lord. In his desperation 
he knew no1 what to do, nor where to 
go. It was one of the most noted cases 
of suffering, and oue of the strangesl 
ones to account for or understand. He 
sought for pity and sympathy from 
his friends: but alas they gave him no 
pity, nor did one of them understand 
his case. They judged from what they 
said that God had cast him down, be- 
cause Job had sinned. For said they 
who ever heard that God ever over- 
threw an innocent one. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



This was the plan of Satan to pro- 
voke Job to curse God. 

The Lord God had told Satan that 
Job was in his hand, but to save his 
life. While Satan could not go be- 
yond the word of the Lord to destroy 
Job, but the aim of Satan was so to 
provoke Job that he would cause him 
to curse God. 

Job knew not the cause nor the 
purpose of this strange trial. This ad- 
ded to Job's distress. The matter is 
so handled and controlled by infinite 
wisdom as to cause Job to speak and 
to act as one who declared what was 
in him, and what lie would do. But he 
held ou to his integrity, lie endured. 
It was proven that Satan full of mal- 
ice against the servant of God could 
not so provoke Job, who was the pris- 
oner of Satan, as to cause him to curse 
God, for it was not in Job's heart to 
curse God, nor to deny him. It was 
proven that having the servant of God 
in his possession as a prisoner could 
not so operate on him or to provoke 
him as to cause him to curse God. 

Wringing the nose brings forth 
blood, as churning will bring forth 
butter. Deep troubles discover and 
bring to the surface hidden things 
that, as they are expressed from the 
olive cause the spieess to how out, and 
the choicest fruits to how forth. Ex- 
pressions of faith are uttered in these 
deep valleys that proclaim the glory 
of God, and that man in the hand of 
his maker, while lie is less than noth- 
ing and vanity, utters wondrous 
things, showing that the root of the 
matter is within him, such as this, 
"For I know that my Redeemer liv- 
oth, and that lie shall stand at the lat- 
ter day upon the earth: and though 
after my skin worms destroy this 
body, yet in my flesh shall I see God: 
whom I shall see for myself, and mine 
eyes shall behold, and not another: 
though my reins be consumed within 
me," Job 19:25-27. Nor was Job ash- 



amed of such wonderful words, but 
desired that they were now written 
and printed in a book ; that they were 
graven with an iron pen and lead in 
the rocks forever. 

P. D. G. 



PRAYING FOR RULERS. 

"1 exhort therefore, that, hrst of 
all, supplications, prayers, interces- 
sions, and giving of thanks, be made 
for all men ; 

For kings, and for all that are in 
authority; that we may lead a quiet 
and peaceable life in all godliness and 
honesty. 

For this is good and acceptable in 
the sight of God our Saviour; Who 
will have all men to he saved, and to 
come unto the knowledge of the truth. 
For there is one God, and one media- 
tor between God and men, the man 
Ghrist Jesus: Who gave himself a ran- 
som for all, to be testified hi due 
time." 1 Tim. 2:17. 

This is an exhortation of Paul and 
the first thing in the exhortation is, 
supplications, prayers, intercessions 
and the giving of thanks for all men. 
How can we pray for men if we speak 
evil of them? Rulers are ordained of 
God for the protection of the innocent 
and punishment of the guilty. Thou 
shall not speak evil of the 'ruler of thy 
people. We should respect the laws 
and the administrators of the laws 
and if we do that we will not speak 
evil of them nor cherish malice against 
them. 

The object of prayers, intercessions 
and giving of thanks for all men and 
rulers of authority is that we may 
lead a quiet and peaceable life in all 
godliness and honesty. War, hatred, 
strife and confusion are not desirable, 
hul I hey are grievous. Strife and con- 
fusion do not develop things which 
make for peace and whereby one may 
edify another. We are not to pull 



182 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



down and desfcioy, but to build up. 
The effect of the kingdom of Christ is 
righteousness, joy and peace in the 
Holy ({host. God is not the author of 
confusion but of peace and quietness. 
The kingdom of Christ is a kingdom 
of righteousness, joy, and peace in 
the Holy Chost. Now if Ave are im- 
bued with these principles we will 
have good will toward our rulers and 
will pray that God Avill rule in these 
rulers and will control them. God 
raises up one and puts down another 
doing His pleasure in the army of 
heaven, and among the inhabitants of 
earth. W e are clay in the hand of the 
potter, but God hears the prayers of 
His people therefore we sohuld pray 
for our rulers in order that Ave shall 
have the beneiit and protection of 
peaceable government. The children 
of God are lovers of peace and need 
the protection of a righteous adminis- 
tration of km. The subjects of grace 
should not nurse enmity against the 
law of the land nor feel that they 
have a right to violate any law of the 
land, but that they should obey tin 
powers that be because they are or- 
dained of God. They should render 
tribute to Avhom tribute is due, taxes 
to whom taxes is due, honor to whom 
honor is due; If a man. thinks he has 
a right to evade a laAV because he does 
not like it he becomes an enemy to that 
law. The object of law is to protect 
the innocent and punish the guilty. 
If Ave obey the law Ave have praise of 
the same. In the present conflict 
among different nations it is our duty 
to pray for our rulers that they may 
be guided by wisdom from above that 
measures maj lie adopted to promote 
peace among the people. 

The apostle Paul urges first of all 
that prayers, intercessions and giv- 
ing of thanks be made for all men. 
Are we doing this? It is very import- 
ant, to lead a quiet and peaceable life 
in all godliness and honesty. 



"For this is good and acceptable in 
the sight of God our Saviour, Avho will 
have all men to be saved and to come 
unto the knoAvledge of the truth, Lor 
there is one Cod and one mediator be- 
tween Cod and men the man Christ 
-Jesus." 

Then how contrary to the principles 
of the gospel are Avars and fightings. 
Cue class of men arrayed against an- 
other for purposes of destruction. As 
there is one Cod and one mediator be- 
tween Cod and men the man Chrisf 
Jesus, how contrary to godliness is it 
for one class of men to be arrayed 
against, another class of men to slay 
and kill. Where is the proof that the 
principles of truth are recognized by 
these people. Wars and lightings 
come of lust, evil desires. One man 
or nation seeks .to take from others 
that which is theirs by conquest, which 
is a violation of every principle of 
right between man and man. We 
should be humbled and pray for de- 
liverance from such unlawful desires 
a j id evil passions. 

The Lamb of Cod gave Himself a 
ransom for many that He might bring 
them to God and reconcile them to 
Him. He is the peacemaker and the 
pleasure of the Lord prospers as lie 
reigns in the lives and hearts of men. 
Hereby shall all men know that ye are 
my disciples if ye have love one to an- 
other. He that loveth is born of God, 
for Cod is love. The one mediator be- 
tween Cod and men. the man Christ 
Jesus, gave Himself a ransom for all. 
Then there is only one peacemaker be- 
tween God and men. In due time this 
ransom shall accomplish its purpose in 
the salvation of all the ransomed of 
the Lord. This shall be testified or 
witnessed in due time— that is proven. 

Tli en Avhere is the proof that these 
nations fighting and devouring one 
another are the children of God. Is it 
test i lied that they are? Should not 
men fear before God? What right 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



1S3 



have they to encroach upon the laws 
of God.' What right have they to 
bite and devour one another ? Where 
is the proof that the kingdom of right- 
eousness dwells in them'/ Men boast 
of the progress of science and the 
triumphs of religion. Where is the 
proof of it ' 

Men under the control of principles 
exhibited among the leading nations 
show that they are under the dominion 
of the prince of the power of the air, 
the spirit that now works in the chil- 
dren of disobedience. Is it not a cause 
tot shame and Inundation among peo- 
ple professing to be followers of the 
meek and lowly Jesus. Should it not 
cause us to search diligently and in- 
quire if we are lovers of truth and fol- 
lowers of the Son of peace 1 Where is 
the evidence that the peaceable king- 
dom of Christ is witnessed and testi- 
fied to in our lives and conduct? 

P. D. G. 



HEALTHY EXERCISE. 

''And herein do I exercise myself 
to have always a conscience void of 
offense toward God, and toward men," 
Acts 24:16. 

Perhaps there could not be a more 
healthy exercise for man than is here 
declared of Paul. 

We admit the importance of exer- 
cise as giving activity and strength to 
the body, the mind, the moral nature, 
and the spiritual or religious domain 
of man, in order to develop the highest 
order of man. 

If a child does not exercise its limbs 
in walking, running &e., it acquires 
but little use of its bodily parts. By 
training its limbs it is fitted for mo- 
tion, for labor and control of its or- 
ganism. By the proper use of the 
limbs in training one acquires strength 
of endurance. 

In the training of the mind or intel- 
lect by study its progress is manifest. 



Hence education or the development 
of the mind is obtained. To separate 
between that which is useful and that 
which is damaging, so that we choose 
the good and eschew the evil we ac- 
complish by this discipline of the mind 
a power of investigation. To perceive 
the good of seeking what is commend- 
able and abstaining from all that is 
hurtful constitutes the healthy region 
of upright living. In order to do this 
ones mind must be informed as to 
what is right and good, and it must 
be so exercised as to cleave to the good 
and shun the bad. 

There was a time in Saul's life that 
he would have owned that there was a 
resurrection of the dead as the Phari- 
see held to this tenet: but there was 
not in Saul that healthy exercise of 
understanding that guided him to do 
to others as he would or ought to have 
others do to him. But when the Light 
above the brightness of the Sun shone 
on and in him at once a vision shone in 
him guiding him and teaching him, 
and working in him that which is 
right, sober and Godly. There is a 
powet - in this holy calling that turns 
one from dead works to serve the true 
and living God. 

Saul's name is changed to Paul, de- 
noting thai a new name is given him 
which embodies a new life. If any 
man be in < hrisl .Jesus he is a new crea- 
ture: old things are passed away and 
all things are become new, and all 
things arc of God. This change in his 
Life is wrought by the revelation of 
Jesus Christ in him. He received the 
truth lhat there is a resurrection of the 
dead, both of the jnst and the unjust. 
He became a true worshipper after 
the way they call heresy, believing all 
things which are written in the law 
and the prophets, and have hope to- 
wards (Jod which they themelves also 
allow, that there shall be resurrection 
both of the just and the unjust. Now 
in this I do always exercise myself. I 



mi 



//TON'S LANDMARK. 



am not exercised so much to require 
others to a certain course of conduct 
to please me, as to see that 1 am my- 
self made subject to the rules that 
(•(impel myself in the righteous rule 
of living. If I believe that there shall 
be a resurrection both of the just and 
the unjust, and that God will bring 
everything into judgment, whether it 
be good or bad, then I will exercise 
myself, knowing that God is no re- 
specter of persons, but in every na- 
tion he that feareth God and worketh 
righteousness is accepted with him, 
and that God will render to 
every man according to his deeds, (See 
Rom. 2 :1-10.) 

Especially when Jesus Christ and 
him crucified, risen and glorified, as 
my righteousness, is revealed in me 
the hope of glory that sweetens my 
HOPE of the resurrection of the dead, 
and that in the resurrection life I shall 
be like him, for I shall see him as he is. 

I keep my body under. I mortify 
my members which are on earth, and 
of the earth. I put off the old man with 
his deeds and put on the new man 
which is renewed in knowledge after 
the image of him that created him. 
Now to have a conscience free from 
offence, void of offence toward God 
and man, but walking in peace and 
good will toward them that are with- 
out is the most healthy form of dis- 
cipline that one could be exercised by. 

"We praise athletics as a class of men 
very fortunate who by self-discipline 
have reached great self-control, but 
he that ruleth his own spirit is greater 
than he that taketh a city. If one has 
his tongue bridled, his temper under 
good behavior, his thoughts so chaste 
that he seeks, speaks of things which are 
above, laying aside all wrath and mal- 
ice and evil speaking and desiring 
the sincere milk of the word that he 
may grow thereby, then he is 
strong. 

If one is so exercised in his spirit as 



to speak the truth every one to his 
neighbor and lives in all good con- 
science towards Cod and man so that he 
is not condemneth in that which he al- 
loweth then he is living in peace and 
good will toward men and passing the 
time of his sojourning in that blessed 
fear which witnesses to him that God 
is for him and the life that he now 
lives in the flesh he lives by the faith 
of the Son of God. 

P. O. G. 



WHY INCREDIBLE ? 

"Why should it he thought a thing 
incredible with you that God should 
raise the dead?" Acts 26:8. 

Paul was well informed in all ques- 
tions concerning the Jews. There were 
many sects of them. The Sadducess 
denied the resurrection of the dead. 
Let us eat and drink today for tomor- 
row we die. When we die that is the 
end of us was part of what was held 
by that sect, and it appears to be held 
by some now. 

Paul held the doctrine of God our 
Saviour, who is himself the resurrec- 
tion and the life, who walked out, 
lived this blessed doctrine, who is the 
fulness of the godhead bodily. Jesus 
taught nothing that he is not, but he 
proclaimed the truth for he is the truth 
in perfection, with no inability to per- 
form and fulfill all the pleasure of 
God. 

It is objected that it is unreasonable 
to raise one from the dead that has 
gone back to dust, that is dissolved in 
death, and Avhose dust is to be destroy- 
ed. Take for illustration the first man 
that died namely, Abel. Is it cred- 
ible to think that God should raise 
him from the dead? Job said, if man 
die shall he live again? Job 14:14-15. 
Leaving out the figures and types of 
resurrection, such as the worm pass- 
ing down into death, and out of this 
behold a beautiful butterfly appears 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



after t Ji** death of the worm, we rely 
on the declarations, the prophecy, of 
the bible to establish and settle this 
question. Why should it be thought 
a thing incredible that God should 
raise the dead / There is nothing more 
clearly taught in scripture. Evidence, 
witnesses the most credible, eye wit- 
nesses who saw Jesus before he was 
crucified, who saw him after he was 
crucified, who saw him and heard him 
speak, who handled him after he was 
risen, to whom he appeared by many 
infallible proofs, to whom his resur- 
rection and his exaltation to glory on 
the right hand of God, as witnessed 
by the Holy Ghost in giving repent- 
ance and the forgiveness of sins, guid- 
ing and confirming believers and fol- 
lowers of Jesus, and strengthening 
them to and in the obedience of faith 
unto joy and confidence, and of en- 
durance unto the end is gracious and 
glorious proof of his resurrection from 
the dead. It is also shown in scrip- 
ture that Jesus Christ and his people 
are one, so that if he is risen, so shall 
they arise. If Christ be not risen 
then there is no resurrection of the 
death and if the dead rise not then we 
lire yet in our sins. If we have hope in 
this life only then we are of all men 
the most miserable, because in this 
world we have tribulation. In this 
world or life God's people have their 
evil things. 

There was denial of the resurrection 
in Paul's day. No doubt objections to 
the truth were raised during the life 
of the apostles. Paul considers these 
heresies, and declares the truth of this 
matter. He says that the resurrection 
was denied and it overthrew the faith 
of some. 

One question raised was this, "But 
some man will say, how are the dead 
raised up? and with what body do 
they eome?" 1st Cor. 15:35. 

It is here taught that there must be 
a death before there is a resurrection, 



for it is not quickened except it die. 
Hence that which dies must rise, or it 
cannot he a resurrection. But not in 
the same order. Christ is become the 
first fruits of them that slept. Every 
man shall come forth in his own or- 
der. Christ rises first, afterward 
they that are Christ's at his coming. 
As it is appointed unto men once to 
die, but after this the judgment, so 
Christ was once ottered for the sins of 
many, and unto them that look for 
him shall he appeal' the second time 
without sin unto salvation. 

When Christ shall appear again the 
'dead in Christ, or those that sleep in 
Jesus shall God bring with him. There 
will be believers living on this earth 
when -Jesus comes again. Those then 
Living shall he changed in the twink- 
ling of an eye after the dead in Christ 
shall have been raised— changed. This 
corruptible body shall be changed to 
an incorruptible body. For he shall 
change our vile body that it may be 
fashioned like unto his glorious body. 
Then when we awake in his likeness 
we shall be satislied, and so shall we 
ever be with the Lord. For this cor- 
ruptible or mortal body shall put on 
immortality, and death shall be swal- 
lowed up of life. 

Is not Cod able to do all this? Is 
any thing too hard for the Lord to do? 
Why should it be thought a thing in- 
credible for Cod to raise the dead? 
Bave you a witness in your own ex- 
perience that God quickened you who 
were de d in trespasses and in sins. 
We know that in nature we bore the 
image of the first Adam. Even so in 
the resurrection we shall be raised in 
the likeness of the second Adam and 
be satisfied. 

P. D. G. 



Send ns your Minutes and Book and 
Job work. We do it with neatness and 
despatch. 

P. D. GOLD PUB. CO. 



186 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



SI ST ER EI/IZA -J. ADK1XS. 

On April 6, D14, at 10:30 o'clock, 
the angel of death entered the home 
of Mr. J. P. Adkins and laid its cold 
icy hand on the brow of his faithful 
and devoted wife, and we humbly 
trust bore h,er to a better land far 
away from trials, tribulations and suf- 
ferings that are our portion here be- 
low. .Mrs. Adkins had been afflicted 
for a number of years of that awful 
malady, paralysis, but was blessed to 
be able to attend to her household du- 
ties until last dune when she suffered 
the second stroke which left her a 
perfect invalid until the time of her 
death. She was seldom blessed with 
her right mind and often begged to 
go home. 

Her sufferings were heart-rending to 
witness. i 

All that loving hands of a faithful 
and devoted husband, kind and atten- 
tive children and skilled physicians 
could do was done but to no avail. Our 
heavenly Father saw fit to call her 
home and His will must be done. His 
voice could not return to him void, but 
must accomplish the thing whereunto 
it was sent. Her death has cast a 
gloom over our entire community, yet 
it did not come unexpectedly for it 
bad been apparent to all that the lamp 
of light was slowly but surely burning 
out. 

Mrs. Adkins was before her mar- 
riage Miss Eliza J. Minter of Leather- 
wood, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Silas 
Minter. She was united in marriage 
to Mr. J. F. Adkins, Oct. 22, 1868. 
There were born unto this union 12 
children, eleven of whom survive her. 
One bright and beautiful little girl 



preceded her to the better land twen- 
ty-four years ago. 

The following children survive her : 
W. H. Adkins, of Roanoke, Va. ; J. S. 
and •). M. Adkins, of Wilson, N. C; 
James and Ernest Adkius, of Lynch- 
burg, Va.; G. C. and G. D. Adkins, of 
Dyers Store, Va. ; Mrs. L. G. Stultz and 
Mrs. W. W. Griggs, of Roanoke, Va. ; 
.Mrs. P. II. Barker, Axton, Va., and 
.Miss Amie Adkins, of Dyers Store, Va. 
besides her husband and children she 
is survived by three sisters and four 
brothers to mourn her loss. Mrs. Ad- 
kins was a faithful and consistent 
member of Leatherwood church, al- 
ways rilling her seat unless necessity 
prevented. Her church has lost a 
bright ornament, her neighborhood a 
kind and good neighbor whose place 
cannot easily be supplied. She was in- 
dustrious and energetic and looked 
well to the ways of her household and 
ate not the bread of idleness. She was 
a friend to the sick and poor and al- 
ways tried to cheer and comfort the 
heart broken and distressed. 

Mrs. Adkins was boi'n June 1, 1849, 
making her earthly pilgrimage sixty- 
four years, ten months and five days. 
She was peacefully and tenderly laid 
to rest amid a host of sorrowing 
friends and relatives in the family 
cemetery near her childhood home, 
there to await the resurrection morn. 
Sleep on and take your rest, God in 
his wisdom knew what was best. I now 
offer to husband and children, broth- 
ers and sisters of my esteemed friend 
my heartfelt sympathy in their sad be- 
reavement, hoping when they too are 
called to cross the cold dark Jordan 
of death they may clasp hands with 
her on the banks of eternal deliver- 
ance. 

Her journey through life is now ended 
Her work here on earth is all done, 
And now she's at home with her Sav- 
iour 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



1ST 



With a hattle well fought, and a vic- 
tory won. 

Oh, how we miss you, dear mother ! 
Your face and your form so familiar 
to see, 

But alas! you are hidden forever from 



Till we must meet on 
eternity. 



the brink of 



We're lonely here without you dear 
mother, 

lint God has called you away 

And we in your footsteps shall follow. 

We'll meet you in heaven some day. 

Bleep on, my dear mother, sleep on. 
I must not disturb thy repose 
For thou must lie resting so sweetly 
Away from all earthly foes. 

Written by a friend. 

Mils. t. li. crfcoky. 

.Martinsville, Va. 



BROTHER JOHN W. FARMER. 

By request of .Mrs. ('lee Farmer, the 
wife of brother John W. Farmer, 1 
will attempt to write a sketch of his 
life for publication in Zion's Land- 
mark, although- feeling my weakness 1 
do not think J can do it justice. 

Brother Parmer was born in Wilson 
County, N. 0., in 1N.->:J and died May 
24, 1 1)14. He was the son of Colonel 
John W. Farmer. He was married to 
Miss ( lee Dew in Sept. 1878, to which 
union were born thirteen children, 
one dying in infancy. Four are mar- 
ried and eight are yet unmarried. 

Brother Farmer was born and rear- 
ed on a farm and chose the farm as 
his earthly occupation. 

Some years after his marriage he 
moved to Xash county near Stanhope. 

The burden of this life was great] 
because of a large family and adversi 
circumstances, yet with good judg- 1 



ment, hard labor and strict economy 
he left a good farm and a nice home. 

He gave his children educational 
training. To visit his home once was 
to want to go again, for all was love 
end affection there. 

He was a kind husband, a lovely 
father and a good neighbor, but his 
death is more keenly felt by his dear 
wife who is left to care for two afflict- 
ed sons and the other children. Oil, 
what a great responsibility rests on 
her. May Cod bless her with wis- 
dom, strength and counsel from above 
that she may prove a a 
for those left to her ca 
behold your mother. 

Brother Farmer led 
life, for his word was 
gaming the confidence 



eater th; 



Children. 

exemplary 
and nay, 
his fellow 

»rea1 



man which is fat 
riches. 

He joined the Primitive Baptist 
church at Wilson, the writer not know- 
ing the date he united with the 
church. 

He honored the profession he made 
by keeping his robe unspotted from 
the world and his conversation showed 
he was dead to sin and alive in Christ 
fo*r he had no confidence in the flesh. 
He loved to hear Jesus preached as 
the S»viOur of sinners, and though he 
lived twenty miles from his church he 
always attended qu 
unless providentially 
ing his faith by his v 
administering to the 



ly meetings 
lered. show- 
, and always 
•ch and pas- 



tor. 



lie was deprived of a portion of this 
world's joys as he was partly deaf, 
saying he could not always hear all 
the preacher said, but he saw Jesus in 
it and that was what he wanted. 

He died with tuburculosis of the 
throat, and, although kindly aid was 
given him by doctor, family and 
friends, earthly help could not stay 
|the hand of death. 

I went to see him about three weeks 



188 



Z ION'S LANDMARK. 



before lie diett and he seemed to bear 
his sickness w ith great patience, bear- 
ing much of the love of God in his 
countenance and never complaining. 

He died as he had lived, peacefully 
and gently. 

In his death we feel a loss but he 
has gained heaven and its glories, for 
God says, "Precious in His sight is 
the death of all His saints." 

Brother Farmer lost a world of sor- 
row and death, for he was released 
from a tabernacle of suffering to en- 
ter into the glory of the God where 
no sorrow is known. 

His funeral was preached by Elder 
J. P. Farmer to a concourse of sorrow- 
ing relatives and friends, after which 
his body was laid to rest in the ceme- 
tery ;il Spring Hope to await the sec- 
ond coming of Jesus to be admired 
with all His saints when that body that 
was sowed in dishonor shall be raised 
in glory, and awakening in the like- 
ness of his Saviour where congrega- 
tions never break up or Sabbath never 
ends. 

May his mantle fall upon his chil- 
dren that they may be guided in a 
good way. .May the God of all mercies 
help the poor widow in the cleft of the 
rock, shielding her from all harm and 
supplying her needs in this life and at 
last receive her in that haven of rest, 
is my prayer. 

Written by one who always felt 
better and brighter for being in corn- 
pan v with him. 

ELD. G. W. BOSWELL. 
Wilson. N. C. 



J. R. OOKER. 

Brother J. R. Coker died in this town 
on the morning of Nov. 24. 1914, after 
a short illness with pneumonia. He 
was a great sufferer for the few days 
he was sick and death no doubt was 
a sweet release for him. AH that a 
loving family, kind frisnds and skill- 



ful physicians could do to Keep him 
with us was done, but He who made 
him and loved him had decided to take 
him away from the evil to come and 1 
believe he was ready and prepared for 
the change. 

He was in his fifty-fifth year and had 
been a member of the Primitive Bap- 
tist church since the 3rd Saturday in 
August, 1903, when he joined ''Hope- 
land," brother Moore's church at 
Whitakers, N. C. 

His interest and love for his church 
and brethren grew with his years and 
was manifested in all his actions. His 
home life was blest also. There was 
a perceptible and happy blending of 
the natural and spiritual in the love 
of the members of his household that 
made it pleasant to be with them. 

He is survived by his sons, "Walter, 
Jesse and Julius and his wife and four 
daughters, Mrs. Walston, Misses Lil- 
lie, Effie and Selma who have the sym- 
pathy of all who know them. 

Brother Coker was born, raised and 
married in Edgecombe County, N. C, 
but afew years ago he moved to En- 
field where he died and where his fam- 
ily is now located in the beautiful new 
home which he had just completed. 

Truly he leaves a good name which 
is rather to be chosen than great 
riches, and his taking away seems to 
us short-sighted mortals to be untime- 
ly, but there are no accidents in the 
dear Lord's dealings with His saints. 

"Though he slay me yet will I trust 
Him." 

HIS FRIEND. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Resolutions of respect of Roberson- 
ville Primitive Baptist church in re- 
membrance of our dear brother sind 
deacon. Stephen W. Outterbridge. who 
departed this life January 28. 191",. 

When his Lord called him from his 
pain and sufferings ia this life, vv<! 



ETON'S LANDMARK. 



hope to the land of rest where all of 
God s people rest in a sweet sleep un- 
til the resurrection morn, then we be 
lieve and hope that this dear deacon 
and brother will hear that welcome 
voice of God saying, come up higher, 
where he has already prepared a place 
for all of his little ones. The Saviour 
whom he then shall see with new ad- 
miring eyes already has preared for 
him a mansion in the skies. 

Resolved, That by the death of Bro. 
Outterbridge, Kobersonville Primitive 
Baptist church has lost one of our dear 
fathers in Israel, but we are sure that 
our loss is Ids eternal gain and hope by 
the grace of God to meet our dear 
brother Outterbridge in heaven above. 

Resolved, That we assure the fam- 
ily and friends of Brother Outter- 
bridge our heartfelt sympathy in the 
loss of husband and friend and our 
church a faithful and devoted member, 
and we do humbly hope that God will 
keep us in the knowledge of his king- 
dom, and save us all in heaven. Then 
shall Ave see Ins lovely face, and feast 
upon thy sovereign grace with pleas- 
ure and suprise. 

Resolved Further, That a copy of 
these resolutions be recorded on the 
church book of which he was a mem 
ber. a copy sent to the family of the 
deceased, and a copy sent to Zion's 
Landmark for publication. 

Done by order of the church in con- 
ference, this Feb. 6th, 1915. 

R. A. BAILEY, 

Clerk. 



CHELLIE M( IALPIN. 
Dear Bro. Gold: — I am sending you 
the obituary of my daughter ChelL>3 
McAlpin. 

She was born April 18, 1880, and 
died Sept. 1, 1014, making her stay on 
this earth thirty-four years and thir- 
teen days. 

She wa* married to Alotazo MeAlpiH, 
XapUmber 1, 1912.. 



She was very industrious and a 
faithful wife, always ready to do her 
part in every way. 

Unto them one child was born, but it 
died in infancy. 

She had a hope in Christ and her 
special hymn was "How Firm a Foun- 
dation. ' ' 

She was buried at my old home- 
stead. 

Dear Brother Cold:— Print this in 
the Landmark if you have space. 
Your brother, 

J. K. P. LESTER. 




ELDER L. II. STEPHENSON. 

(irantsboro — Sat. and 2nd Sunday 
in March. 

White Oak-Monday. 

South West— Tuesday. 

North East— Wednesday. 

Hadnots Creek— Thursday, 
i Newport) — -Friday. 

Ruhama— Sat. and 3rd Sunday. 



RILEY' SHEPHERD. 

Riley Shepherd will preach at 
Beaven Dam, Saturday and 4th Sun- 
day in March, if the Lord will. 



elders p. w. williard and 
samuel McMillan. 

Bonr.on — 1st Sunday in March. 
Hannahs Creek— Monday. 
Four Oaks — at night. 
Bethany — Tuesday. 
(Joldsboro — Wednesday. 
Nahunta — Thursday. 
Tysons — Friday. 
Sparta — Saturday. 
Cross — 2nd Sunday. 
Flat Swamp — Monday. 
Robersonville — Tuesday. 
Conoho — Wednesday. 
Kehukee — Thursday. 
Lawrence — Friday. 



190 



ZION'S LANDMAKK. 



Williams — , turday. 

Falls Sunday. 

Wilson — Monday. 

They will need conveyance. 



ELDEK J. E. ADAMS. 

Dunn — Wednesday night before the 
1st Sunday in March. 

.Mingo — Tuesday. 

Hornett — Sat. and 1st Sunday. 

Seven Mile — Tuesday. 

Reedy Prong — Wednesday and 
Thursday. 

Hickory drove — Sat. aud 2nd Sun- 
day. 

( lorinth — Tuesday. 
Oak Grove — Wednesday. 
Four Oaks — Thursday. 
Hannahs Creek — Sat. and 3rd Sun- 
day. 

Benson — at night. 
Bethsaida — Monday. 
Primitive Zion Tuesday. 



ELDER G. M. TRENT. 

White Thorn— March 1. 
Franklin Junction — 2. 
Weatheri'ord— 3. 
Ephesus — 4. 
Strawberry — 5. 
Mountain — 6. 
Axton— 7. 
Friendship — 8. 
Spray— at night 8. 
Conveyance needed when off Kail- 
road. 



NOTICE. 

. Bro. W. R. Dodd, Whitraell, Va., 
has kindly offered to send in subscrip- 
tions for The Landmark, and those 
desiring to subscribe or renew their 
subscription can give him the money. 
A receipt card will be mailed to each 
direct for amount paid. 

P. D. G. 

Wilson, N. C. 



FOR INFORMATION. 
For information and for reference 
we would be pleased to have a Minute 
of every Primitive Baptist Association 
in America and will thank the Clerks 
of the various Associations to forward 
one to me at their earliest possible 
convenience. 



Cancer Cured at the Kellam Hospital. 

The record of tha Kel am Hospital 
is without parallel in history, having 
cured vithout toe u^e of the Knife, 
Acids, X-Ray or Radium, over ninety 
per cent, of the many hundreds of 
sufferers from Cancer which it has 
treated during the past eighteen 
years. We want every man and wom- 
an in the Uniteu States to know what 
we are doing. KELLAM HOSPITAL, 
lt>17 W. Main St., Richmond, Va. 
Write for literature. 



ENTERTAINING BOOK 

I have made an arrangement for a 
very nice Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. GOLD, 




If you wish to read a highly enter- 
taining book of about 80 pages — price 
50 cents — descriptive of characters 
both true and false, as set forth in the 
Bible, send for this book. 

ELDER F. W. KEENE. 
North Berwick, Maine. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



If] 



YOU WILL WRITE A LETTER LIKE 
THIS 

1 wish that 1 knew which one of 
the thousands of letters I receive 
would have the most weight with you, 
my friend. I can't quote all of them 
here, but 1 am going to ask you to 
read these carefully and then give me 
a chance to renew your health and 
make you write me one very much 
like them: 

701 Bernard Street, 
Savannah, Ga., Dec. 28. Vj:d. 

.Mr. N. F. Shivar, Shelton, S. 0. 
Dear S.r: As you are aware, in 19U9 
1 was suffering with indigestion, stom- 
ach and liver disorders and all its 
train of horrofying phenomena for 
several months. I had lived on milk, 
scft eggs, shredded wheat, a very in- 
sufficient diet for an active working 
man, and, of course from disease and 
starvation was in a very low state of 
nervous vitality and general debility. 
I ordered ten gallons of your Mineral 
Water, which I used continuously, re- 
ordering when necessary, and in four 
months gained twenty-nine pounds, 
was strong and perfectly well ami 
have worked practically every day 
since. It acts as a general renovator 
of the system. 1 prescribe it in my 
practice, and it has in every instance 
had the desired effects. It is essen- 
tial to use this water in as large quan- 
tities as possible, for its properties 
are so happily blended and in such 
proportion that they will not disturb 
the most delicate system. It is pure- 
ly Nature's remedy. 

A. L. R. AVANT, M. D. 
Leeds, S. C, March 2, 1911. 

I have tested your Spring Water In 
seevral cases of rheumatism, chronic 
indigestion, kidney and bladder trou- 
bles, and in nervous and sick head- 
aches, and find that it has acted uice- 



ly in each case, and I believe that if 
used continuously for a reasonable 
time " ill produce a permanent cure. 
It will purify the blood, relieve de- 
bility, stimulate the action of ttie liver 
kidneys and bladder, aiding them in 
throwing oft all poisonous matter. 

C. A. CROSBY, M. D. 

These are not selected cases nor 
are the results unusual. I receive 
thousands like them from physicians, 
ministers, lawyers, merchants, farm- 
ers, manufacturers and every conceiv- 
able profession. I want the satisfac- 
tion of receiving such a letter from 
you. No matter what your complaint 
may be, dyspepsia, indigestion, nerv- 
ous headache, rheumatism, gall stone.; 
kidney or liver disease, or any chron- 
ic ailment that has not responded to 
drugs. I invite you to match your 
faith in the Spring against my pocket- 
hook. If the water fails to benefit 
you simply say so, return the empty 
demijohns and I will promptly and 
willingly refund your money — every 
cent. Sign below: 
Shivar Springs, 

Box 55B, Shelton, S. C. 
Centlemen: 

I accept your guarantee offer and 
enclose herewith two dollars for ten 
gallons of Shivar Mineral Water. I 
agree to give it a fair trial, i:, accor- 
dance with instructions contained in 
booklet you will send, and if it fails 
to benefit my case you agree to re- 
fund the price in full upon receipt of 
the two empty demijohns which 1 
agree to return promptly. 

Name 

Addres3 

Shiprin- Point 

(Please write distinctly.) 
Note: — The advertising manager of 
Zion's Landmark is personally ac- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



quainted with Mr. Shivar. You run 
no risk whatever in accepting his 
offer. I have personally witnessed 
the remarkable curative effects of 
this water in a very serious case. 



DO YOU READ MAGAZINES 

Our FREE MAGAZINE GUIDE with 
2500 publications and CLUB OFFERS 
saves you 20 to 50 per cent on year- 
ly subscriptions. Write today for 
prices. 

KUHN SUBSCRIPTION WRITERS 
161 Henry Ave., Akron, Ohio 



The Value of Fresh Air 

The oxygen of the -ir is the world's 
great rjcave~ger. - 

Drawn into the lungs it oxidizes the 
refuse in the blood through the lungs. 

But when the lungs are engorged by 
croup, catarrh or colds the oxygen 
cr.nr.ot per.etrate Oe phlocn and 
therefore cannot reach t.iie mem- 
branes thrjuch which it purities the 
blood. 

Apply Montholatum in the i.ostrils 
and upon the ture t and chest. 

The body heat releases the aroma 
tic volatile oils contained ia the Men- 
. .o'.c.W m. These oils are pungent 
and penetrating. 

..hen inhaled they acoleratd the 
i cw of. the secretions, loosening the 
hardened phlegm and encouraging ir s 
expectoration. 

Then comes the life-giving refresh- 
ing air — nature's restorative. 

Mentholatum is also a germicide 
and an antiseptic. 

It also has a rapid healing effect 
upon all inflamed surfaces, such as 
chapped skin, burns and bruises. 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Nerve*. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

CONNERSVILLE, IND., 

R. No. 1, Box G., 
Agents Wanted. 



Feather Bed Bargains 

For $10 we will ship you ono firet-clase 40-lb Feather 

Bed; one pair 0-i.oui,d>v„t ),.■,• I' .vs :(.//.««,, ,lm. 

/,':■,.. ,«»/,,,/ t «'V, J ,.«. 1 ,/ t .li ( ,f™,/,„l l ,.l;,|., l ,„„ 
(.nirlull si/.- lilnnk. ts; Olid t>. rl, full si?"; 



Sou hern Foal her »nd Pillow Co. Dept. 6 Cx-nsWro, S. V. 

r. K. Hthtt n.l mi.1 *H> U yrxt with y...rr. ply^ 



LADIES $ I 000 RE WARD! f ant°ee"m y y frel't 

Dr. J.'R.SouthlngtoTRemedy Co., 515 Main St. Kansas City. Mo. 



Send us your printing. Work done 
neatly and promptly. P. D. Qt. 



.air Pillows to motch for SI. OO 



SANITARY BEDDING COMPANY. Dept. 346 Charlotte. N. C 



Send us your Job Printing. 

p. d. a 



We want, your business in the 
way of Printing, and will sliiva 
to please you. Send us your Job 
Printing and be convinced 



ft 



DROPSY j 



SdfrS LANDMARK 



PUBLISHEED SEMI-MONTHLY 
AT 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Primitive or Old School Baptist 

VOL. XLVIII. WILSON, N. C. MARCH 15, 1915. NO. 9. 




P. D. GOLD, Editor Wilson, N. C. 



P. 0. LESTER, As 




I 


^lovd. Va. 


$1.50 PER YEAR. 





The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 

"nek for the eld paths where is the good way." 

By She" help of the Lord this paper will oontend for the 
fSMseut lane^mark, gtsided by its stakes of Truth, and 
■twngtkeaisd by its sords of tore, 

it hopes to re j eat ail traditions and imatitntiong of men, 
sad regard only the Bible as tee standard of train. 

It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey 
doses, the King in the Holy Hill of Son, keeping tnenv 
•mtos unspotted from the world. 

It aisss to contend for the mystery of the faith is God, 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediate* and the Holy Spirit, the 
blessed Comforter. 

NOTICE ! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new pestomees. When ens 
wish ee his paper stopped, let hist send what Is due, and atee 
state his poetofitoe. 

Let eaeh subscriber pay for his paper is advaaoe if pos- 
sible, and when ho renews giro she sasso basis ft has base 
going in, anises ho wishes it ehanged, then he should state 
both the old and the new names. 

If the saoney cent has net been receipted, please inform 
n\e of it. When you can always send money by money order 
or shock, or draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Beeh subscriber can tell the time to which ho paid for the 
paper by aeMeing the date just after his name. 

nil brethren and friends arc requested to set as agents. 

AH names and poet emeos should be written plainly. 

nil torero of 8 c opal truth are u nit e d to write for it — if 
so impressed. 

May grace, mercy and pease be multiplied to all torero 
if truth. 

AM consmunicaeions, business totters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, ete., should be sent te 



P. B. BOLD, Waeen, H. 6. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TQ, THE CAUS«5 OF JESUS CHRIST. 



LOOKING TO THE LORD. 

Elder P. D. Gold, Dear Brothei\— 
As I feel so sad and lonely, if not de- 
ceived, I have a mincL.to write, feeling 
impressed to do the same. 

The subject presented to my mind 
is, the coldness of the church of Christ. 
What is the cause? 

To my mind we become so entang- 
led with the things of the world, or 
natural '.Irings, that we, to some ex- 
tent cleave to the things of the world 
more than to the things of God. What 
is the remedy? James says, "Draw 
night to God and He will draw nigh 
to us." 

We have not looked to Him as we 
should have done, for all the promises 
are to His people. We receive all our 
spiritual blessings in Christ who is 
the head of the church. He tells them 
to seek and they shall find, knock and 
it shall be opened, ask and it shall be 
given. He that cometh to God must 
believe that he is a rewarder of them 
that diligently seek him. If we ask and 
ask in faith we receive the blessing we 
ask for. In another place He says, 
"Awake oh thou that sleepest and 
arise from the dead and Christ shall 
give thee light." 

There is not an if in the matter. 
If ye live after the flesh ye shall die, 
but if ye through the Spirit do morti- 
fy the deeds of the body ye shall live. 
Now brethren, what manner of beings 



should we be in loving kindness, in 
meekness and forbearance one to an- 
other? If we are what we profess to 
be we cannot do anything Avithin our- 
selves, but in the- Spirit we can ac- 
complish all things.. 

In regard to our present salvation, 
why should we longer tarry? Go to 
Him and acknowledge onr faults, for 
we are taught that God is faithful and 
just to forgive us our sins and to 
cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 
We should lay aside every weight and 
the sins that so easily besot us and run 
with patience the race set before us 
ever looking to Him the Author and 
finisher of our faith. Then faith is the 
substance of things hoped for and 
the evidence of things not seen. 

Now dear brother, if you will bear 
with mo I will relate a dream or what 
I have seeti and felt of late. I dream- 
ed I spoke of going fishing and start- 
ed on a journey to that end. And as 
I journeyed a certain brother ap- 
peared upon my left side and remain- 
ed with me. The road we were trav- 
eling was the most beautiful I ever 
be held and perfectly level. On «.y 
right was a stream of water clear as 
crystal. On the ground to my right 
were two nets with hoops; of a golden 
color with netting of sil ;er. At this 
point 1 looked upon the water and saw 
beautiful white fishes straight up and 
down in the water about half way out 
of the water. I then told my brother 



19- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



we were ready for fishing. He said 
no we are not ready yet. we have to go 
farther on. We continued on our journ- 

ple, old and young. As we passed 
through the crowd we came to whero 
there was a number of old brethren 
sitting down. They said they aimed 
to have worship and that I was the 
man to do this. The two nets were 
then hung to my right. 1 began to 
shrink and told them 1 was not the 
man. I then saw in front of me a 
platform built about three feet from 
the ground. A pleasant looking man 
arose and taking me by the right arm 
and the brother who had been with me 
taking me by the left arm led me to 
the platform and helped me upon it. 
And as I entered these words came 
to me : "I will send hunters to hunt 
them and fishers to fish them." I be- 
gan talking and the scriptures were 
unfolded in the true sense as 1 believe 
they are in Christ Jesus and Avhile 1 
was talking I saw these same white 
fish come up out of the water standing 
straight up with their little silvery 
fins fluttering as though they were 
praising the Lord, the most beautiful 
sight 1 ever beheld. 

Brother Gold, right here I fail for 
language to express my feelings while 
in this state, but I believe if not de- 
ceived I was shown in the true sense 
that nothing shorf of the power of 
God could ever fish one of God's little 
ones. 

Now as I am making this more 
lengthy than I expected T will close 
by saying that should in is go to the 
press please correct all mistakes an<< 
pardon me if anything has been said 
amiss. 

Hop-? you and family are well. May 
God's blessings rest upon you and aH 
of God's people. 



From your little brother in hopj of 
a better world, 

R. S. SUMMEKS. 

Ruffin, N. 0. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Elder V. D. Gold, Dear Brother:— 

The Landmark of Jan. 15th, 1915, 
reached :ne last Thursday P. M. and 1 
find in it a letter I wrote you a year 
ago, which encourages me to write 
again and try to tell of what I hope 
have been the dealings of the Lord with 
me, a poor worm of the dust,. 1 wrote 
you a few years ago, when I was still 
a member of the Missionary Baptist 
church, that I felt the Lord had shown 
me that I could not remain with them, 
for tkey did not preach the doctrine 
dear to me 

Before placing my name with these 
people the Lord showed me how great 
a sinner I was. I felt that I would 
soon did and be lost in a burning hell 
where there would be no eye to pity 
nor arm to save. 

When reading the bible, each line 
seemed to condemn me, and thus 1 was 
burdened for many years, and within 
me was a willingness implanted, that 
if it were the Lord's will to cut me off 
from time and cast me into the flames 
of woe, it would be just and right, for 
I verily felt my guilt in the sight of 
a holy and just God, though my every 
breath was for mercy, and I realized 
I was helpless and could do nothing. 
Just at 'his point I was, by faith, 
given a view of the blessed Jesus as- 
cending Calvary's nigged hill, and I 
will never be able to tell as I saw it, 
the death and suffering of the precious 
Lamb of God. A voice spake within 
me and aid, "Behold my hands," and 
T saw a stream ol blood running from 
his hands, his head and his feet, and 
in a moment I seemed to be lying at 
the foot of the cross, and I heard a 
voice the second time saying, "You; 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



195 



sins are nailed to this tree," and the 
blood from his pure body seemed to 
Mow :'ree]y, and at the same thue 
wash me whiter than snow, and sound- 
ing in me were these lines 

"The glorious light of Zion 
is spreading far and wide." 

After this another view of the Sav- 
iour was given me. He was sitting on 
a cloud in the east with his hands out- 
stretched, and I heard a voice saying, 
"I am he that was dead, behold 1 am 
alive forever more. My eyes never 
slumber in sleep. My ears are not dud 
in hearing. I hear the faintest whis- 
per. All power in heaven and in earth 
is in my band." 

This ill occurred one morning, and 
in the afternoon of the same day I 
was greatly burdened, wondering what 
these things meant, when there was a 
power struck me from the top of my 
head to rfce soles of my feet, and in a 
moment of time my burden was gone, 
a light shone around me and my heart 
was tilled with love, and at the same 
time these words sounded in me : 

" Your sins are all forgiven" Your 
soul is set free. Go in peace and sin 
no more. 

1 wetl remember how sweet the 
hymn to me. 

"Next door to death he found me, 
And snatched me from the grave." 

I then joined the Missionary Baptist 
church, and after being with them 
many yaars I was shown that 1 was 
not with the true church. I had never 
heard a Primitive Baptist preach. 1 
would like to tell how these people 
were shown to me before leaving the 
.Missionaries, but this letter is already 
a lengthy one, I can never express the 
trouble and sorrow of heart I ex- 
perienced in finding the true church. I 
was impressed to relate my sad feel- 



ings to Elder S. Hassell, and did tell 
iiim how 1 trust the Lord had called 
me out. 1 was received by the Prim- 
itive Baptists and feel satisfied. 

1 have leared by experience that 
salvation is of the Lord, and that man 
is powerless. If I am saved it is grace 
from first to last. 1 do believe in the 
finished work of the blessed Saviour, 
who cried out on the cross, "It is fin- 
ished. 

Please pray for me brother Gold, it' 
you feel thus impressed. 

Yours in bonds of love, 

MELISSA GRIMES. 
50 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains, 

n. r. 



TO THE FAITHFUL IN CHRIST 
JESUS. 

Dear brethren: I am gad that tho 
Lord pnt it \n the mind of Brother F\ 
(i. Lester, as I believe He did to v riie 
as he did on the inner wordings of Kia 
in the fleshly nature of the -hildreu of 
God. I have thought of trying to o!' 
Eer something along the same lia< s 
myself, but seeing, feeling and knowing 
my inability to perform the task, as I 
always have, I have not attempted it 
before, neither do I now, but merely 
in commend the writing of Brothc 
Lester on the subject. His thongriis 
are fine; it least they are mine. I h-tve 
been heart sick at hearing people, who. 
claiming to be Christians, (and God 
forbid that I shauld set myself up in 
judgment against them, saying they 
are not — God's word is the man of our 
counsel) claiming that the children of 
God knOTt the depths of sin only by ac- 
tual commission when we only have to 
know our own wicked hearts, to know 
the depths of sin with all its harrowing 
blackness, without committing a single 
sin, were it possible. "Shall we con- 
tinue in sin that grace may abound? 
God forbid. Shall we rob and plunder 
our neighbors and our brethren to 



196 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



know the depths of sin that we may 
thus make ourselves fit suhjeets for 
the indwelling of the Holy Spirit of 
Cod? I hnd no such teachings in the 
Book, but to the contrary, it teaches 
God's children to live soberly, right- 
eously and Godly, etc. We are taught, 
not only to abstain from the commission 
of the most grossly wicked acts, but, 
the very appearance of evil. 

I believe there are those who think 
they are doing God's service in perse- 
cuting II is children even unto death. 
Bear in mind, He did not say they 
would think so. Some believe a lie 
and are damned. Now, if it were truth 
that was believed, it could not be 
said to be a lie, a lie being opposite to 
truth. As brother Lester so lovingly 
said, and as brother Paul himself also 
so beautifully and lovingly says: "I 
keep my body under, etc." Now, if 
any have done wickedly, in wronging 
his neighbor or his brother or other- 
wise, let him do so no more, and, if 
possible, make amends for the wrong 
already done. 

Brethren, let us not conclude be- 
cause Paul wrote as he did, that he 
was the meanest man in the world, for 
he was not. If we should hnd a Bible 
written 'In Paul, that is, in his flesh 
dwells no good thing" what would we 
think?? When we read the Bible in 
the spirit in which it was written, we 
find that "Me" does not mean you, or 
another -person, but ME. And, "My 
flesh" does not mean the flesh of an- 
other. "The flesh profiteth nothing," 
and, "All flesh is grass." Your flesh 
is no better than other flesh. The world 
concludes that Paul was the vilest 
wretch on earth because he wrote : 
"This is a faithful saying and worthy 
of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus 
came into the orld to save sinners, of 
whom I am chief." Did he mean to say 
that it was any more worthy of his ac- 
ceptation than it was any other Christ- 
ian? Surely not; but to say it was a 



faithful saying, and worthy of being 
accepted by every Christian child of 
grace. Is there one of our little num- 
ber who lias not felt to be the chief of 
sinners! If so, God pity that one and 
if consistent, show such a one the wick- 
edness of that heart of his. 

Neither, brethren, let us become 
alarmed, fearing that all the wicked 
abominations mentioned in the Bible 
to come to pass, should miscarry, and 
that there be any failure along that 
line, but, rather let our fears be that 
we fail to work our own salvation as 
God works in us to will and to do of 
His good pleasure. If we faithfully 
look after this, we need not fear that 
our enemies will fail to look after their 
line. 

Humbly submitted, in the fear of 
the Lord, 

J. DALE. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Charley: — I expect 
that I have thought of you a hundred 
times of late and have desired to write 
to you but I have not been bright in 
my mind so I have put it off. How- 
ever the rust grows thicker and the 
kanker cets more blue so I will have 
to write with this crust on me or not 
at all. I do not know how you will 
read any thing from such an one with- 
out getting stained with the filthiness 
which I feel in my own heart. 

Some days ago a minister, or one 
who so represented himself, came to 
our house and in the course of our 
conversation he said that if I was a 
sinner it was an evidence that I was 
not born again. I told him that I had 
always had fears on that line but that 
I was taught that all men are sinners. 
Now. therefore, if one who is a sinner 
is not bom again surely no one is born 
again. That is the way I understand 
the word of God. In his prayer at the 
dedication of the temple at Jerusalem 
the wise man. Solomon, said, "There is 



"TON'S LANDMARK. 



197 



no man that liveth and sinneth not." 
At the conclusion of that prayer the 
presence of the Lord tilled tiie temple 
so that Solomon could not get in it. 
This was the best of evidence that the 
Lord had indited that prayer in the 
heart of Solomon and that He would 
answers all of it and that he approved 
of it. 

Indeed, the Lord told him that He 
would do all that he had asked. 1 be- 
lieve the word of God more than all 
the preachers in the world. 

Then, «11 the blessed promises of 
mercy are to poor sinners. There is 
one to the great and to those who 
know that they are Christians, for the 
Lord has promised to destroy the fat 
cattle. The little ones, the lame, the 
fallen by the way ones have the prom- 
ise of the protection of God and that 
he will earry them in his bosom, and 
keep them under his hand. Now, while 
it is not pleasant to this old man to 
feel cast down and in the dark yet it 
appears to be the best for the people 
of the Lord. I have heard that the 
valley is the most fruitful place. We 
are glad to get on the mountain side 
and even on the top some times but it 
is not a healthy place for a Christian. 

One of the worst things with me is 
that I am so forgetful. I learn les- 
sons down in the valley (for I stay 
there the most of my time) but I for- 
get them so very quickly and have to 
learn them over again. That makes 
me know how stupid I am and how 
unthankful to the Lord for all His 
benefits lowards me and even to me 
and in me. Had it not been for his 
great mercies I certainly would have 
been destroyed long before this time, 
but her 2m I have hope for the Lord 
has surely been good to me. Would 
he be so good to me and give me his 
children's bread if I was not his? This 
gives me some strength and encour- 
ages me to go on in that hope. Now, if 
I eould just rub this rust anl canker 



off and get to shining as I see the 
brethren, but the more I try to rub 
the thicker it appears to be. Indeed 1 
do not know that there is any rust un- 
til I feel the need of rubbing it off and 
then it is so thick that it hurts and 
makes me so sore that I have to sit in 
the dust and groan for very pain. Thus 
1 find myself bleeding and crying for 
mercy. In calling for mercy 1 have 
to call on the Lord for 1 do not know 
of any other source of niercy, nor do 
1 kno w of any other one who can hear 
the cry of the contrite one. If I could 
know that my hardness was of the 
Lord, that is that the Lord is showing 
it to me that I should be saved from 
it I would be so glad but of this I of- 
ten have doubts and fear that there 
is nothing in it for me. Oh, my dear 
brother, !f I am deceived about all 
this it will be a terrible thing for poor 
me and i am gone forever. I feel that 
I know if I am not saved I shall never 
be for the work of salvation was done 
on the cross and the door is sealed up 
forever. Those who are on the outside 
must there forever remain for the door 
is shut by the almighty hand of the 
living God. There cannot be any other 
redemption. It is made unconditional- 
ly and the die is cast. 

Now, the question with me is, where 
am I? An: T in that blessed redemption 
or am I not? I live in that hope. 1 do 
not believe that I am deceived. Some- 
things T have been given to see that I 
feel that no one but God can show any 
one. It is in these evidences that I 
hope the Lord has shown me his love 
and mercies, and given me to trust 
him. 

We hope you are an wen and in the 
enjoyment of the love of the living 
God. May his mercies ever be with 
you. Pray for us when you have the 
spirit. 

Tour brother. I hope in the Lord, 
L. H. HARDY. 

Atlantic, N. C. 



198 



ZION'S IiANDMARK. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Gold: — Another year 
is near closed and finds me and A. P. 
still alive, which 1 feel is of God the. 
giver of good. 

Now brother, we are living in the 
last days of our lives and could we by 
our good deeds merit our salvation we 
should £*et busy. But 1 feel that I am 
in the hands of Him that gave me life 
and He will give me grace to save or I 
am lost. 

It seems my life and thoughts are 
still sinful and at times I have not 
much hope, and I shudder to think of 
the cold earth as being my bed, or re- 
turning to it and leaving this house of 
clay and all friends that care for me. 

1 do not care for any worldly 
wealth, yet I sometimes think 1 have 
no hope, seeing as my way seems so 
cloudy and not much sun of righteous- 
ness to guide me, and so many clouds. 
As our natural horizon has been so 
cloudy it makes me feel dark. Only 
a few glimpses in my long life to 
make me rejoice in the hope of eternal 
life, and our country is in such toil for 
mastery causes me to look to the Lord 
to keep me from all harm. 

A. LEACH. 

Star, N. C. 

COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Gold: — The voice said 
write, now what shall I write? I am 
now on the bed of afflictions, am ner- 
vous, can't write hardly so any one 
can read it, and still something keeps 
saying within me write, write to Bro. 
Gold, and my experience is before me, 
but I am too weak to write it now ; but 
I will write you a short letter, and 
when I feel a little stronger I will try 
to write i little of my experience. 

Please be patient with poor, un- 
worthy me, and pray for me, if so God 
gives you the spirit, only when he does 



you can pray, and when he does not 
then you can't. 

Brother Gold, I have been in awful 
bad health for a long, long time, but 
every since last May when I had such 
a bad case of appendicitis, and other 
troubles with it, the doctor 's have con- 
tinually said I must go to the hospi- 
tal. Now 1 never have believed in go- 
ing to such places, and being cut up, 
they are preparing me now for that, 
and I want to ask you do you believe 
that we as Primitive Baptists, should 
have such done for our relief, or 
should we continue on as we are, and 
suffer and trust in the Lord? Now 1 
don't mean that 1 will not trust him 
if I go to the hospital: but I am only 
touevhing these things hoping you 
will know and understand what I 
mean, for I am indeed too weak to 
write, lying here in the bed, but 
when I am weak then it is when I am 
strong'. For I feel to know the Lord 
has all power, both in heaven and on 
earth. And oh, if 1 could praise him 
forever more, for his love and tender 
mercies he bestowed upon those 
that love and serve him, and when we 
were in the mire and darkness he 
loved us then, and brought us out to 
see his marvelous light and establish- 
ed our going, and changed our stony 
heart to a heart of prayer. But so 
often we sink down by the wayside, 
and need his kind assistance. I feel 
to say like the Poet, I need thee every 
hour, most gracious Lord. 

Brother Gold, it is with a sad heart, 
that I have got to tell you that 1 am 
not able to send you the money for 
my subscription for the dear old Land- 
mark.. Oil I have enjoyed reading it 
so very much and always so glad to see 
it come, but now I fear you will have 
to discontinue it for we are poor, and 
if I go to the hospital it will be more 
than we can do to pay my hospital fee. 
It seems like we have had so many 
failures of late. My husband you 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



know is a house carpenter by trade, 
and that kind of work is very dull 
now, and my doctor's bills have been 
so heavy for the past year. I know 
you will think it weakness in me to 
tell you all this, but weakness is what 
1 am. 

Brother Gold, if the Lord blesses me 
to ever get up again 1 am going to try 
to pay my past years subscription, 
and ask you to send it to me again. I 
think my subscription Avould be out in 
June, but I feared I would not be able 
to pay it, thought 1 would tell you be- 
fore then. So many times 1 have press- 
ed it to me when the mail man would 
give it to me and thank the Lord in my 
heart for the dear good news. 

Brother Gold, I have written a line 
or two at the time until 1 have written 
a long letter. 1 fear it has wearied 
you before this, so I will close hoping 
that you and dear sister Gold are well. 

i remain your poor little sister in 
hope of eternal life 

MARY E. GARDNER. 

Dear Brother Gold, 1 did not write 
this scribble of a letter for publication. 
It is like myself, too imperfect. 

Brother Gold and Brethren and Sis- 
ters every where, if any of you can 
condescend at any time to come to 
see poor, unworthy me, please do so. 1 
can't ted you Iioav much 1 would ap- 
preciate it if some of you would pome 
and pray and sing some for me. That 
has been my greatest enjoyment for 
the last twenty years. 

Would be glad if it was so that 1 
could be with you all at the Falls, but 
can't. 

Ilopiii'i that the great I Am will be 
with us all, I will close. 

MARY E. GARDNER. 
Kooky Mount, N. C. 

343 George St. 
Remarks:— I am glad to send the 
Landmark to you. There are many that 
are poor and would like to read it, but 
are unable to take it. If any one of 



our friends has some money to spare, 
and will send it to me for such breth- 
ren that desire it, but cannot pay for 
it, 1 will send it at the request of such 
friends, if they will inform me. 

P. D. G. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Bro. Gold: — I have a desire to 
write what I feel to be the Lord's deal- 
ing with me and T hope and trust the 
Lord will guide my pen while I try to 
write. 

When I was real young I began to 
think what would become of me after 
death, i made a confession at a Pres- 
byterian church at the age of fifteen 
or sixteen. I went to dances but could 
not enjov myself like other girls seem- 
ed to. On the second Sunday in May, 
1913, r could sing sweeter than ever 
before, and it seemed like T could hear 
the sweetest singing at night when 1 
la) r down to rest my poor weary soul. 
1 went to the Association at Pleasant 
Crove in North Carolina in 1913, and 
heard much good preaching. 

In the Fall 1 seemed to be rejoicing 
and praising the Lord. TTis name 
sounded so sweet to such a poor sinner 
as T felt to be. Some times I felt like 
all the world was against me. I tried 
1o pray, but it did not seem to go any 
higher than my head. T just felt like T 
didn't have a friend on earth nor in 
heaven. At night when I went to bed 
the Lord's prayer Avould come to me, 
and T could not help but repeat it. I 
would often say, Lord come to me, how 
can I go to thee. 

T w ont to preaching every time I 
could and enjoyed it so much. Tn 1914 
T had strange dreams that T could not 
understand. I dreamed of helping to 
build a railroad and helped to start a 
train. Tn my dream the road was 
rough. 

At night when everything was dark 
the brightest light would appear be- 



200 



DION'S LANDMARK. 



fore me I felt weak and sick and it 
seemed L could not live any longer. I 
felt willing to give up every thing and 
be with God, but may his will be done 
and not mine, 1 would say. I felt I 
would be glad when my time came for 
me to die, but oh I was such a sinner 
in the sight of God. I was trying to 
beg the Lord for his mercy when these 
sweet words came to me, 

"Amazing grace, how sweet the sound, 
That saved a wretch like me; 
I once was lost, but now I'm found, 
Was blind but now I see. 
Twas grace that taught my heart to 
fear, 

And gra?e my fears relieved; 

How precious did that grace appear 

The hour I tirst believed." 

I then wanted to praise him from 
whom all blessings now. 

These words how sweet they ap- 
peared, 

"Be washed in the blood of the 
Lamb. ' ' 

Christ appeared to me as a little 
babe, and at another time appeared 
full grown. 

I went to Pleasant Grove church on 
the regular meeting day but could 
hardly keep my seat until the sermon 
was finished. It seemed like I must 
be with them, but what would be my 
words? They came so free I could 
not help but give up to the church. I 
have not regreted it since. I was not 
baptized until the first Sunday in July 
and these are the words that were on 
my mind as I came out of the water: 
"Precious is the blood that cleanses 
me and makes me whiter than sno v." 

Sweet was the time when first I felt 
the Saviour's pardoning love ap- 
plied to cleanse my soul from guilt, 
and bring me home to God. I know in 
my poor heart I do enjoy being with 
the Primitive Baptists. I don't feel 
worthy of such love and sweet fellow- 



ship, but 1 hope 1 appreciate it. 

This .seems scattering to me but if 
you think this worthy of space in the 
dear Landmark please publish. 

May Glod bless bless you and your 
dear wife. 

I desire to have the prayers of all 
God's dear ones. 

Your little sister in hope, 

MARY APPLE. 

Ruff in. N. C. 



THREE BOOKS OF INTEREST. 

Have You Read Them? 
Biographical History of Baptist 
Ministers 

containing nearly 1000 sketches, 381 
pictures of Ministers, Deacons and tal- 
ented Sisters, together with an Appen- 
dix of much useful information — 

Price $2.00. 
Also Theodosin Ernest, The Heroine of 
Faith, and Ten Days in Search 
of the Church 
both these books in one volume and 
contain 637 pages. No work of its size 
and cost is a better defense of Bible 
doctrine and practice, or sets the one 
church Christ built in fairer colors. 

Price $1.25. 
These books are well printed on good 
paper, substantially and neatly bound, 
and above all they are highly endorsed 
by Elders Hassell, Cash, Thompson, 
Gold, Waters, Dalton, Chick, Hurst, 
Webb, Lester, Cayce, Branscome, Nor- 
ton, Stewart, Henderson, Hanks, Dur- 
rnd, Daily, Moore, Oliphant, Lundy, 
Morris, Hardy, Raulston, Pope, Mew- 
born, Gilbert, Farmer, Denny, Elkins. 
and hundreds of other ministers and 
editors the country over. 
As long as they last both volumes will 
be sent together for $2.75 and if you 
are not pleased with your purchase 
they may be returned in good order 
and money will be refunded. 

Send all orders to 
R. H. PITTMAN, Luray, Va. 



ZTON'S LANDMARK. 



20] 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



•Remove not the ancient landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



P. D. GOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



VOL. XLVIII. NUMBER 9. 



Entered at the postoffice at Wilson 
second class matter. 



WILSON, N. C, MARCH 15, 1915. 



EDITORIAL 



REQUESTS MY VIEWS. 

Brother R. S. Summers requests my 
view of Mark 14:51-52. 

The question brother Summers raises 
is who was this young man that lied 
naked. 

This occurred at a time of the great- 
est excitment and commotion. Judea 
was stirred from valley to valley, plain 
to plain, and hill top to hill top. Sure- 
ly never had there occurred before nor 
since such an event as this. Surely it 
startled the hearts of men. Great signs 
appeared in heaven and on earth, by 
land and by sea. the sun refused to 
shine at this time. Darkness brooded 
over the earth which trembled and 
quaked as if from the great isz 
agony. The rocks bursted. Meu fled 
from this scene. Devils became en- 
raged, the vail of the temple was rent 
from top to bottom, the first time it 
had ever been opened to man's gaze. 
The violence of wicked men, the mal- 
ice of devils had conspired to slay the 
innocent. Every scripture had some 



reference to this most Hotablt erent. 

Prophets desired to search, look iato 
and lind out what manner of Spirit it 
was in tUem that so stirred them. All 
Jerusalem was gathered at the feast 
day of unleavened bread. 

There was just one strange man that 
caused all this who was called Jesus. 
Whence did he come from? Whose 
son is he, and why are so many gather- 
ed to see him. 

No doubt but fear, unaccountable 
fear, seized main people. Among those 
present was this certain young man 
almost naked, having on only a linen 
garment. When he was seized he ran 
and fled away. lie is called a young 
man. Why should lie be considered 
any thing else but a young man? 

It was natural for him to fear and 
flee away because of such fright. 

There was only one character in that 
assemblage that did not fear nor flee, 
nor was unfaithful, and failed not to 
be and do all that was appointed him 
to do. By him a cry was uttered, "My 
God, my God, why hast thou forsaken 

It was the most natural, sincere, and 
truthful as were all his words. 

This event of the young man fleeing 
naked through fear is recorded to show 
that no natural courage nor strength 
could stand against this scene un- 
moved. 

There are notable events that men 
cannot control that witness the most 
startling things of time and sense, and 
we wonder why they are so? What 
does it all mean? Not much of these 
things can we understand. They are 
made witnesses. the occurence of most 
notable events. 

No angel of heaven nor character 
above or higher than man can be oper- 
ated upon, nor moved by fear that 
would cause such to flee from such a 
scene as this young man fled from. 

P. D. G. 



202 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



RISEN. 

"He not here : for he is risen, as 
he said. Come, see the place where 
the Lord lay." Matt. 28:6. 

It is good to do and believe what- 
ever is taught concerning the Lord 
Jesus. When the angel of the Lord 
came from heaven and sat beside the 
sepulcher Avhere Jesus had been bur- 
ied, but who was then risen, Mary 
.Magdalene and the other Mary came 
to see the sepulcher. Behold there was 
a great earthquake. What a power to 
shake the earth, and to cause it to 
quake. The resurrection of the dead 
is an vnuatural event, an unlooked for 
event. No natural man could ever rise 
from the dead unless a power outside 
of himself; and mightier than death, 
could ever raise him. The disciples 
did not ye1 know that Jesus would 
be raised from the dead, nor did these 
women expect that he would rise 
from the dead. What a surprise to 
them to be told that the Lord is not 
here, but that he is risen, and further 
to be told to come and see the place 
where the Lord lay. It was an angel 
that thus spake to them. He knew 
whom they were seeking. It is so 
blessed when we are seeking the Lord. 
Tf we truly seek him we need not fear. 
Yet we must fear before we will seek 
him. Trouble that causes us to seek 
things above this world is a forerun- 
ner that there are better things in 
store fo* us. "Lift up your heads, for 
your redemption clraweth nigh." 

The angel said, come, see the place 
where the Lord lay. Low was his head 
laid in the earth — as low as Ave shall 
be laid. He went down into death to 
reach his people, his body. Death is 
a low stoop. But Jesus must go 
wherever his people shall go. He effec- 
tually reaches every one of them. There 
is nothing' concerning or relating to 
his people that Jesus does not know or 
has not felt. He went down into 



death to deliver them who were all 
their lifetime subject to bondage, 
I Lrough fear of death. He tasted death 
lor every one of them. 

To lie down in death is to pass un- 
der its power. Then when risen from 
the dead to die no more because death 
has no more dominion over him is the 
fullest dis i lay of his triumph over 
every enemy. 

I o come and see and view the place 
where the Lord lay is to know that 
he is rise.i from the dead. How do I 
know that Jesus was crucified? Have 
1 seen the place where he lay? Do I 
know that he was manifest in the 
flesh, was touched with the feeling of 
our infirmities, was tempted as we are 
without sin, that thus he must become 
one with us to reach our case and suf- 
fer for us the just one for the unjust, 
and therefore he went down into 
death for us. When we saw and felt 
the guilt of sin, and the lost estate we 
were involved in, we saw where the 
Lord lay. When Ave saw death de- 
stroyed in his resurrection, because he 
openly triumphed over death with all 
its foes, then Ave knew he is risen, he is 
not there, lie is gone up Avith a shout. 
This was felt when our load of guilt 
was remo ed, when our darkness had 
past and the true light did shine in 
us. 

Old things then had passed away, 
and behold all things are become 
new, and all things are of God. 

The witness of the death and resur- 
rection of Jesus, and that because he 
lives Ave live also gives us assurance 
of our peace with God, through our 
Lord Jesus Christ. 

The diseiples A\*ho saw Jesus cruci- 
fied and dead and buried, and who af- 
ter this saw 1lie empty grave or sepul- 
cher, and then also saw him risen, and 
beheld him and heard him speak, and 
felt his blessed power kneAv that he is 
risen. 

Do Ave also know this? With the 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



203 



heart man believeth unto righteous- 
ness. It is the same power that raised 
up Jesus from the dead that witnesses 
to us that he is risen from the dead^ 
and dieth no more, and that because 
he liveth Ave also shall live, do live the 
life that we now live by the faith of 
the ISou of God, end our faith receives 
all that is taught concerning Jesus 
who is the resurrection and the life. 

P. D. G. 



1GNOKANCE IN UNBELIEF. 

"But I obtained mercy, because 1 
did it iguorantly in unbelief." 

If this declaration should be taken 
abstractly as an utterance of a funda- 
mental principle of divine truth, with 
reference to salvation and that which 
made it necessary, we might readily 
conclude that the more gross and in- 
tense oues ignoiance the better his 
chance for salvation. But the apostle 
does not mean to intimate that ignor- 
ance is the basis of nor the cause for, 
nor the avenue through which salva- 
tion comes. In fact salvation is not 
the subject under consideration. It 
was mercy and not salvation, that the 
apostle obtained. Mercy does not ap- 
ply in a direct and fundamental con- 
sideration of the subject of salvation. 
Christ came to save his people from 
their sins. His work is their salvation. 
His blood cleanseth from all sin. If 
any man sin we have advocate with the 
Father, Jesus Christ the Righteous. 
There was neither sin nor unright- 
eousness in him. In the great work of 
salvation and redemption Christ ac- 
tually lived ant! died, and he atcually 
bear the sins of his people. He died 
without mercy, smitten and forsaken 
of his Father, and of those for whom 
he died. He paid the price and lifted 
the debt. He obtained eternal redemp- 
tion and brought in everlasting right- 
eousness. Herein is eternal salvation 
and everlasting justification. We are 



not redeemed btcause Christ died for 
us, but his death is our redemption. 
He is our redemption, and in his deatli 
we have it. This is not in. mercy, but 
in justice. Itwas first and right in 
sight of iod the Father that the Son 
should die for the sins of his people, 
and it is equally just and right that 
his people are saved with an everlast- 
ing salvation. In this the Father 
afore determined that he would never 
more remember their sins and their 
iniquities. But there was more than 
this determined of Him. He also de- 
clared, ' " I will be merciful to their un- 
righteousness, their sins and their ini- 
quities Mill 1 remember no more." 

Mercy applies to unrighteousness in 
tliis covenant. It is true that all un- 
righteousness is sin, but it is not saidi 
that all sin, in the same sense, is un- 
righteousness. There is such a thing 
as one being dead in sin, and dead to 
sin, but it is not said of one being dead 
in unrighteousners, nor dead to it. The 
term unrighteousness is used princip- 
ally with reference to the principles 
and practices of men who sustain 
some kind of form relating to some 
kind of religion, whether in any sense 
false or true. Every kind, character, 
and form of religion which is in any 
sense and to any extent opposed to 
pure religion and undefiled, which is of 
God, and appertains to him in principle 
and in effect, is unrighteousness. That 
religion which has the form of the true 
worship, but denies the power and vir- 
tue thereof, or which holds to the vir- 
tue and jiower, but denies the rights 
and privileges thereof is unrighteous- 
ness. That which embitters one 
against the doctrine of salvation by 
grace through Jesus Christ, and moves 
to the persecution of all who are in 
that way is unrighteousness. 

Mercy is only applicable to the elect 
vessels of mercy, or to such as were 
given grace in Christ before the world 
began, and applies to their conduct in 



201 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



this life, 
trary to 1 
eousness 
unto the* 
Him by \ 
this does 



ng they do con- 
hoiiness and right- 
st of God is made 
d by the mercy of 
were chosen. But 
■ that the Lord 
ilges his ignorant 
dren, but know- 
remembering that 
las mercy toward 
vhom he loveth he 
urgeth every son 
. And, although 
esires not sacrifice, 
how great things 



they are dust, h 
them, neverthele 
chasteneih, aud 
whom ho recei 
he has mercy, ai 
yet he shows th 

they shall suiter for his name's sake. 

Jn the case of the apostle Paul, he 
was an extremely religious man, one 
of the strictest of the Pharisees, and 
as touching the righteousness of the 
law he savs he was blameless, he was 
brought up and taught in the perfect 
manner of the law, and in literary at- 
tainments was perhaps equal to any of 



his 



,'!))(! 



stle 



outsript 



them all, and jet as touching the 
righteousness of God by grace through 
his Son Jesus Christ he was utterly 
ignorant, and was full of unbelief. Nor 
did he have the slightest apprehension 
of the will of God, and his divine pur- 
pose that he was embraced in the elec- 
tion of grace, to obtain salvation by 
grace, and should bear the name of 
Jesus to the Gentiles, and rulers and 
kings of the earlh. And although he 
was with himself so strictly and suffic- 
iently righteous, it was but the very 
spirit of blasphemy and persecution 
which moved him, through the ignor- 
ance and unbelief of which he was 
possessed, not only to blaspheme him- 
self, but to compel others to do like- 
wise. While in this awful state of self- 
ri'diteousness he says he verily thought 
within himself to do many things con- 
trary to the name of Jesus of Nazar- 
eth, which things he also did. And it 
was for these tlnngs that he obtained 
mercy, itciiuse h« did it ia the ignor- 



ance and unbelief of his evil heart. 
This ignorance in this connection was 
not as pertaining to literal things, but 
to spiritual things. It is said of Peter 
and John that they were ignorant and 
unlearned men, and such they were 
literally, but they had heard and learn- 
ed of tho father, and were wise unto 
salvation through faith which is in 
Christ Jesus. But there are those who 
are ignorant and unlearned who wrest 
the scriptures from their true interpre- 
tation, and of such was Saul until the 
Lord appeared unto him by the way 
and revealed unto him the blessedness 
of the way which he had blasphemed 
and injured. 

Notwithstanding the apostle obtain- 
ed mercy, because he did these things 
ignorantly in unbelief, the fact that he 
had persecuted the saints of God, and 
compelled them 1o blaspheme lingero.d 
in his memory like leprosy in the walls 
of a building, and because of which he 
never cc rld feel that it was meet that 
he should be called an apostle. Even 
while h.2 was building up in his apos- 
telie work he could but remember pain- 
fully how he had aforetime persecuted 
the church and wasted it. How pe- 
culiarly precious must have been the 
healing virtues of the mercy of God 
to the quickened, purged conscience 
of this his humble, patient, faithful ser- 
vant. How readily and effectively 
this experience must have entered into 
the general preparation by which he 
became so aptly fitted to serve in the 
varied stages and walks of life to 
which he was assigned. "With what 
ease and assurance he must have found 
access into the hearts, experience and 
eonfidMve of the all men to whom he 
was made all things. Without hypo- 
crises, without deceit, without boast- 
ing he was at once in the lead of the 
saints as one with them. 

Are we not together with Paul pen- 
sioners upon the daily bounties of the 
mercies «f *ur Is it »#t «f tkt 



''TON'S LANDMARK. 



205 



Lord's mercies that we, like him, con- 
tinue unto this present time? 

David said, Kiirely goodness and 
mercy have followed me all the days 
of my life, and I will dwell in the hnuse 
of the Lord forever. 

May it be ever thus with us. 

P. G. L. 



LIFE ETERNAL. 

'"And this is life eternal, that they 
might know thee, the only true God, 
and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast 
sent," John 17:3. 

God has given Jesus Christ power 
over all hesh, that he should give eter- 
nal life to as many as the Father hath 
given. And eternal life is that these 
thus given unto him of the Father 
should know the Father and Jesus 
Christ which the Father has sent. 

1st. The highest knowledge then is 
to know God the Father and Jesus 
Christ whom he hath sent. 

Naturdly we do not know God nor 
his Son Buried in the blindness and 
darkness of sin, and sitting in the reg- 
ion and shadow of death, we know not 
God nor his Son. 

In the transgression of the first man 
Adam d'.-ath passed upon him and all 
his offspring. This death is in toes- 
passes and in sins, enmity against Cod. 
Blindness and ignorance of the true 
God, and of himself also is manifest. 
Enmity e gainst God is manifest in 
him. is not subject to the law of 
pod neither indeed can be. 

2nd. Law was given that the crea- 
ture might know his condition, for by 
the law ts the knowledge of sin. 

The wages of sin is death. When the 
commandment comes sin revives, and 
the creature dies. 

3rd. This is peculiar and experi- 
mental. Paul said I had not known sin 
but by the law. Then it is a teacher, 
a school master. When it comes the 
fuilt »f tk« Mouur it sk»w» t* kim, 



and felt in him. Then he dies to his 
former relationship under the law of 
sin and death. 

4th. Thus he passes out of death in- 
to life a new creature in Christ Jesus, 
is born again, or begotten unto a live- 
ly hope by the resurrection of Jesus 
Christ from the dead. He is dead to 
the law by the body of Christ, but the 
law of the Spirit of life in Christ 
Jesus has made him free from the law 
of sin and death. Because coming in 
tiie tlesh, made of a woman, made un- 
der the law to redeem them that 
were under the law, that we might 
receive the adoption of sons. And be- 
cause we are sons God hath sent forth 
the Spirit of his Son into our hearts 
crying, Abba, Father. This is the wit- 
ness of freedom from sin and death. 

5th. As soon as Adam sinned, or in 
that very day death passed upon him 
and all 'lis offspring. The law is the 
ministration of death which came by 
Moses. But grace and truth came by 
Jesus Christ. Sin reigned unto death, 
but graire reigns through righteous- 
ness unto eternal life by Jesus -Christ. 

6th. "V\ hen sin is forgiven through 
the blood or life, death and resurrec- 
tion of J3sus, then life is manifested to 
the dead. He that believeth in Jesus 
is passed from d-jath unto life, and 
shall live forever. He that liveth and 
believeth in Jesus shall never die. That 
which is born of Cod never dies. When 
sin is pardoned through the blood of 
Jesus it is ended. Their sins and their 
iniquities will I remember no more. 
This is the new covenant of life and 
peace : when sin which is the cause of 
death is done away everlasting life 
follows. God so loved the world that 
he sent his only begotten Son that 
whosoever believeth on him should not 
perish, but have everlasting life. Then 
Jesus is sent from God to save sinners; 
and the salvation of the believer in 
Jesus -..hies through the faith of the 
S«» «f Gad. He tkat receives Jesus 



206 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



also receives power to become the Son 
of God. Nor is there any uncertainty 
about his becoming the Son of God 
that receives Jesus. ' Nor is there any 
uncertainty about his receiving Jesus, 
because ail that the Father gives to 
Jesus shall come to him; and the 
Father gives them to Jesus before they 
come to him. So that salvation is 
committed to Jesus Christ, the Medi- 
ator, unto whom all power in heaven 
and earfh is given. 

Then Jesus Christ is sent from 
heaven by the Father to seek and to 
save that which was lost. Whosoever 
believes on Jesus hath everlasting life, 
and shall never come into condemna- 
tion, but is passed from death unto life. 

7th. This is eternal life to know 
thee the only true God, and Jesus 
Christ whom thou hast sent. There is 
but one true and eternal God. Hear 
O Israel, the Lord thy God is one God, 
who is manifested and declared as 
Father, Son and Holy Ghost, and 
these three are one. 

He is a jealous God, and will not 
give his glory to graven images. It is 
such exalted glory, so far above all 
other glory, that there is none like un- 
to it in Loaven, nor on earth, nor un- 
der the earth. Nothing can be com- 
pared to him. fie is as far above man 
as the .heavens are above the earth. 
God taught Israel that the gods of the 
hills and the valleys which men wor- 
shiped ere idols. 

So far above man is the true God 
above all false gods that one must not 
wear a linsey, woolsey garment. AVool 
grew on sheep on the hills. Flax grew 
in the low places. These could not be 
mixed. God's people must be sepa- 
rated from the nations of the earth. 

There be gods many and lords many, 
but to us there is but one God and 
Father, who is above all, and through 
you all, and in >ou all and we of him: 
and one Lord Jesus Christ by whom 
are all things and we are by him. 



To know thee the only true God and 
Jesus Christ whom thou has sent into 
the world, as the only Saviour, is the 
highest, the most excellent knowledge, 
the perfect knowledge in which there 
is no sin nor death. 

To know the ever blessed Father 
and Son excludes all that is corrupt 
and that shall perish. 

P. D. G. 



REQUESTS MY VIEWS. 

Sister Rhoda Shields of Danville, 
Va., requests my view of Rev. 10:8-11. 

The matters contained in this scrip- 
ture are such that I know not their aw- 
ful and deep import. What do we 
know of the future? We know noth- 
ing, of ourselves, even of the present. 

The Lord God showed to John things 
relating to the end o ftime. The angel 
with his right foot on the sea and his 
left foot on the earth, showing that 
the sea and the dry land were under 
his power. He had a little book open. 
Seven thunders uttered their voices. 
When the seven thunders had uttered 
their voices I was about to write, and 
a voice .spake unto John saying, seal 
up the things which the seven thund- 
ers uttered, and write them not. He is 
commanded to take the little book out 
of the hand of the angel and eat it. 
This lie did. It was sweet in his mouth, 
but bitter when swallowed. He is told 
he must prophesy again. 

One lesson we learn in our travail or 
sojourn in time. Things that at first 
taste sweet are afterward made bitter. 
This causes us to prophesy. As death 
works in him to whom the little book 
is given, it causes the utterances of 
prophesy or preaching to be pro- 
claimed. Death or bitterness works in 
the preacher, but life works in the 
hearer. The beginning seems to be 
sweet and joyful, but the end is bitter. 
Such are the sorrows of the way that 
no deliverance appears to us, but dis- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



207 



tress; yet the v/ill of him who holds 
the stars in his right hand measures 
out our jvrtion unto us. The longer 1 
remain oh the earth it seems the more 
I see \n<i feel thai 1 am less than noth- 
ing and vanity, and that sorrow 
awits u«? in this time state. If we were 
at ease and had no sorrow nor trouble 
we wouil be at ease in Zion. But out 
of the abundance of our sorrow we 
speak. Vanity of vanities saith the 
preacher, all is s anity. 

P. D. G. 



IN PEAR AND TREMBLING. 

Dear brother Gold:—] fear and 
tremb'e io address you thus, fearing 1 
am not worthy. The sin in this body 
of mine gives me more trouble than 
any thing else. Why can not I think 
and do right? 

Does a dead sinner pray to God to 
glrids him in the right way? 

1 do feel I am so vile. How can a 
christian feel so \ile? It seems I have 
more crosses and trials than any one 
on earth, and am the least able to bear 
them in my old age. I think some- 
times that being old, and my mind not 
being as clear as it was formerly, it 
may be that is the cause. 

But Brother Gold, I look around, 
and I do not have to look much, but 
there is more sin now than I have ever 
known in my day. 

When it is well with you pray for 
me. The Landmark is my comfort 
next to cite bible. 

Yours [ hope in brotherly love, 

Mlis. PEYTON SYKES. 

Bunn, N. C. 

fcEMARKS — Suppose we could have 
ah the gf<od things we want here, and 
have no sorrows except such as we 
would choose, how many sorrows 
would we have? 

Abraham said to the rich man, Son, 
remember that in your life time you 



received your good things, and also 
Lazarus Jus evil tilings; but now he is 
comforted, and thou art tormented. 

Suppose we could have our good 
things here, when w T ould we have our 
evil things or sorrows? 

Jesus said in the world ye shall 
have tribulation, but in him we have 
peace. When we have endured to the 
end then peace will come, for he that 
endureth unto the end the same shall 
be saved. 

Rest will be sweet to them that 
have their evil things in this life, and 
hope for salvation from this vain and 
evil world. 

1 do lot know how to pray as 1 
ought, nor can of mine own self do any 
thing. Sinful is my nature, nor can I 
cleanse myself. Thanks be unto God 
that giveth us the victory through our 
Lord .Tcvus Christ. 

Christ is the hope of the Lord's peo- 
ple. Fa him we are accepted. 

P. D. G. 



"WHAT DO THE DEAD KNOW?" 

Elder P. D. Gold, 

Dear Sir: — Will you please publish 
in the Landmark your views of the 
subject What Do the Dead Know?" 

I recently read a sermon by Dr. St. 
Clair of (Jeorgia on that subject and 
would 'v glad to know what you be- 
lieve on it, that is, if they know what 
the living are doing. 

Yours truly, 

JENNIE UZZELL. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

REMARKS: — Solomon the wise man 
said the dead know not any thing. See 
Eccl. 9:."). "For the living know that 
they shall die: but the dead know not 
any thing, neither have they any 
more a reward; for the memory of 
them is forgotten." 

The scripture says Solomon had 
wisdom and knowledge more than any 



208 



ZION S LANDMARK. 



other. See 2nd Chroii. 1:12. 

Ee surpassed any other man in wis- 
dom and knowledge, liis utterance is 
tnat the dead know not any thing. 

1 have seen and known of men that 
consider that the dead are wandering 
in the ah' as ►Spirits, and talking with 
the living. Some think they are rest- 
less and wandering from place to 
place. 1 have known or heard of peo- 
ple afraid to visit graves at night, 
afraid oJ: the deed as if they had any 
power, people who would not be afraid 
to steal, yet are afraid of ghosts and 
spirits. 

But the dead have no knowledge, 
nor power, nor understanding. They 
cannot come back to us. David the 
prophet said when his child died he 
cannot I'ome back -to me, but I shall 
go to him. 

There is much infidelity and dark- 
ness in the minds of men concerning 
the dead. There is much sin committ- 
ed in this way. While we are living 
we do not kno.w what is in the future. 
Then how can we know after we are 
dead? Why do men attempt to com- 
mune with the dead? It is a darkened 
spirit of falsehood. If any man lack 
w isdom let him ask of God, not of the 
dead w ho do not know any thing. 

There is no acount of the spirits of 
those departed from earth coming 
back to show things to the living, or 
to commune with them. Such things 
dwell in I he darkened minds of sup- 
erstitious men and give evidence of 
their being under the power of evil. 

The d?rd know not the future, nor 
do they know what the living are do- 
ing. Mankind sometimes dream of 
the dead appearing to them, and tell- 
ing them certain things. But these 
things dwell in the minds or imagina- 
tions of men. 

If we are delivered from the sup- 
erstitions of evil within ourselves, and 
of others, and are led by the Spirit of 
God, and guided into all truth by him, 



or by the sound principle* of bibl« 
teaching, then we walk by faith and 
not by sight or imagination of men. 

P. D. G. 
(To be continued.) 



QUESTION? 

A brother asks this question, which 
do you think is worse, for a Baptist to 
play cards or get drunk? 

I do not think a true Baptist would 
wish to do either one. What good is 
there in getting drunk, or playing 
cards either. If 1 am right my desire 
is to do those things which are for edi- 
fication, or building up the things 
which are right and beneficial. What- 
soever you do let it all be in the name 
of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of 
our Lord. 

Card playing is generally associated 
with things a true Baptist does not 
fellowship, nor wish to encourage. 

It seems a drunkard even himself 
would no', defend drunkenness on any 
ground. 

There is no good sense in choosing 
the less of two evils. 

REJECT THEM BOTH. 

Abstain from even the appearance 
of evil. 

P. D. G 



Gt>& 



uaries. 



MRS. MARY CATHERINE CREWS. 

It is with mixture of joy and sorrow 
that J announce the death of my last 
sister, Mrs. Mary Katherine Crews, 
daughter of Elder R. D. Hart and his 
wife Martha Arrington. 

She was born July 26, 1838 and en- 
tered into eternal rest about 7 o'clock 
Feb. 15, 1915, being nearly 77 years of 
age. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Slit ira« married twice. By her 
first marriage she leaves one daughter, 
Mrs. J. Brothers, and one grandson, 
Cecil Brothers; By her last marriage 
she leaves one son, Joseph Crews. 

Owing to her feeble health her life 
was lonely and sad, spending most of 
it in hospitals, but meeting with man- 
kind friends; but God's blessing is 
promised to all who ministered to her 
in lier sickness and sorrow, for He 
says, "in that you did it unto one of 
these my little ones, you did it unto 
me, enter thou into the joys of thy 
Lord." 

When I heard she was worse I went 
at once to her and found her daughter 
with her. She knew both of us and 
was anxious to be taken to Bessie's as 
she dichrt wish to die at the hospital. 
She was placed upon a cot and moved 
on Friday, Feb. 12. She bore the trip 
well and said nothing hurt her. The 
cot was taken from the cars to her 
room by kind hands. She received 
every kindness ^nd attention from her 
daughter and many friends. 

1 was by her day and night and she 
knew :is to the last and she always 
said that nothing hurt her, seemed per- 
fectly comfortable, and taking no 
medicine and but little nourishment. 

"Oh death where is thy sting?" 

After her tranquil falling asleep in 
Jesus my mind reverted to a dream 
she had. She saw a beautiful rainbow, 
at one end was a cross and at the 
other a crown. She asked me what 1 
thought of it. I told her it was the bow 
of promise — that after we bear the 
cross we shall wear the crown, and 
that "(?od is not slack concerning His 
promise." He says, through much 
tribulation we enter the kingdom. 

With this bright promise and evi- 
dence we hope she has had an abund- 
ant entrance into that rest that re- 
mains +o the people of God. 

She has been a Primitive Baptist for 
many years and this faith kept her to 



the last; "Kept by the power of God 
through *aith unto salvation ready to 
be reA r ealed in the last time." 

(jhrace, the balm and cordial of all 
her sorrow has cast her "littering 
crown at Jesus' icet and crowned Him 
Lord of all. .May this grace dwell with 
every one who has helped her to bear 
her burden, and "so fulfilled the law 
of Christ." 

She was buried in Goldsboro, tht 
floral designs being many and beauti- 
ful for which we thank her many 
friends. 

"Dearest sister, thou hast left us. 
Here thv loss we deeply feel: 
But 'tis God that has bereft us, 
He can all our sorrows heal." 

Her sister, 

PATT1 A. FULGHUM. 
Wilson, N. C. 

REMARKS :— Mrs. Mary Katherine 
( Yew s was well known in Wilson, be- 
ing highly esteemed for her noble, 
womanly character. She was of an 
appreciative taste for what was enob- 
ling. She was social, a lover of virtu- 
ous living, and left a pleasant remem- 
brance of her lovely life in the memory 
of h'T friends who will hold in sweet 
memory her noble traits of character. 

P. D. G. 



MRS. RILL IE J. SIMPSON. 

Elder P. D. Cold: — I am requested 
to write the obituary of my dear sister 
Piillie J. Simpson, wife of Tommy 
Simpson, daughter of W. R. Fountain, 
and Minervia, who departed this life 
on the 26th of Jan. 1915. leaving be- 
hind hjer husband and three children 
to mourn their iqss. She united with 
the Primitive Baptists a few days be- 
fore her death. She seemed to have a 
strong hwpe in the faith. She came to 
the place where she said she wag will- 



210 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



fog to die — willing to surrender up the 
lust of this world in hope of a better 
one beyond this vale of sorrow. What 
a blessed thought it is to have that 
liope beyond this world of sin, to 
think of reaching a home of peace and 
love where joy shall never end. 

1 hope our loss shall be her gain. 

She was confined awhile before hex- 
death with consumption from which 
she never recovered any more. 

I feel a good deal better about her 
since sh'3 confessed what she did. 1 
hope she may reach that Holy City 
where the saints of God are gathered 
together. She has gone as all must 
go, but how much better we feel to 
hear one confess their weakness and 
trials they have endured. She has 
three brothers and three sisters to 
mourn their loss but what a blessing 
it is that we are born to die. 

May that sweet chord of peace and 
love never be broken. 

There was a meeting held at her 
home by her request and Elders Isaac 
Jones grid Eli Bryan attended, and 
she was received in fellowship with the 
church, bat was never baptized on ac- 
count of her illness. 

May His will be done. 

Lovingly, her brother, 

A. L. FOUNTAIN. 

Chinquapin, N. C. 



MISS DOROTHY JENNIE WAT- 
L1NGTON. 

The subject of this sketch was born 
June 30, 1890, and departed this life 
January 18, 1915, making her stay on 
earth 24 years, 6 months, and 18 days. 
Her father, Thomas J. Watlington, 
(deceased), married Dora Gilliam, to 
which union were born four children 
(three daughters and one son.) Her 
mother, now sister George W. Brooks, 
and elder sister, Blanche "Watlington, 
are members of the Primitive Baptist 
church at Gilliams. 



The de-eased had been in poor health 
for several months. She was given the 
best attention that human skill could 
furnish, but she gradually grew weak- 
er and weaker a& the disease destroy- 
ed her vital organs. She was a pleas- 
ant and modest young woman, kind 
and affectionate, and had a large num- 
ber of friends. Although her suffer- 
ing \y;in apparently very severe at 
times, sh'3 bore her suffering with pa- 
tience iftid christian fortitude. She 
was not a member of the church, but 
had an humble hope in Jesus, and was 
willing to die, realizing that her life 
was hid with Christ in God. She talked 
comfortingly concerning her hope, and 
said that she had a dream in which she 
went to the church, was received, and 
I baptized her. (She had this dream 
before I began to exercise a gift.) She 
realized that she was a poor needy sin- 
ner, and if saved at all, saved by grace, 
but had been taught by her experience 
that her righteousness was of Jesus, 
who was her hope, her all. She asked 
her friends not to grieve for her, but 
rathe* lei 1 us all be happy together. 
She wanted God s people to pray for 
her, and sing some of the songs of 
Zion, her favorites being, "0, How 
Happy Are They," "There'll no Dark 
Valley," 'Home Sweet Home," and 
others, which we tried to sing for her 
comfort. Her last words were, "Turn 
me over and let me go to sleep." 

Yes. We feel like she is sleeping 
that blessed sleep from which none 
ever wake to weep. 

Her remains were brought to Gil- 
liams, and after 1 had spoken from 1 
Cor. 1 5 19, were interred by her 
father, who died on June 7, 1900. 

May we be reconciled to this dispen- 
sation of providence, and walk in wis- 
dom tttward them that are without, re- 
deeming the time. 

Yours in hope, 

J. W. GILLIAM, JR. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



211 



MRS. LOUISA V. MONSEES. 

The subject of this sketch was born 
August 6, 1847, iu Davidson County, 
North Carolina; was married March 
2, 1876, to Henry Monsees of Smithton, 
Mo., who, after his marriage located in 
Davidson County, North Carolina ; 
joined' the Primitive Baptist church at 
Pine, said county and State, December 
10, 1887, and was baptized the follow- 
ing day by the pastor, Elder J. A. 
Burch; died January 9, 1915, and was 
buried at the cemetery at Pine church, 
to await the blessed resurrection of 
the dead. 

To the above named union, were 
born six children, five boys, Elder W. 
M., Mr. D. P., Obediah, Elder J. A. and 
L. j\ Monsees, and one daughter, Miss 
Florence Monsees. Obediah preceded 
her to that blessed home above twenty- 
two years, dying in his fourteenth 
year. Besides the above named chil- 
dren, she leaves one step-son, Mr. J. E. 
Monsees, and eleven grand-children to 
mourn thair loss. But, thank God! we 
mourn not as those who have no hope. 
Our loss is her eternal gain. 

Mother had the privilege, for which 
she always seemed happy, of seeing 
all of her children but two unite with 
the dear old church she loved so well, 
two of whom were afterwards ordain- 
ed to preach the blessed doctrine of 
grace, a theme ever dear to her heart. 

We all miss our precious mother 
more than we know how to express — 
just to think mother is gone, and we 
shall never more see her lovely face, 
hear her sweet voice and loving coun- 
sel, is the saddest thought that ever 
came into my mind — but she, for the 
last four years, had been such a great 
sufferer, that Ave, for her sake, were 
made to rejoice that she could go 
home, but for our sake we mourn. 

For two years previous to her death, 
she was a helpless paralytic, her men- 
tal faculties having entirely failed, 



and she suffered untold pain, but, as 
long as her mind served her, she de- 
voted herself to those things which 
honor the name of the blessed Master, 
and bore her sufferings with humility 
and christian fortitude. 

As a devoted wife, unexcelled, and, 
as a Mantle', loving mother, it is but 
natural for me to feel she had no equal, 
and proved herself a friend to all, and 
was loved by all who knew her. 

May Cod help us to emulate her 
noble deeds, strive to live the sweet 
christian life our mother lived, and 
prepare us to follow her to that bless- 
ed home where sad separations are 
never known, and where there will be 
no more sad fore wells, is the prayer of 
her unworthy son. 

In sadness, 

J. A. MONSEES. 



elders p. w. w1lliard and 
samuel McMillan. 

Cross Roads — 2nd Sun. in March. 

Flat Swamp — Monday. 

Robersonville — Tuesday. 

Conoho — Wednesday. 

Kehuk ee — Thursday . 

Lawrence — Friday. 

Williams — foaturday. 

Falls Sunday. 

Wilson — Monday. 

They will need conveyance. 



RTLEY SHEPHERD. 

Riley Shepherd will preach at 
Beaven Dam, Saturday and 4th Sun- 
day in March, if the Lord will. 



ELDER J. D. YASS, OF VIRGINIA 

Falls— Sat. and 2nd Sun. in March. 
Nashville — Monday. 
Peachtree Tuesday. 
Sandy Grove — Wednesday. 
Healthy Plains — Thursday. 
Contentnea — Friday. 



21.2 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Scott 's — Saturday. 

Upper Black Creek — Third Sunday. 

Beulah — Monday. 

Creeches — Tuesday. 

Salem — Wednesday. 

Clayton — At night. 

Winston-Salem — i/hunsday night. 

E. E. LUNDY. 



ELDER J. E. ADAMS. 

Hickory Grove — Sat. and 2nd Sun- 
day in March. 

Corinth — Tuesday. 

Oak Grove — Wednesday. 

Four Oaks — -Thursday. 

Hannahs Creek — Sat. and 3rd Sun- 
day. 

Benson — at night. 
Bethsaida — Monday. 
Primitive Zion Tuesday. 



ELDER L. H. STEPHENSON. 

Grantsboro — Sat. and 2nd Sunday 
in March. 

White Oak — Monday. 

South West— Tuesday. 

North East — Wednesday. 

Hadnots Creek — Thursday. 
1 Newport) — Friday. 

Ruhama — Sat. and 3rd Sunday. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear brother Gold: — 1 will endeav- 
or to write you once more, just a lit- 
tle, if you will bear with my weakness 
while i try to express what is in my 
mind. I don't know what I can say 
anything that will be cf any comfort 
to you or any one else, but it will 
ease my mind, for I delight to speak 
of the mercy and goodness of God, and 
the wonderful manifestation of his 
power, find love to his poor dependent 
children. 1 believe I rejoice to sit un- 
der the sound of the true gospel and 
kenr his name proclaimed, for it is 
j»»Mc« t* our ceult. Ue ka« said, 



"Peace I leave with you, my peace I 
give unto you."' His peace is inex- 
pressibly sweet, beyond anything that 
man can give. 

Brother Gold, 1 can say of -a truth, I 
feel good today. 1 have been so great- 
ly benefitted for the last two days at 
our regular meeting. We were per- 
mitted to hear wonderful preaching, 
or at least to me it was wonderful; per- 
haps 1 was given better hearing than 
usual. You know we do not always 
have the hearing ear, though I heard 
others say they uijoyed it also. After 
I returned home 1 wanted to be alone 
and meditate, and shed tears of joy 
over the truth I had heard proclaim- 
ed, for my cup was running over. My 
desire was to make plain to others 
just what 1 saw and felt. Gladly 
would 1 have done so, but it is not in 
the power of an individual to impart 
this life and light to another, for every 
good gift and every perfect gift comes 
down from above, from the Father of 
lights. By grace only, are we saved, 
and that not of ourselves, it is the gift 
of God. 

At times I feel that the Lord has 
hid his face from me, and 1 do not 
feel worthy to call on his name, and 
tribulations arise, which work in me 
patience : and patience, experience ; 
and experience, hope: and hope mak- 
eth not ashamed : because the love of 
God is sued abroad in our hearts by 
the Holy Ghost which is given unto 
us. We are commanded not to for- 
sake the assembling of ourselves to- 
gether, as the manner of some is ; and 
when we heed this command we often 
find a blessing and sweet communion 
in these heavenly places here below. 
Before T joined the church I thought 
for awhile, that I could live as well 
away from the brethren as with them, 
and did stay away from their fellow- 
ship till I felt to be a lone wanderer 
without a home. Twice, in dreams, T 
■aw mvMlf baptiz««L, b«f«r« I • ff«rt«l 



ETON'S LANDMARK. 



11* 



to the church. I now enjoy my home 
with the brethren and feel that I could 
not well exist without them, but won- 
der how they can fellowship me. 

Pray for me and mine. 

Your little sister 1 hope, 

HATTIE DEAL COOPER. 

Nashville, N. C. 



THREE BOOKS OF INTEREST 

Have You Read Them? 

Biographical History of Baptist 
Ministers 

containing nearly 1000 sketches. 381 pictures of 
Ministers. Deacons, and talented Sisters, together 
with an Appendix of much useful information- 
Price $2.00. 



Also Theodosia Irnest, The Heroine of 
Faith, and Ten Days in Search 
of The Church 

both these books in one volume and contains 637 
pages. No work of its size and cost is a better 
defense of Bible doctrine and practice, or sets the 
ONE CHURCH CHRIST BUILT in fairer color.. 

Price $1.25, 

These Books are well printed on good paper, sub- 
stantially and neatly bound, and above all they 
are HIGHLY ENDORSED by Elders Hassell. 
Cash. Thompson. Gold. Waters, Dalton, Chick. 
Hurst. Webb. Lester Cayce, Branscome. Norton. 
Stewart. Henderson. Hanks. Durand. Daily. 
Moore. Oliphant. Lundy. Morris, Hardy. Rauls- 
ton. Pope. Mewborn, Gilbert. Farmer. Denny. 
Elklns. and Hundreds of Other Ministers and 
Editors the Country Over. 

As Loni As They Last Both Volumes will b. 
sent together for $2.75 and if you are not pleased 
with your purchase they may be returned in good 
order and money will be refunded. 

Send all orders to 

R. H. PITTMAN, Luray, Va. 



LLOYD'S HYMN BOOKS. 

Plain Sheep Binding 75 cents. 1 
dozen $7.50. 

Plain Morocco Binding 95 cants. 1 
dozen $10.00. 

Gilt Morocco Binding, single eepy 
$1.15. 1 dozen $12.00. 

No less than half dozen sold at doz- 
en rates. 

MRS. M. E. ATKINS, 
185J W. 43rd St.. 
Los Angeles, (Sal 
J. ALYIN OLARK, 
UhI Afftat, Wiliii, If. C. 



Send us your Minutes and Book and 
Job work. AVe do it with neatness and 

despatch. 

P. D. GOLD PUB. CO. 



NEW ARRANGEMENT. 

We are still publishing the OH 
School Baptist Hymn and Tune Boek, 
both shape note and round note, 70 
cents for single copy, $6.50 a dozen, 
transportation prepaid. Send orders 
to Elder Silas H. Durand, Southamp 
ton, Pa., or to Elder P. G. Lester. 
Lloyd, Va. 



Send u yeur Jeb Priatimf . 



FOURTEENTH EDITION OF SHAPE 
NOTES. 

We are getting out the Fourteenth 

Edition of Shape Notes of our Hymn 
and Tune Books which will soon be 
ready for distribution The price ii 
70 cents each, sent by mail, and six 
dollars per dozen sent by express at 
cost of purchaser. 

There will be sent with each book, 
upon request, without additional cost, 
a neat pamphlet of 30 pages, contain- 
ing rudiments of music, and graded 
lessons for use in singing classes, in 
connection with the Hymn and Tmne 
Book. Send orders to Elder Silas H. 
Duraud- Southampton, Pa., or Elder P. 
G. Lester, Floyd, Va., or to Elder P. D. 
Gold, Wilson, N. C. 



If you wish to read a highly enter- 
taining book of about 80 pages — priee 
50 cents — descriptive of characters 
both true and false, as set forth in the 
Bible, send for this book. 

ELDER F. W. KEENE, 
North Berwick, Maine. 



Send us your printing. Work eloae 
neatly and promptly. P. D. Ck 



214 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Nerves. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

CONNERSVILLE, IND., 

R. No. 1, Box G., 

Agents Wanted. 



father Bed Bargains 



••i IV v.i i ..low Co. Dcpi, G Crenisboro, X. C. 



FOR INFORMATION. 
For information and for reference 
we would be pleased to have a Minute 
of every Primitive Baptist Association 
in America and will thank the Clerks 
of the various Associations to forward 
one to ine at their earliest possible 
convenience. 



NOTICE. 

Bro. W. R. Dodd, Whitmell, Va., 
has kindly offered to send in subscrip- 
tions for The Landmark, and those 
desiring to subscribe or renew their 
subscription can give him the money. 
A receipt card will be mailed to each 
direct for amount paid. 

P. D. G. 

Wilson, N. C. 



MOORE'S MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Last summer my health became 
very poor. 1 went to Moore's Miner- 
al Springs, in Stokes County, N. C, 
remaining there iibout 12 days, I re- 
turned Lome well. 

This water acts on the blood, the 
skin, the bowels, kidneys, stomach, 
catarrh, &c. 

I gladly recommend this water to 
the sick. Hotel open winter and sum- 
mer. Water chipped from Rural Hall, 
N. C, at $1.50 per case of 12 half gal- 
lons and cases to be returned in '60 
days. 

P. D. GOLD. 




REQUEST. 

We are in need of money to pay ex- 
penses. While war is raging in the 
East we need money as much as if 
there were no war. We can help each 
other by paying debts. Please send 
on what is due on the Landmark, and 
let each one pay his debts, as far as 
possible, and this will help to relieve 
the distress. 

p. d. a. 



ENTERTAINING BOOK 

I have made an arrangement for s 
▼ery nice Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. GOLD, 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



WEBSTER'S 
NEW 
INTERNATIONAL 
DICTIONARY 

THE MERRIAM WEBSTER 

The Only New unabridged dic- 
tionary in many years. 

Contains the pith and essence 
of an authoritative library. 
Covers every field of knowl- 
edge. An Encyclopedia in a 
single book. 

The Only Dictionary with the 
New Divided Pafe. 

400,000 Word*. 27C0 Pages. 
6000 Illustrations. Cost nearly 
half a million dollars. 

Let us tell you about this most 
remarkable single volume. 

Write for sample 
pases, full par- 
ticulars, etc. 



Erder J. T. Collier's address ' i« 
changes from Kenly, N. C, R. F. D. to 
Micro, N. C. 




Cancer Cured at the Kellam Hospital. 

The record of tha Kelam Hospital 
is without parallel in hi3tory, having 
cured without the use of the Knife, 
Acids, X-Ray or Radium, over ninety 
per cent, of the many hundreds of 
sufferers from Cancer which It has 
treated during the past eighteen 
years. We want every man and wom- 
an in the United States to know what 
we are doing. KELLAM HOSPITAL, 
1617 W. Main St., Richmond, Va. 
Write for literature. 



Easy Breathing a Luxury 

To persons afflicted with catarrh or 
severe head colds the difficulty of 
breathing is a great burden. 

The defec i; ve aeration of the blood, 
through lack of contact between the 
air inhaled and the mucous mem- 
brane of the lungs, produces head- 
aches, depression and lower health 
conditions, because the blood is not 
properly purified. 

Under such conditions Menthola- 
turn should be applied within the nos- 
trils. Its aromatic oils penetrate to 
the membranes and tickle them to 
greater activity. 

The secretions become more active, 
loosening the coagulations which cov- 
er the membranes, encouraging the 
clearing of the air passages. 

Then comes the good fresh air in 
satisfying volume, direct to the mem- 
branes, purifying the blood. 

Mentholatum is antiseptic and ger- 
micidal ( encouraging the restoration 
of inflamed parts, and has proven 
very useful as well in relieving croup, 
sore throat and chapped skin. 



Send us your Job Printing. 



We want your business in the 
way of Priat ? ng, and will stviv? 
to please you. Send us your Job 
Printing and be convinced 

RHEUMATISM AND INDIGESTION 



Practically all physicians and medi- 
cal writers are agreed that there is 
a close relationship between Indiges- 
tion and Rheumatism. This view is 
substantiated by the fact that Shivar 
Spring water, which is probably the 
best American mineral water for Dy- 



H©N*S 



»»«psi«. a»d Indigestion, relieve* 
Rheumatism and the Rheumatoid 
diseases, such as Gout, Sciatica, Neu- 
ralgia and Nervous Headache. All of 
these diseases are probably related 
and all are probably due in whole or 
in part to imperfect digestion or to 
imperfect assimilation of food. Phy- 
sicians who have studied this water 
and who have observed its effects in 
their practice believe that it relieves 
these maladies by rendering the di- 
gestion complete and perfect and 
thereby preventing the formation of 
those poisons which inflame the joints 
and irritate the nerves, and also by 
•liminr.ting, through the kidneys such 
poisons as have already been formed. 

The following letters are interest- 
ing in this connection. Dr. Crosby, 
a South Carolina physician, writes: — 
"I have tested your Spring Water in 
several cases of Rheumatism, Chron- 
ic Indigestion, Kidney and Bladder 
troubles and in Nervous and Sick 
Headaches and find that it has acted 
nicely in each case and I believe that 
if used continuously for a reasonable 
time, will produce a permanent cure. 
It will purify the blood, relieve debili- 
ty, stimulate the action of the Liver, 
Kidneys and Bladder, aiding them in 
throwing off all poisonous matter." 

Dr. Avant of Savannah writes: — "I 
suffered for years with a most aggra- 
vating form of stomach disorder and 
consulted a number of our best local 
physicians, went to Baltimore and 
consulted specialists there and still I 
was not benefited. I had about de- 
spaired of living when I began to use 
Shivar Spring Water and In a short 
time was cured." 

Mr. Rhodes of Virginia writes: — 
"Please send me ten gallons of Shivar 
Spring Water quickly. I want It for 
Rheumatism. I know of several who 



were cured of Jtheu»atl«» witk 

water." 

Editor Cunningham writes: — "The 
water has done more good than any 
medicine I have ever taken for Rheu- 
matism. Am entirely free from pain." 

Mr. McClam of South Carolina 
writes:— "My wife has been a suffer- 
er from Rheumatism and after drink- 
ing twenty gallons of your Mineral 
Water was entirely cured of the hor- 
rible disease." 

Mr. Carter of Virginia writes: — 
"Mrs. Carter has had enlarged joints 
upon her hands, caused by Rheuma- 
tism. Shivar Spring Water removed 
every trace of the enlargement. The 
water is simply excellent." 

If you suffer with Rheumatism or 
with any chronic disease, accept the 
guarantee offer below by signing your 
name. Clip and mall to ♦he 
Shivar Spring, 

Box 55-S, Shelton, S. C. 

Gentlemen:— I accept your guaran- 
tee offer and enclose herewith two 
dollars for ten gallons (two five-gal- 
lon demijohns) of Shivar Spring Wa- 
ter. I agree to give the water a fair 
trial in accordance with instructions 
which you will send, and if I derive 
no benefit you are to refund the price 
in full upon receipt of the two empty 
demijohns, which I agree to return 
promptly. 

Name 

Post Office 

Express Office 

(Please write distinctly.) 

Note: — The advertising manager of 
Zion's Landmark is personally ac- 
quainted with Mr. Shivar. You run 
no risk whatever in accepting his 
offer. I have personally witnessed 
the remarkable curative effects of 
this water in a very serious case. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHEED SEMI-MONTHLY 
AT 

% WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

PriMtive or Old School Baptist 

VOL. XLVIII. WILSON, N. C, APRIL 1, 1915. NO. 10. 



P. D. GOLD, Editor Wilson, N. 0. 

P. Q. LESTER, Asso. Editor Floyd, Va. 

$1.50 PER YEAR. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 



"Ask for tke eld paths whsre is the good way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the 
ancient landmark, guided hy its etches of Truth, and 
strengthened hy its eords of lore. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institntions of men, 
and regard only the Bihle as the standard of trath. 

It urges the people to aearoh the scriptures, and obey 
fesas, the King in the Holy Hill of Son, leaping them- 
wivea unspotted from the world. 

It aisM to eoatond for the mystery of the faith in dad, 
Urn Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, fee 
Messed Comforter. 

KOTI01I 

When a sabseriber desires his paper changed ho should 
state plainly both the old and now pootomees. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what Is due, and also 
state his poetoiiae. 

Lot oaeh sabseriber pay for his paper in advance if pos- 
sible, and when he renews giro the same name it has been 
going in, unless he wishes it ehangod, then he shenld state 
both the old and the now names. 

if the money sent has not been receipted, please inform 
me of it. When you ean always send money by money order 
or sheek, or draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Bach subscriber ean toll the time to which he paid tor the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

All names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All levers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if 
so impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers 
af truth. 

Afl eenuttunieetiens, business letters, remittances of P. O. 
Orders, money, drafts, etc., shonSd be sent to 



P. D. SOLD. Wfieon. H. 0. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



CRUMBS FROM TFU MASTER'S 
TABLE. 

Our brethren in England, with the 
English nation are now involved in a 
terrific war; and the whole world is 
affected by it.— P. D. G. 

" ' Come, my people, enter thou into 
thy chambers, and shut thy doors 
about thee : hide thyself as it were for 
a little moment, until the indignation 
be over-past." — Isa. xxvi. 20. 

Godly men make God Himself their 
hiding-place, to Him they have still be- 
taken themselves in all ages, as often 
as calamities have befallen the world, 
Ps. xlvi. 1. "God is our refuge and 
strength, a very present help in 
trouble." As chickens run under the 
wings of the hen for safety when the 
kite hovers over them, so do they fly to 
their God for sanctuary, Ps. lvi. 3. "At 
what time I am afraid, I will trust in 
Thee;" q. d. "Lord, if a storm of 
trouble at any time overtake me, I will 
make bold to come under Thy roof for 
shelter;" and indeed not so bold as 
welcome. It is no presumption in them 
after so gracious an invitation from 
their God, "Come, My people, enter 
thou into thy chambers." 

My friends, a sound of trouble is in 
our ears, the clouds gather and black- 
en upon us more and more : distress of 
nations with perplexity seems to be 
near, our day hastens to an end, and 



the shadows of the night are stretching 
forth upon us. "What greater service 
therefore can I do for your souls, than 
by the light of this scripture (as with 
a candle in my hand) to lead you to 
your chambers, and show you your 
longings in the attributes and 
promises of God, before I take my 
leave of you, and bid you good night? 
0 .with what satisfaction should I part 
with you, were I but sure to leave you 
under Christ's wings! It was Christ's 
lamentation over Jerusalem that they 
should be gathered under his 
wings, when the Roman eagle ready to 
hover over that city; and you know 
how dear they paid for their obstinacy 
and infidelity. Be warned by that 
dreadful example, and among the rest 
of your mercies bless God heartily for 
this, that so sweet a voice sounds from 
heaven in your ears this day, this day 
of frights and troubles; "Come, My 
people, enter thou into thy chambers," 
&c. 

This chapter contains a lovely song, 
fitted for the lips of God's Israel, not- 
withstanding their sad captivity; for 
their God was with them in Babylon, 
and cheered their hearts there with 
many promises of deliverance ; and in 
the mystical sense it relates to the New 
Testament churches, of whose troubles, 
protections, and deliverances, the Jews 
in Babylon were a type. This chapter, 
though full of excellent and seasonable 
truths, will be too long to analyse; it 



218 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



shall suffice to search back only to the 
17th verse, where you find the poor 
captivated church under despondency 
of mind, comparing her condition to 
that of a woman in travail, who hath 
many sharp pains and bitter throes, 
yet cannot be delivered, much like that 
in 2 Kings xix. 3 : " The children are 
come to the birth, and there is not 
enough to bring forth. ' ' 
. .Against this discouragment a doable 
relief is applied in the following ver- 
ses ; the one is a promise of full deliver- 
ance at last, the other an invitaiton in- 
to a sure sanctuary and place of de- 
fence for the present, until the time of 
their full deliverance came. The prom- 
ise we have in verse 19: "Thy dead 
men shall live; together with My dead 
body shall they arise : awake and sing, 
ye that dwell in the dust," &c. Their 
captivity was a civil death, and Baby- 
lon as a grave to them. So it is else- 
where described, Ezek. xxxvii, 1, 2, 3,' 
14: "I will open your graves, and 
cause you to come out of your graves, 
and bring you into the land of Israel." 
And therefore their deliverance is car- 
ried under the notion of a resurrection 
in that promise. 

Object. Yea, (might they rely,) the 
hopes of deliverance at last is some 
comfort, but alas, that may bo far o : 
how shall we subsist till ihe:i? 

Solut. Well enough, fur as you 
have in that promise a sure ground of 
deliverance at last, so in the interim 
here is a gracious invitation in to a 
place of security for the present. 
' ' Come, My people, enter thou into thy 
chambers." In which invitation four 
things call for our close attention. 

1. The form of the invitation, in- 
cluding in it the qualified subject, 
"Come, My people." God's own pe- 
culiar people, who have chosen God 
for their protection, and resigned up 
themselves sincerely to Him in the 
covenant, are the persons here invited, 
the same which He before called "the 



righteous nation that kept the truth," 
ver. 2. He means those that remain- 
ed faithful to God, as many of them 
did in Babylon. Witness their sorrow 
for Zion, Ps. cxxxvii. pex totum; and 
their solemn appeal to God, that their 
hearts were not turned back nor had 
their steps declined, though they were 
sore broken in the place of dragons, 
and covered with the shadow of death, 
Vs. xliv. 18, 19, 20. These are the peo- 
ple invited to the chambers of secur- 
ity. And the form of invitation is full 
of tender compassion; "Come, My 
people;" like a tender father who 
sees a storm coming upon his children 
in the fields, and takes them by the 
hand saying, "Come away, my dear 
ehildren, hasten home Avith me, lest the 
storm over-take you;" or as the Lord 
said to Noah before the deluge, "Come 
thou and all thy house into the ark;" 
and God shut him in, Gen. vii. 1, 16. 
This is the form of invitation, "Come, 
My people." 

2. The privilege invited to: "Enter 
thou into thy chambers." There is 
some variety, and indeed variety rath- 
er than contrariety, in the exposition of 
these words. In this all are agreed, 
that by their chambers is not meant 
the chambers of their own houses 
(Ezek. xxi. 11,) for alas, their houses 
were left unto them desolate ; and if 
not, yet they could be no security to 
them now, when neither their own 
houses nof their fortified city was ab- 
le to defend them before. * * * * 

By chambers therefore, others un- 
derstand the chambers of divine pro- 
vidence, where the saints are held in 
evil days. So our annotators on the 
place ; and no doubt but this is in part 
the special intendment of the text. 

Others understand the attributes 
and promises of God, to be here meant, 
as well as His providence. And I con- 
ceive all three make the sense of the 
text full ; i. e., the divine attributes en- 
gaged in the promises, and exercised 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



219 



or actuated in the providences of God ; 
these are the sanctuaries and refuges 
of God's people in days of trouble. 
Calvin understands it of the quiet re- 
pose of the believer's mind in God; 
but that is rather the effect of his se- 
curity, than the place of it. It is God's 
attributes, or His name (which is the 
same thing,) to which the righteous 
Hy and are safe. (Prov. xviii. 10.) 

Object. But you will say, why are 
they called their chambers? Those at- 
tributes are not theirs, but God's. 

Solut. The answer is easy; though 
they be God's properties, yet they are 
His people's privileges and benefits; 
for when God makes over Himself to 
them in covenant to be their God, He 
doth, as it were, deliver to them the 
keys of all His attributes for their ben- 
efit and security ; and is as if He 
should say, "My wisdom is yours, to 
contrive for your" good ; My power is 
yours, to protect your persons; My 
mercy yours, to forgive your sins ; My 
all-sufficiency yours to supply your 
wants ; all that I am, and all that I 
have, is for your benefit and com- 
fort." These are the chambers pro- 
vided for the saints' lodgings, and in- 
to these they are invited to enter. 

"Enter thou into thy chambers."' 
By entering into them understand 
their actual faith exercised in ads of 
affiance and resignation to God in all 
their dangers. So Ps. lvi. 3. "At 
what time I am afraid (saith David) I 
will trust in Thee : " q. d. " Lord, if a 
storm come I will make bold to shelter 
myself from it under Thy wings by 
faith." Look, as unbelief shuts the 
doors of all God's attributes and prom- 
ises against us, so faith opens them all. 
to the soul ; and so much of the privi - 
lege invited to, which is the second 
thing. 

3. We have here a needful caution 
for the securing of this privilege, to 
ourselves in evil times, "Shut thy 
doors about thee." Or as the Syriac 



renders it, behind or after thee. 

Clare must be taken that no passage 
be left open for the devil to creep in 
after us, and drive us out of our ref- 
uge. For so it falls out too often with 
God's people when they are at rest in 
God's name or promises; Satan creeps 
in by unbelieving doubts and puzzling 
objections, and beats them out of their 
refuge back again into trouble. It is 
therefore of great concernment, in 
such times especially, not to give place 
to the devil, as the phrase is, Eph. iv. 
27, but cleave to God by a resolved re- 
liance. 

4. Lastly, We are to note with 
what arguments or motives they are 
pressed to betake themselves to this 
refuge. There are two found in the 
text, the one working upon their fear, 
the other upon their hope. 1. That 
which works upon their fear is a sup- 
position of a storm coming, the indig- 
nation of God will fall like. a tempest. 
This is supposed in the text, and plain- 
ly expressed in the words following, 
"For the Lord cometh out of His place 
to punish the inhabitants of the earth," 
ver. 21. 2. The other is fitted to work 
upon their hope, though his indignation 
fall like a storm, yet it will not con- 
tinue long ; it shall be but for a mo- 
ment, better days and more comfort- 
able dispensations will follow. From 
all which the general observation is 
this :— 

Doct. That the attributes, promises 
and providences of God are the cham- 
bers of rest and security, in which His 
people are to hide themselves, when 
they foresee the storms of His indigna- 
tion coming upon the world. 

"The name of the Lord (saith Solo- 
mon) is a strong tower; the righteous 
run into it, and are safe," (Prov. xviii. 
10.) And His attributes are His name, 
Exod. xxxiv. 5. For by them He is 
known as a man is known by his name, 
and this His name is a strong tower for 
His People's security. Now what is 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



the use and end of a tower in a city, 
but to receive and secure the inhabi- 
tants when the outworks are beaten to 
the ground, the wall scaled, and the 
houses left desolate ? And as it is here 
resembled to a tower, so in Isa. xxxiii. 
16 it is shadowed out unto us by a 
munition of rocks, "His place of de- 
fence shall be a munition of rocks." 
How secure is that person that is en- 
vironed with rocks on every side? 
"Yea," you will say, "but yet a rock 
is but a cold and barren refuge ; 
though other enemies cannot, yet hun- 
ger and thirst can invade and kid him 
there." No, in this rock is a store 
house of provision, as well as a maga- 
zine for defence ; so it follows, ' ' Bread 
shall be given him, and his water shall 
be sure." 

And sometimes it is resembled to us 
by the wings of a fowl, spread with 
much tenderness over her young for 
their defence, Ps. lvii. 1: "Yea, in the 
shadow of Thy wings will I make my 
refuge, until these calamities be o ver- 
past." So Ps. xvii. 8: "Keep me as 
the apple of Thine eye, hide me under 
the shadow of Thy wings." No pan 
of the body hath more guards upun it 
than the apple of the eye. God is as 
careful to preserve His people as men 
are to preserve their eyes ; and he that 
toucheth them toucheth the apple of 
His eye. But we need not go from one 
metaphor to another to show you 
where the saint's refuge is in time of 
danger ; you have a whole bundle oi 
them lying together in that one scrip- 
ture, Ps. xviii. 2: "The Lord is my 
rock, and my fortress, and my deliv- 
erer; my God, my strength, iu wlv n T 
will trust; my buckler, and the horn 
of my salvation, and my high tower:'' 
where you find all kinds of defence, 
whether natural or artifiold, undrr a 
pleasant variety of apt, -noviphors, 
ascribed to God for the ..vurily of Lis 
people. 

N*w f«r tk« «*sfcuig »f tki% fr«at 



point into as easy and profitable ;i 
method as I can, I shall resolve this 
general truth into these following 
propositions, which are implied or ex- 
pressed in the text and doctrine th.mce 
deduced: 

1. That there are times aucl seasons 
appointed by God for the pouring out 
of His indignation upon the world. 

2. That God's own people are con- 
cerned in, and ought to be affected 
with those judgments. 

3. That God hath a special and par- 
ticular care of His people in the days 
of His indignation. 

4. That God usually premonishes 
the world, especially His own people, 
of His judgments before they befall 
them. 

5. That God's attributes, promise", 
and providences are. prepared for the 
security , of His people, in the greatest 
distresses that befall them in the 
world. 

6. That none but God's people ?re 
taken into those chambers of security, 
or can expect His special protection in 
evil times. 

And then I shall apply the whole in 
the proper uses of it. 

1. That there are times and seas.uis 
appointed by God for the pouring rut 
of His indignation upon the worM. 

Sect. 1. This is plainly implied in 
the text, that there are times of indig- 
nation appointed to befall the world ; 
yea, and more than this; not only that 
such times shall come, but the durat; «n 
and continuance is also under an ap- 
pointment. "Hide thyself for a few 
moment, until the indignation be over- 
past." The prophet tells us in Zeph ii. 
2 that these stormy times are under a 
decree; and that decree is there com- 
pared to a pregnant womaxi which is 
to go out her appointed months, and 
then to travail and bring forth: even 
so it is in the judgments God brings 
upon the world. . We see them not in 
tk« AtijM «f pr»v»«ati»M ; but all tkis 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



821 



while they are in the womb of the de- 
cree, and at the appointed season they 
shall become visible to the world. As 
there are in nature fair, halcyon days, 
and cloudy, over-cast, and stormy: so 
it is in providences, Eccl. vii. 14: "God 
hath set the one over against the 
other. * * * * 

And this appointment of times of 
distress is both profitable and neces- 
sary for the world, especially God's 
own people in it. 

In general, hereby the Being and 
righteousness of God is cleared and 
vindicated against the atheism and in- 
fidelity of the world, Ps. ix. 16. "The 
Lord is known by the judgments that 
He executeth." Impunity is the occa- 
sion of many atheistical thoughts in 
the world ***** "When Thy judg- 
ments are in the earth, the inhabitants 
of the world will learn righteousness." 
Those sermons that God preaches from 
heaven by the terrible voice of His 
judgments, startle and rouse the se- 
cure world more than all the warnings 
and exhortations of His ministers 
could ever do. Those that slept se- 
curely under our ministry, will fear 
and tremble under His rods; those 
that are without faith, are not without 
sense and feeling; their own eyes will 
affect their hearts, though our words 
could make no impression on them. 

Sect. 2. But of what use soever 
these national judgments- are to others, 
to be sure they shall be beneficial to 
God's own people. When others die 
by fear, they shall live by faith ; if 
they be baneful poison to the wicked, 
they shall be healthful physic to the 
godly. For. 

1. By these calamities God will 
mortify and purge their corruptions; 
this winter weather shall be useful to 
destroy and rot those rank weeds 
which the summer of prosperity bred, 
Isa. xxvii. 9: "By this therefore shall 
the iniquity of Jacob be purged." 

2. National judgment* drive the 



people of God nearer to Him and to 
one another; they drive the people of 
God to their knees, and make them 
pray more frequently, more fervently, 
a u.d more feelingly than they ever 
were wont to do. In this posture you 
find them in ver. 8, 9 of this chapter: 
"Yea, in the way of Thy judgments, 

0 Lord, have we waited for Thee ; the 
desire of our souls is to Thy name, 
and to the remembrance of Thee. With 
my soul have 1 desired Thee in the 
night; yea, with my spirit within me 
will I seek Thee early." 

3. In a word, by these distractions 
and distresses of nations, the people of 
God are more weaned from the world, 
and made to long more vehemently af- 
ter heaven; being now convinced by 
experience that this is not their rest. 
When all things are tranquil and pros- 
perous, God's own people are but too 
apt to fall asleep and dream of pleas- 
ure and rest on earth; to say as Job 
in his prosperity, "1 shall die in my 
nest, I shall multiply my days as the 
sand." And then are their heads and 
hearts filled with many projects and 
designs to promote their comforts, and 
make provision for their accommoda- 
tions on earth : the multiplicity of 
earthly cares and comforts take up 
their time and thoughts too much, and 
make them that they mind death and 
eternity too little. But saith God, 
"This must not be so, things must not 
go on at this rate, the prosperous 
world must not thus enchant my people : 

1 must embitter the earth, that I may 
thereby sweeten heaven the more to 
them ; when they find no rest below, 
they will surely seek it above." 

These, and such like, are the grac- 
ious designs and ends of God in shak- 
ing the world by His terrible judg- 
ments. * * * * And such is the merciful 
nature of God, that He oft-times turns 
awaj His anger from His people, when 
it seems ready to pour down upon 
them, Ps. lwviii. 38. The consider*- 



222 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



tion whereof no way indulges secur- 
ity, but encourages to repentance and 
greater fervency in prayer. 

2. That God's own people are much 
concerned in, and ought to be suitably 
affected with those judments that be- 
fall the nation wherein they live. 

Sect. 1. If God's people have no 
concernment in these things, why are 
they , called upon in this text to turn 
into their chambers, hide themselves, 
and shut their doors, till the indigna- 
tion be over-past? Certainly though 
God hath better provided for them 
than others, yet they are two ways 
concerned in these cases as much as 
others : viz., i. Upon a political ; ii. 
Upon a religious account. 

1. Upon a political account, as they 
are members of the community, and so 
are equally concerned in the good or 
evil that befalls the nation in which 
they live * * * * Grace is above all haz- 
ards, but creature-enjoyments and 
comforts are not. The sins of the So- 
domites involve not only their own 
houses and estates, but Lot's also, in 
the ruin and overthrow; wicked men 
often fare the better for the company 
of the godly, and the godly often fare 
the worse for the company of the 
wicked. And it is not to be wondered 
at, if we consider that even the saints 
themselves have a hand in the provoca- 
tion of these judgments, as well as 
others, Duet, xxxii. 19 : "And when the 
Lord saw it, He abhorred them, be- 
cause of the provoking of His sons and 
of his daughters." We have contri- 
buted to the common heap of guilt, and 
therefore must justify God if we par- 
take with others in the common calam- 
ity. 

2. They are greatly concerned in 
such judgments upon a religious and 
christian account, for it is usual for 
the flood of God's judgments not on- 
ly to sweep away our civil and natural, 
but our spiritual and best enjoyments 
aad eomforts. Tkus the ordinances of 



God ceased in Babylon; and there the 
faithful bewailed their misery upon 
that account, Ps. exxxvii. : "We wept 
when we remembered thee, 0 Zion." 
Not only Israel ties, but the ark is 
taken prisoner by the enemy, 1 Sam. 
iv. 11. And you find the people of God 
more deeply concerned upon this ac- 
count than for all their outward loss; 
and other sufferings; Zeph. iii. 18: "1 
will gather them of thee that are sor- 
rowful for the solemn assemblies, to 
whom the reproach of it was a bur- 
den." For by how much our souls 
are more excellent than our bodies, 
and the concerns of eternity over-bal- 
ance those of time ; by so much the 
more are we concerned in the loss of 
our spiritual, more than of our tem- 
poral mercies and enjoyments. 

Grace indeed cannot be lost, but the 
means and instruments by which it is 
begotten may; the golden candlestick 
is one of the moveables in God's house, 
Rev. ii. 5. 

Thus you see a two-fold concernment 
that the people of God have in the ef- 
fects of national judgments. 

Sec. 2. This being so, how should 
all that fear God be affected with the 
appearances and signs of His indigna- 
tion. So Avas David, Ps. cxix. 120: 
"My flesh trembles for fear of thee; 
and I am afraid of Thy judgments." 
He that feared not a bear, a lion, a Go- 
liath, yet trembleth at God's judgment. 
So did Habakkuk (iii. 16:) "When I 
heard, my belly trembled, my lips quiv- 
ered at the voice, rottenness entered 
into my bones," — expressions denot- 
ing the deepest seizures of fear and 
greatest consternations. Not that I 
would persuade you to such slavish 
fear or unchristian dejection as it is 
not only sinful in itself, but the cause 
and inlet of many other sins; but to a 
due sense both of the evils of misery 
that will befall the nation when God's 
indignation comes upon it and the evils 
of sin that have incensed it; and to 



SIGN'S LANDMARK. 



such a fear of. both as may seasonably 
awaken us to the use of all preventing 
remedies. And, First, 

1. 0 that all would lay to heart the 
national miseries that God's indigna- 
tion threatens upon us! It is said, Ps. 
cvii. 34: '"A fruitful land is turned in- 
to barrenness for the wickedness of 
them that dwell therein." * * * 

2. You that are the people of God 
ought to be deeply affected with the 
spiritual miseries that threaten us in 
the day of God's indignation. Do you 
consider what the removing the can- 
dlestick out of its place is ? A depart- 
ing gospel, the going down of the sun 
upon the prophets, the loss of your 
sweet sabbaths and gospel feasts, and 
the gross darkness of Popery to ii 11 the 
earth. 0 it is hard parting with these 
things ! It is said, 1 Sam. vii. 2, when 
the ark was removed, "that all the 
house of Israel lamented after the 
Lord." Pity your own souls, and be 
deeply affected with th« misery of 
others, the poor Christless world, who 
are like to perish for want of vision, 
Prov. xxix. 18. 

3. But especially labour to affect 
your hearts with the sins that have in- 
censed God's indignation. So did the 
saints in Jerusalem, Ezek. ix. 4; they 
sighed and mourned for all the abom- 
inations committed in it. So did Lot, 
2 Pet. ii. 7: "He vexed his righteous 
soul from day to day." So did David, 
Ps. cxix. 136 ! ' ' Rivers of water run 
down mine eyes, because men keep not 
Thy law." 0 who that loves God can 
refrain tears, to see the God of pity, 
the God of tender mercies, a Father 
full of bowels of compassion, so in- 
censed and provoked to indignation ! 
Oh, it is a. heart-melting consideration 
where there is any ingenuity. If our 
afflictions grieve God to the heart, as 
it doth, Judges x. 16, our souls should 
be grieved for His dishonour. 

4. To conclude, get upon your 
hearts such a sense of God's indigna- 



tion as may quicken you to the use of 
preventing duties. So Amos iv. 12 : 
"Because I will do this, prepare to 
meet thy God, 0 Israel. ' ' So the prop- 
het, Zeph. ii 1, 2: "Gather yourselves 
before the decree bring forth." It was 
.Moses' honour to stand in the breach, 
Ts. cvi. 23. And Abraham's to plead 
so with God, though he did not pre- 
vail. 



A NOTABLE EVENT. 

Elder P. D. Gold, My Beloved Bro.— 
1 am reminded by the rapid flight of 
time of the promise 1 made you last 
December that 1 would write you for 
publication in Zion's Landmark a 
narrative of the unhappy trouble that 
arose in one of the churches of the 
Warwick Association some ninety-five 
years ago and its glorious, remai'k- 
able, interesting and very sudden end- 
ing. 

Two prominent male members of 
the church became very much at var- 
iance with each other about some 
very trivial matter, as is often the 
case when serious trouble afflicts the 
church of God. Each brother had his 
friends who took sides respectively in 
this trouble. 

As time passed on a great deal of 
fleshly feeling was constantly being 
manifested and the trouble that a 
short time before was but a small mat- 
ter, now in consequence of the fleshly 
feeling of the brethren being wrought 
up to a high pitch, was assuming 
alarming proportions. 

After many ineffectual attempts to 
get these two erring brethren together, 
and in fact to effect a reconciliation 
between them, it seemed that nearly 
the whole church was now sadly in- 
volved, and for some wise, yet, then 
very mysterious purpose, the Lord was 
pleased to withdraw from His dear 
people for a time His restraining grace 
and this let Satan take supreme con- 



234 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



trol of this lively body of people, and 
it was his delight to hold them in com- 
plete captivity for a time. 

in our love and sympathy, as well 
as anxiety for our dear kindred in 
Christ, being "moved by the afflic- 
tions of Joseph," we attempt some- 
times, but in vain, to scan the dark 
and inscrutable providences of God to 
know His purpose in His peculiar deal- 
ings with His dear people. But how 
good is the Lord and how incompre- 
hensibly great is that precious gift of 
our God that enables such poor sin- 
ful creatures as we are to view all 
the hard-dealings of our God with us 
as just and right, though through the 
weakness of the flesh we may be un- 
abled to be fully reconciled yet pos- 
sess the desire to be. 

A very important period in the his- 
tory of this church, to which I am now 
calling your attention had arrived, 
when and where the Lord was about 
to make such a display of His Al- 
mighty power, as well as His mercy, 
that sinners as well as saints, the peo- 
ple of the world, as well as His dear 
children, were compelled to acknowl- 
edge His Almighty power alone. 

Looking back through the vista of 
time, some niney-five years perhaps, to 
an ever-memorable period when our 
fathers and mothers in Israel, with 
many others, were accustomed to meet 
for the worship of God and before 
whom, and to whom, God's eternal 
truth was_ faithfully proclaimed, then 
as it is now, and we see God's favored 
hand plainly manifested, in that He 
delivered from the dark chasm, of al- 
most despair and destruction, a noble 
band of brethren, followers of the 
meek and lowly Jesus, but who, for 
the time being, had forgotten, seem- 
ingly, "The rock from whence they 
had been hewn, and the pit from which 
they had been digged," and had been 
permitted to be taken captive by the 
devil; for they were not now clothed 



in the robe of righteousness nor were 
they formed in their right minds when 
assembling for worship, but instead, 
had put on the habiliments of war; 
and now with battle axes and spears, 
with which Satan always arms his 
captives, they were permitted to en- 
ter where Zion holds her solemn courts 
professedly to worship the God of 
peace and salvation, but unfortunate- 
ly for their peace and comfort in real- 
ity to serve the enemy in all unright- 
eousness. 

They had now evidently arrived at 
the "lied Sea" in their situation and, 
in darkness and despair, seeing noth- 
ing ahead but death and destruction 
to their comfort, wondered how they 
were to be delivered from their direful 
situation into the glad harbor cf de- 
sired peace. 

Well advanced arguments, clothed 
with words full of instruction and sol- 
emn warning, fell heedlessly at the 
feet of these captive brethren. The 
oil that was tenderly poured upon 
these troubled waters seemed to pos- 
sess no healing effect, for God had de- 
termined to show His mighty power, 
in that effectual manner, that foes as 
well as friends, must and should ac- 
knowledge His ruling power, alone. 
His Satanic Majesty revelling in the 
power of his strength, and riding from 
conquering, almost unto conquer seem- 
ed well satisfied with his wretched work 
of worrying the dear people of God, 
the church that was now so terribly 
afflicted, and felt quite secure in his 
strongly fortified and seemingly im- 
pregnable position, till a "stronger 
than he" came, when with one well 
directed charge, from heaven's all- 
conquering artillery, his throne was 
demolished, his fortications were all 
scattered to the "four winds," his 
battle axes and ugly instruments of 
war, all bright and glistening, from 
their frequent and frightful use, were 
buried so deep in the great sea of ob- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



livioii that they never after appeared 
to remind these suffering people of the 
i aging conflict that they had been so 
madly engaged in and from the dread- 
ful consequences of which they had 
been so miraculously, as well as trium- 
phantly, saved. For, far above the din 
and confusion of battle ; far beyond 
the confines of time and earthly con- 
flicts, a mighty voice was heard from 
above, through song. As noble and 
well drilled a body of singers as per- 
haps were ever tuned to sound forth 
the high praises of God in the midst 
of or before the church of the living 
God- was assembled there on that me- 
morable occasion, and a sublime and 
deeply solemn anthem was to be sung, 
the effect of which was to be the put- 
ting out of the smoldering embers and 
the burying of all the battle axes and 
implements of war over this heaven 
favored people. The thundering tones 
of that majesfic and awfully solemn 
anthem, mellowed by the heavenly 
music of that memorable band of sing- 
ers, of that well drilled choir, whose 
equal, at that day, could not be found 
between there and the city of New 
York, fell with such telling and sooth- 
ing effect upon the ears of that noble 
band of brethren, tliat in fifteen min- 
utes from the time the first thrilling 
notes of that solemn anthem fell in 
such heavenly strains upon that ex- 
cited people, Avar became to them ex- 
ceedingly hateful, and they now found 
themselves assembled in the courts of 
the Lord, with joy and gladness filling 
every, hitherto aching heart. 

"Hear 0 Heavens, and give ear 0 
earth, for the Lord hath spoken. I 
have nourished and brought up child- 
ren and they have rebelled against me. 
The ox knoweth his owner and fhe 
ass his master's crib; but Israel doth 
not know. My people doth not con- 
sider." 

These very impressive and very sol- 
emn words from Isaiah, with their con- 



nection, were the wonderfully solemn 
words of denunciation that were sent 
down from on high, and through the 
instrumentality of song, fell upon that 
listening, restive, and at first, terribly 
excited congregation of brethren and 
interested friends with soothing and 
telling effect. That noble band of 
singers, with their deeply interested 
leader, my own dear father, have ali 
passed away, and the sleeping dust of 
some of them, if not all, lies in undis- 
turbed repose in the adjacent ceme- 
tery, while the memory of that not- 
able day still finds an anxious lodge 
ment in the hearts of some of the 
King's royal family who are seen to 
convene there for worship, from time 
to time, within a few feet of where 
their fathers and mothers worshipped 
ninety-five years ago. 

Among that great congregation of 
the dead lies the slumbering dust of 
seven faithful soldiers of the cross, viz, 
Elders Benjamin Montange, Ames 
Harding. Daniel L. Harding, Gabriel 
( onklin, Gilbert Beebe, Benton Jen- 
kins and William L. Beebe. 

Very truly, sincerely and affection- 
ately, youi - loving brother, 

GEORGE D. CONKLIN. 



P]ASTERN UNION. 

The Eastern Union is to be held 
with the church at Pungo, and to 
commence on Friday before the 5th 
Sunday in May. 

All lovers of truth are invited to 
attend, especially ministers. We have 
but one ordained minister. 

•A. W. AMBROSE, 

Union Clerk. 



ENTERTAINING BOOK 

I have made an arrangement for a 
very niee Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. GOLD, 



22* 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



"Remove not the ancient Landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



P. D. GOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



VOL. XLVIH. NUMBER 10 

Entered at the postoffice at Wilson as 
second class matter. 

WILSON, N. C, APRIL 1, 1915. 



EDITORIAL 

JOB. 

"How hast thou helped him that is 
without power? how savest thou the 
arm that hath no strength? How hast 
thou counseled him that hath no wis 
dom? and how hast thou plentifully 
declared the thing as it is?" Job 26:- 
2-3. 

These are questions whose import 
vitally concerns those that can do 
nothing? But some deny that there are 
no people but what can do something. 
Those three men disputing witli Job 
were insisting that Job could do some- 
thing. They were censuring him con- 
tinually as one that had brought all 
this downfall on himself; but that if 
now he would repent, confess his 
wrong, make reparation, and pray to 
the Lord that God would hear him. 
Yet the fact was that Job had not done 
anything to cause his downfall, nor 
could he do anything to change the 
purpose of God. 

So Job raised the most important 
question for those that see they can- 
not deliver themeslves, nor help, nor 



save themselves. Yet who 'so much 
needs this help as those that cannot 
do any thing to help themselves? How 
hast thou helped him that is without 
power? If a man has no power what 
can he do / / But the Arminians or 
self righteous do not admit that any 
man is in this state or condition. They 
say there is something man can do. 
But if he is without any power what 
can he do? How savest thou* the arm 
that has no strength? If a man's arm 
has no strength what can he do? 

How hast thou counseled him that 
hath no wisdom? If one has no wis- 
dom how can he be counseled, or in- 
structed? And how hast thou plenti- 
fully declared the thing as it is? Have 
you set forth that doctrine that plenti- 
fully, that fully sets forth the truth 
as it is? Have you set forth strength, 
power, knowledge and wisdom that 
supplies every thing, complete fulness, 
so that there is no lack? 

When we were without strength in 
due time Christ died for the ungodly. 
Here is a friend indeed in time of need. 
He is all in all. Jesus is the arm or 
strength of the Lord revealed whose 
salvation is all the more glorious : as it 
all comes from him. Hence all the 
glory is his. 

Now who is it that plentifully or 
fully declares all this doctrine? Who 
is it that preaches a finished and per- 
fect salvation to the lost, or to those 
that are without any help, power, wis- 
dom or ability, but just have to wait 
on God for all things, and who are in 
such desperate straits that they know 
not what to do, nor where to go, and 
are ni such impotency that they are 
desperate. They cannot tell when' 
. nor how to order their cause, 
nor what his purpose is. 

When the matter is plentifully de- 
clared, or when Jesus crucified, risen 
and glorified is preached the perfect, 
unfailing, everlasting remedy is 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



22? 



preached that never leaves out a sin- 
gle one, never loses one, but fully sat- 
isfies every hungry soul, and God is 
gloritied, and •when the poor, needy, 
lost, undone, guilty, helpless soul sees 
and tastes this he is forever satisfied 
with this salvation, nor can he ever de- 
sire any other name. 

There is but one way of salvation 
which is perfect, and leaves out noth- 
ing that should be known. It bears 
the mark and superscription of the 
Lord Jesus. None can be more great- 
ly blest. His last days are his best 
days. This is the Lord's doing, and it 
is marvelous in our eyes. Great and 
marvelous are thy ways, Lord God Al- 
mighty, and just and true are thy ways 
thou King of saints. 

One must come or be brought into 
such straits of need and helpless suf- 
fering that he knows that God only 
can save him, and he. must know that 
it is all of the Lord. 

The way of life is above to" the wise, 
that he may depart from hell be- 
neath. This is the way no vulture's 
eye hath ever seen, nor lion's whelp 
has ever trod. One must be brought 
into that state that man knows he is a 
failure, and none but the Lord alone 
can save in that day. 

P. D. G. 



JOB. 

I am a brother to dragons, and a 
companion to owls. Job 30:29. 

Job is cast off and abhors himself, 
and hath no companion even among 
the ordinary beasts of the field. Such 
as once he would have scorned to set 
with the dogs of his flock now disdain- 
ed -him and held him in derision. He 
had no companionship with any per- 
son. As a leper was he banished from 
society. 

He had become the song, the sport, 
of the drunkards. Driven from men, 
bereft of all his property, with none 



to speak a kind word to him, but all 
accusing him there was no place to 
rest his head. Dragons were his com- 
panions — his brothers, and owls could 
give him no joyful companionship. 

A soul branded with the guilt of 
all transgression, -with no hiding place, 
no refuge, what could he do, where 
could he go? But he protested his 
innocence in all his downfall. No man 
could convince him. No man could 
explain his own case to him, nor could 
soothe his complaint which he felt was 
heavier than he could bear. 

These three friends fail to convince 
hi hi in' to answer his complaint. This 
is an outside case, but few have felt 
as Job. Men who lose one source of 
comfort will resort to another, and 
still another, but when all sources of 
relief tail, and man becomes a com- 
panion of dragons where can he go, 
and what can he do for relief? Ordi- 
narily there is some resting place, but 
Job has none. His soul is weary of 
life. He desires death. The grave ap- 
pears as a covert from the storm, as a 
shelter, and there the weary rest. 

Stung with foul accusations against 
God, where may he go, what a stranger 
is lie .' To vindicate his own course, 
and seek relief in good behaviour does 
not reach his case. 

There appears another character as 
speaker in this conflict. His name is 
Elihu. He does not offer the exper- 
ienee of old age, or of much observa- 
tion as a fund of knowledge able to 
adjust all conflicts, and furnish an an- 
tidote for this grievance. He does not 
propbse to decide Job's case with 
haste. He has patiently listened to 
all their complaints. He said that age 
should speak first. He is not urging 
special knowledge, nor demanding 
that they should hear him. But after 
hearing all the accusations and de- 
fences these three men still condemn 
Job, hut he does not see how they just- 
ly condemn him, yet fail to answer his 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



speech. 

Elihu says he shall not be partial, 
but will hear Job, but he intimates 
that Job has protested his innocence 
in a degree that calls in question God's 
dealings with man, feeling that thert- 
is no room nor grounds left for sup- 
posing that the Lord can do wrong. 
Job's defense seems to justify himself 
and not God; while his accusers con- 
demn Job, yet fail - to establish his 
guilt. But with the Almighty there is 
mercy and cause for hope. Elihu con- 
siders the whole matter, and reminds 
Job that in God's method and order 
there is hope for the oppressed and re- 
lief, for God doth not willingly attliet. 
Peradventure there is an interpreter 
to show man God's mercy, and relieve 
man then God is gracious unto him : 
for there is relief always with God to 
whom nothing is impossible. He look- 
eth upon man, and if any say I have 
sinned and perverted that which is 
right, and it profiteth me not, He will 
deliver his soul from going down into 
the pit, and his life shall see the light. 
Lo all these things God worketh often- 
times with man to bring back his soul 
from the pit, to be enlightened with 
the light of the living. 

As preacher he appears considering 
the case justifying God, and exhorting 
and encouraging Job that there is hope 
in the dealings of the Almighty. 
Though the power of rebuke may hang 
on the thundering brow of the storm — i 
yet the rain of healing shall 
fall in showers of plenty, and God's 
way shall be justifying to man. 

"The ear trieth words as the mouth 
taste th meat.'' The words of the 
Lord are good and if we have health 
in our soul his words are food to the 
soul, and we live by the word of the 
Lord. The sending forth of his right- 
eousness brings healing to the heart, 
and revives the spirit of him that is 
chastened. 

Man cannot resist the Almighty. 



if God set his heart upon man, if he 
gather unto himself his spirit and his 
breath, all flesh shall perish together, 
and man shall turn again to dust. God 
regardeth not the rich any more than 
the poor, for they are all the work of 
his hand. He will not lay upon man 
more than right that he will be able to 
enter into judgment with God. 

Behold Cod is mighty and he de- 
spisetb not any. 

God causes the hidden forces of the 
elements to serve his purpose whether 
for correction, or for his land, or for 
mercy. The balancing of his clouds 
who can understand ' "What wonders 
does the Almighty work, showing man 
his own vanity and God's power and 
wisdom. Yet how great are his mer- 
cies. 

The last speaker of men appears 
before Job with correcting, reproving 
speech, with drops of mercy inter- 
spersed. Does this betoken a better 
day for Job ? When Elihu calls for the 
solemn witness of the universe show- 
ing God's greatness how does this 
leave Job ? 

P. D. G. 



WHAT DO THE DEAD KNOW ? 

Our observation about the dead lit- 
erally is that they see not, hear not, 
taste not, smell not, feel not. Their 
senses of communication with the 
world and to the world are dead. 
Hence in that sense they know not any 
thing but are dead to all they were 
once alive to. There is no power of 
life in any form in them. They know 
not any thing. 

There are different kinds of death. 

Adam died in the day he sinned. 
Died to what? The life he before en- 
joyed. He was separated from that 
life — was driven out from that state 
or condition. A flaming sword so 
guarded the tree of life that he could 
never eat of it. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



22) 



When one is dead hi trespasses 
and sins he is fully under the domin- 
ion of sin and death. He knows not 
what holiness is. He knows nothing 
of holiness. He does not desire it, is 
not submissive to it. Sin reigns unto 
death so he is the servant of sin. 

By the law is the knowledge of sin. 
Paul said he was alive without the 
law. Then he considered that he was 
righteous. But when the command- 
ment came sin revived and he died. 
That which he thought was unto life 
he found to be unto death. 

But when one is dead to the law 
by the body of Christ he knows the 
Lord Jesus whom to know is eternal 
life through Jesus Christ our Lord. 

Solomon said the dead know not 
any thing. That which is dead has 
no life, no knowledge of that to which 
it is dead. Solomon also wrote that 
there is no knowledge in death. "Then 
shall the dust return to the earth 
as it was.*' that is as it 
was before the Lord God 
formed man of the dust of the ground. 
"And the spirit shall return unto God 
who gave it." Now that which re- 
turns to the dust is dead, and knows 
not anything, for there is no life in it. 
When Abraham buried Sarah out of 
his sight it was because of this death. 

But the spirit does not go to the 
grave — it is not dead as the body is 
dead. When they were stoniug Steph- 
en he prayed, Lord Jesus receive my 
spirit. Devout men took the body of 
Stephen and with great lamentation 
they buried that body. AVhen Peter 
spoke on the day of Pentecost he show- 
ed that Jesus saw no corruption while 
he was in the grave, but that David 
fell on sleep and saw corruption, and 
that his sepulcher was iu the earth at 
the time Peter spoke. 

The dead remain in death until the 
resurrection at the last day. and know 
nothing until the resurrection of the 
dead at the last day, when there shall 



be a resurrection both of the just and 
the unjust. 

The writer to the Hebrews says, 
"Ye are not come to the mount thai 
burned &c, but ye are come 10 Mount 
Zion, and unto the city of the living 
God, the heavenly Jerusalem fj *- * and 
to the spirits of just men made per- 
fect, Heb. 12:22-24. 

Now do the spirits of just men ^nade 
perfect know or are they concerned 
about the sorrows of a sinful world. 
They do not. Blessed are the dead 
that die in the Lord. They rest from 
their labors, and their works do fol- 
low. Blessed and holy is he that hath 
part iu the first resurrection wine 
is the resurrection of Jesus Christ. 
From time to time God hath spoken 
unto the fathers by the prophets: but 
in these last days he hath spoken unto 
us by his Son who is appointed heir of 
all things. He sends his angels tha; 
speak to men at times. But the sure 
word of prophecy is the scriptures of 
truth, and the Holy ('host that guides 
into all truth. These things also are 
confirmed unto us by them that heard 
him (the apostles who were eye wit- 
nesses) also the living ministry of the 
word. 

Paul said, ye shall see my face no 
more. Their greatest sorrowing was 
that they should see his face no more 
Acts 20*38. That is when we fall in 
death the places that once knew us 
sh "11 know us no more. 

Ahel being dead yet speaketh. So 
the prophets yet speak in the sense, 
that their words are not dead. But 
they see us no more, and Ave hear 
them no more only as they may appear 
in vision. As the cry from Macedonia 
was heard by Paul. 

God speaks in visions to his ser- 
vants at times, or God teaches them in 
slumbers of the night. God shows as 
it pleases him visions of his servants 
that have pasesd away. One appeared 
to John on the isle of Patmos. and 



230 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



John fell down to worship him but he 
said to John see thou do it not, for i 
am thy fellow servant and of thy 
brethren the prophets, worship God. 

God sends by whom he will to com- 
mand men. 

The guilty fears of men are arrayed 
as enmity against God, but the fear 
that comes from the Lord causes men 
to depart from evil. God is a consum- 
ing fire burning up chaff, and those 
that fear him vail their faces. No 
man can see his face and live ; yet God 
is not the God of the dead, but of the 
living. Men live unto him when they 
rejoice in his word, and his glory 
shines in them, and they serve him, and 
receive strength of him for endurance. 
They are not dead in sin, but dead to 
sin, and alive unto God through Jesus 
Christ our Lord. They know the Lord 
and serve him, while those dead in 
sins know not the love, or joy, or de- 
light of the Lord. To a living man in 
Jerusalem a day in the Lord's courts 
is better than a thousand elsewher e 

God shall raise the God. The dead 
in Christ shall rise first, and those then 
living shall be changed in a moment ; 
for He shall change our vile bodies and 
fashion them like unto the glorious 
body of the Lord Jesus. 

This is a great mystery. It is such 
a display of glorious power. It is a 
wonder to form man of the dust of the 
ground, and breathe into his nostrils 
the breath of life so that man became 
a living soul. How much more won- 
derful when he shall change these vile 
bodies, and fashion them like unto the 
glorious body of the Lord Jesus, so 
that they shall be a suitable habitation 
for the spirits of just men made per- 
fect, where there will be no more sin, 
nor sorrow, nor death, but eternal life 
and unfading glory, and everlasting 
joy, and where they shall knoAv as 
they are known, and ever be with the 
Lord. 

Well may John say, it doth not yet 



appear what we shall be, but we know 
that when He shall appear we shall be 
like him, for we shall see him as he is. 

P. D. G. 



WAY OF LIFE. 

The way of life is above to the wise, 
that he may depart from hell be- 
neath," Prov. 15:24. 

The way of life is not the natural 
way of mankind. There is a way that 
seemeth right unto a man, but the end 
thereof are the ways of death. The 
road or way, the life or manner of liv- 
ing of a natural man is what his nat- 
ural heart loves, and is pleased with. 
It seems right to him because it suits 
him. But the end thereof are the ways 
of death. We should consider the end 
or termination of a thing. How does 
it end? What is the result? What is 
the fruit of it? Solomon says, the end 
of a thing is better than the beginning 
thereof. Look to results. He that con- 
siders before he builds is able to build 
and digs deep, and lays his foundation 
firmly, makes a good beginning and 
he does this because he desires a good 
ending. 

The way of life, or the living way 
goes upward, ascends, rises above the 
world. It is above, higher, purer, bet- 
ter than things of earth. Heaven is 
above in the sense that it is better, 
greater, higher, pure, saving, enobling. 
Set your affection on things above, not 
on things on earth, for ye are dead, 
and your life is hid with Christ in God, 
and when Christ who is our life shall 
appear then shall ye also appear with 
him in glory. 

Hell is beneath, a descending grade, 
a down hill road, an easy going road, 
if you love debasing, corrupting things. 
It requires no good resolves, no high 
aims, no self-denials, no climbing, no 
striving to do well, no seeking better 
things; it is an aimless life, no high 
pursuit, no laying hold on eternal life, 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



231 



no laying aside of anger, wrath, mal- 
ice, or evil speaking, in order to be 
sure to go to hell. 

You can choose the worst things, 
and take them along with you, you can 
take the vilest things man can do, and 
there will be room for you there. None 
are excluded from hell. 

But the way of life is above to the 
wise, that he may depart from hell be- 
neath. There is nothing of earth you 
take with you. It is all too filthy to 
be carried, nor can the poor, vile sin- 
ner take himself. Self must be denied, 
left behind. If any man be in Christ 
he is a new creature". Departing from 
hell beneath, and laying aside every 
weight, and the sin that doth so eas- 
ily beset, and pressing toward those 
things which are before, or striving 
to enter in through the gates into the 
holy city, is the most enobling pursuit 
of the noblest race that ever enlists 
the traveller to eternity. 

P. D. G. 



FAITH. 

BY GRACE ARE YE SAVED 
THROUGH FAITH. 

The law came by Moses; but grace 
and truth came by Jesus Christ. That 
which was first is natural. That which 
makes perfect is spiritual. The law 
made nothing perfect, but the bring- 
ing in of a better hope did. By the 
which we are sanctified by the one of- 
fering of Jesus Christ once for all' — 
for all the body, and forever. 

Is the law sinful.' No, the law is 
holy, just and good, but it is weak 
through the fiesh. By the law is the 
knowledge of sin. It is not in the 
nature or power of the law to put 
away sin, nor to forgive it. 

When it is not in the nature nor 
the power of the law to atone for sin, 
nor put it away, nor make a new crea- 
ture, but can only curse every one 



that continueth not in all things to do 
them, it becomes a yoke that neither 
we nor our fathers could bear. 

The scriptures, foreseeing that God 
would justify the heathen through 
faith, preached the gospel before unto 
Abraham, saying in thee shall all na- 
tions be blessed. For the laAv is not of 
faith. There is nothing in the law 
that can produce faith or hope. 

The Law and the Prophets were un- 
til John. Since then the kingdom of 
heaven is preached, and every man 
presseth into it. He becomes less and 
less, hence he decreaseth and thus 
presseth into it. 

The law worketh wrath. It cannot 
put away sin. But prophecy foretells 
the better day of the gospel, or the 
new dispensation of grace. It fore- 
tells of the fruitfulness of the king - 
dom of heaven, when God should send 
his Son full of grace and truth, when 
righteousness would drop down from 
heaven, and truth would spring up 
from the earth, and the earth would 
yield her increase, when the fruit of 
the Spirit would be love, joy and peace 
in the Holy Ghost. 

There is no faith in, nor of the law. 
Faith is connected with salvation or 
deliverance from sin and death. Faith 
works by love. What wonderful 
fruits, what blessed companions are 
dwellers together in love in the gos- 
pel. It is a new covenant, a new heav- 
en and a new earth, a new ruler, a 
new kingdom. The Lord is our law 
giver, our judge, our king, who will 
save us. He makes all things new. He 
brings all things good with him. He 
removes that which makes nothing 
perfect. He establishes the law by 
fulfilling it. He puts the truth in our 
inward parts. He takes away the 
stony heart, and gives a heart of flesh. 
The covenant of works written upon 
tables of stone broken by man is writ- 
ten in the heart of Christ Jesus, the 



2 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



new covenant keeper and fulfiller. He 
comes from heaven to do the will of 
God in earth, and takes away the 
curse, for he himself is made a curse 
for his people. He is made of a wom- 
an, made under the law, to redeem 
them that were under the law, ti&t 
they might receive the adoption of 
sons, and because they are sons he 
sends forth the Spirit of his Sod i> to 
our hearts crying Abba, Father. 
Wherefore they are no longer servants, 
but sons of God, and if sons than heirs 
of God and joint heirs with Jesus 
Christ, and of his fulness have all we 
received, and grace for grace. 

What holy ground is this. We pat 
Off oar shoes from our feet, and our 
Avalk is by faith. The just shall live 
by faith. By grace are ye saved 
through faith, and that not of your- 
self: it is the gift of God: not of 
works lest any man should boast: for 
we are his workmanship, created in 
Christ Jesus unto good works, which 
God hath before ordained that we 
should walk in them. 

Jesus fulfills the law, he offers him- 
self without spot to God, he is holy, 
he makes an end of sin, he abolishes 
death, he brings in everlasting right- 
eousness, he who knew no sin is made 
sin for us, that Ave might be made the 
righteousness of God in him. For of 
God are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God 
is made unto us wisdom, righteousness, 
sanetifi cation and redemption. That 
if any man should glory let him glory 
in the Lord. 

So -Jesus Christ is the wonderful per- 
former in the gospel. By Jesus all that 
believe are justified from all things 
from which Ave could not be justified 
by the laAv of Moses. Looking unto 
Jesus the author and finisher of our 
faith. This faith is precious, holy, and 
those that believe it are holy and 
blessed. What manner of persons 
ought we to be in all holy conversa- 



tion. Acknowledging Jesus as our 
Head and Hope, our Lord and our God, 
naming no name but his, ascribing per- 
fection to him, growing up into him in 
all things Avho is the head of all prin- 
cipality and poAver, and above every 
name that is named. To whom coming 
as unto a living stone, disallowed in- 
deed of men, but chosen of God and 
precious, ye also as living stones are 
built up a spiritual house, an holy 
priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacri- 
fices, acceptable to God by ' Jesus 
Christ? Unto you therefore which be- 
lieve he is precious. Growing up into 
Christ in all things, when Ave aAvake 
with his likeness Ave shall be satisfied. 

This faith is the substance of tilings 
hoped for, the evidence of things not 
seen, a foundation whose builder and 
maker is God, a city built without 
hands eternal in the heavens. 

P. D. G. 

„LOWER COUNTRY LINE ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

At Mt. Zion church, a section meet- 
ing of the Lower Country Line Asso- 
ciation will be held Saturday and 2nd 
Sunday in April, if the Lord wilL 

Visitors will be met at Virgilina, on 
Saturday morning, at 9-10, both Avays. 
Those coming write to T. M. Chand- 
ler, Virgilina, Va., R. 3. 

T. M. CHANDLER. 

ELDERS T. N. WALTON AND W. 
JAMISON. 

North Fork— Tuesday after the 4th 
Sunday in April. 

Camp Branch — Wednesday. 
R epub lica n — Thursday. 
Union — Friday. 
Knob— May 1st (Saturday.) 
Senter — Sunday. 
Martinsville— Wendesday night. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



ELDER J. P. FARMER. 

Benson — -Thursday night April 29. 

Dunn — Friday 10 a. m. 
Coats — Friday night. 
Angier— Sat. and Sunday, May 1 and 
2. 

Oak Grove— Tuesday. 
Willow Springs — "Wednesday. 

ELDER T. N. WALTON. 

Fairfield — Monday alter 1st Sunday 
in April. 

Chapel — Tuesday. 

Ephesus — Wednesday. 

Union — Friday. 

Weatherford — 1st Sunday. 

Springfieldf— Monday. 

Brother Thomas Hodnetts' — Tues- 
day, e 

Mountain Springs— Wednesday. 



ELDER J. E. ADAMS. 

Bethany— Sat. and 4th Sunday in 
April. 

Goldsboro— Monday night. 
LaGrange — Tuesday. 
Kinston — Tuesday night and Wed- 
nesday. 

Newport — Sat. and 1st Sunday in 
May. 

Morehead City — Monday. 
Marshallburg — Tuesday and .\t 
night. 

Davis Shore' — Thursday and at 
night. 

Nelsons Bay — Friday evening at 4 
p. m. 

Hunting Quarter — Sat. and 2nd 
Sunday. 

Hog Island and Cedar Island week 
after and Sat. and 3rd Sunday at 
Cedar Island. 

Jones Bay — Tuesday night. 

Goose Creek — Wednesday. 

Beaulah — Thursday. 

Rose Bay — Friday. 

Tiny Oak— Sat. and 4th Sunday. 



North Lake — Monday. 

East Lake — Tuesday night and 
Wednesday. 

Kitty Hawk Banks — Sat. and 5tk 
Sunday. 

Powells Point — Monday and at 
night. 

Elizabeth City — Tuesday night and 
^Vednesday. 

Flatty Creek — Saturday and lat 
Sunday in June. 

Bethlehem — Saturday and 2nd Sun- 
day in J ime. 

Concord — Monday and Tuesday. 



UNION NOTICE. 

The next session of the Staunton 
River Union will meet with the church 
at Wethorford, commencing on Friday 
before the 5th Sunday in May, includ- 
ing Saturday and 5th Sunday. 

Wetherford is 2 1-2 miles west of 
Sycamore, on Southern Railroad. 

Brethren are invited. 

Done bv order of the church. 

N. T. OAKS, Mod. 
A. C. OWEN, Clerk. 



BEAR CREEK ASSOCIATION. 

The spring session of the Bear Creek 
Primitive Baptist Association will con- 
vene with the church in the suburbs 
of the city of Albemarle, N. C, com- 
mencing on Saturday before first Sun- 
day in May, 1915. 

A cordial invitation to Baptists to 
attend. 

The Southern trains pass Albemarle 
from Salisbury and other points north 
at six p. m. daily. The Winston-Salem 
southbound passes Albemarle from 
Winston at 7 :30 p. m. daily, and from 
Wadesboro and other Southern points. 
The southbound train will pass Albe- 
marle at S :30 a. m. 

Brother W. H. Hinson, the church 
clerk of Albemarle, N. O, R. 1, informs 
me that all these trains will be met 



L'-'M 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



and all who come will be cared for. 

This is done by the request of the 
Association. 

J. W. JONES, 
Associational Clerk. 

Marsh ville, N. C. 



^ituaries. 



L. D. JOHNSON. 

Through much weakness I will en- 
deavor to write a sketch of the life and 
death of our beloved brother, L. D. 
Johnson, who departed this life Dec. 
27, 1914. lie was born April b, 1853, 
being the son of Allen and Elizabeth 
-Johnson of the southern part of John- 
son county. 

Jan. 14, 1875 he was married to Mar- 
guerite, daughter of Jas. H. Johnson, 
to which union were born ten children, 
nine of whom survive him. The be- 
reaved companion of the deceased is 
an invalid, being confined to her bed 
of affliction for eleven years and for 
the last nine years not being able to 
rise up in bed. 

What a living example of sweet pa- 
tience her life is to those who enter 
her presence. Words fail to express 
her gentle christian spirit, and we sym- 
pathize with her deeply in her lonely 
hours of confinement at the loss of her 
dear companion who was indeed a 
good and faithful husband in all things 
to her. 

Brother Johnson united with the 
church at Barbary's Chapel where he 
remained until this church was dis- 
continued. In 1902 he moved his mem- 
bership to Reedy Prong where shortly 
afterwards he was appointed deacon, 
which duty he performed faithfully 
and well. 

The deceased was a cousin of the 



writer, having lived near him from 
earliest recollection and he Avas very 
dear to me. 'Having lost my own 
earthly father, I could go to the de- 
ceased for help and advice of which 
he always willingly gave, indeed he 
was a i ways willing to bear the burden 
of others' 

Brother Johnson Avas enjoying or- 
dinary health until the 2nd Sunday in 
Dee. He met with the church at Hick- 
ory Grove the day before and return- 
ed home that night as well as usual. 
Early Sunday morning he was sudden- 
ly seized with terrible, excruciating 
pains of the urinary organs. A phy- 
sician, who was immediately sum- 
moned, could do him no good, so that 
night he was carried to a Payetteville 
hospital, accompanied by his physic- 
ian, where he continued to suffer until 
Dec. 26, when an operation was per- 
formed. He died twenty-four hours 
afterwards, Dec. 27, in the most fright- 
ful agonies. 

The next day his body was brought 
home, and the scene was most heart- 
rending, as his corpse was brought in- 
to the presence of his poor wife, 
whose condition required all medical 
aid for her to survive this critical mo- 
ment. 

We cannot help but mourn our loss 
but we mourn not as those "W ithout 
hope; he has only answered his Sav 
iour's call, come home! 

As a citizen he had the confidence of 
all who knew him. The church has 
lost a father in Israel whose place the 
Lord only can fill, but on his dear com- 
panion has fallen the greatest loss. 
Bear it patiently, dear sister, I feel 
sure the parting will not be long and 
joyous will be the meeting on that 
bright and shining shore. 

To his children T will say, your loss 
is great, but remember his wise coun- 
cil. Remember him in obedience as 
though he still lived to give you ad 
vice. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



235 



The day his body arrived home, by 
request of his wife, Elders L. A. John- 
sou and Xure Lee spoke for the con- 
solation of his friends and loved ones, 
a ud ou account of disagreeable 
weather services were discontinued 
uutil the following morning when Lid. 
\V. M Monsees spoke for the comfort 
of relatives and friends after which 
his body was taken to Lee cemetery 
and there consigued to the- cold and 
m1 nit tomb to await the resurrection 
morn, when Gad will call his sleeping 
dust into life, like unto His own glor- 
ious body to sing the praises of God 
ever more. 

Humbly submitted, 

AZUBAH LEE. 

Dunn, N. C, R, 2. 



TAD1THA JANE MINTER. 

Death, the monster sickle sent by 
Jehovah's hand, has again visited tlie 
eouimunity and claimed its own in the 
person of our precious sister, Tabitha 
Jane Minter, who was bom unto Cole- 
man Allen and Fannie Deshazo, his 
wife, Sept. 4, 1834 and was married 
to Obediah Eward Minter, Nov. 27, 
1831, the result of this union being five 
living children, some having died in 
infancy. The names of the living are 
O. C. Minter, Axton, Va., W. M. Min- 
ter, Pocahontas, Va., Mrs. V. J. Slay- 
don, Leaksville, X. G, J. L. Minter, 
Sandy River, Va., and Mrs. F. A. De- 
\ in. Roanoke, Va. 

She had twenty-seven grand children 
and thirty-two great-grand children. 

Being an orphan, her mother dying 
when she was small, her life's struggle 
was a hard one, but she fought the bat- 
tle in a faithful and honest way and 
was highly esteemed by all who knew 
her. 

Many were her trials and afflictions 
in life, her husband dying and leav- 
ing her a widow for nearly forty 
years, but the Lord was her husband, 



giving her evidences of a good hope of 
rest, peace and happiness in the world 
to come, which hope she professed and 
acknowledged in July 1883- at North- 
fork church, being baptized the Aug- 
ust following by Elder J. N. Bell. She 
lived in sweet fellowship with this 
church for about ten years when for 
convenience she moved her member- 
ship to Axton church where she re- 
mained a faithful member until her 
death. 

She was a devoted sister to all mem- 
bers, especially to her pastor, always 
speaking a comforting word to those 
in trouble and helping those in need. 

she was noted for her hospitality at 
home. The principle of selfishness 
and covetousness had no room in her 
person. She was strong in the faith 
of salvation by grace and she proved 
her faith by her works. Although be- 
ing of delicate health she was always 
roads and willing to attend to the 
needs of those in distress, not confin- 
ing her assistance solely to her kind- 
red and friends, but to all who needed 
help, even to the lowest and meanest, 
often administering to them with her 
own hands. 

The unworthy writer was reminded 
of this while standing by her coffin 
and looking at those hands which were 
folded in death. Never more will they 
soothe the fevered brow, but the ef- 
fect of those tender caresses will be 
felt for generations to come. 

She was not boastful, but said she 
felt unworthy of the hope she claimed. 

Her son Billie and daughter Fan- 
nie came from Roanoke to see her the 
d;;y before she died and she recog- 
nized them perfectly and was fully 
conscious of everything up to the time 
of her death, and was heard to repeat 
hymns of praise. Her son Leftwick 
asked her if she wished to praise the 
Lord. She answered yes, "I'll praise 
Him while He gives me breath, and 
I hope to praise Him after death," and 



^. ZION'S LANDMARK. 



236 

passed ava\ shortly afterwai-ds as one 
going to sleep. 

She died Dec. 21, 191-4, making her 
stay here 80 years, 3 months and 17 
days. Services were conducted by 
Eldor A. L. Moore, her pastor and Eld. 
J. J. Beck, in the presence of a large 
congregation of sorrowing relatives 
and friends and her remains buried 
near the house of her homestead where 
she had lived and died. 

Now may the God of all grace be 
with the bereaved and may her child- 
ren follow in the footsteps of their 
mother and when they have filled up 
the measure of their days on earth let 
it be said of them as it was of her, 
"•well done thou good and faithful 
servant. " is the prayer of one who 
loved her. 

In a short way the above describes 
the life of a devoted wife, a loving 
mother, a kind and obliging neighbor. 

"Blessed are the dead which die in 
the Lord from henceforth. Yea. saith 
the Spirit, that they may rest from 
their labors, and their works do fol- 
low them." 

J. J. BECK. 



MRS. S ALL IE A. MASSEY: 

The subject of this sketch was born 
Dec. 3. 1S44 and died Jan. 30, 1915, 
making her stay on earth 70 years, 1 
month and 27 days. Jn April. 18*68, 
she married Mr. B. G. Massey. who 
preceded her to the grave by about 
thirty years, to which union was born 
one child. Lucy A. Oliver, wife of Bro. 
R. Y. Oliver of Bethany church, John- 
ston County. N. C. They made their 
home with her and their children 
loved her a* a mother for truly she 
was a good one to them indeed. 

She" was much esteemed and loved 
in her community for she took great 
delight in favoring her neighbors, vis- 
iting and nursing the sick and in liv- 
ing a faithful and useful life. 



1 have known her for years and a 
more humble, meek and lamb-like char- 
acter I never knew. 

She never united with ilie church, 
but was a lirm believer in the Primi- 
tive Baptist doctrine and loved the 
church but said she was not worthy to 
live with them. While she never 
united 1 have held her in sweet fellow- 
ship since I have known her. 

She was -in feeble health with heart 
trouble for two years prior to her 
death and was cared for with all the 
love and tenderness her daughter, son- 
in-law and graud-children could show 
her. 

She died suddenly which of course 
was a great shock to them. They will 
sadly miss her. 

She leaves two brothers, A, R. and 
H. J. Thompson together with her 
daughter, son-in-law and grand-chil- 
dren who feel a vacancy in theix home 
that never can be filled. By request I 
served on the occasion of her funeral 
at her old home before the buriaL 

Written bv request of her daughter. 

J. T. COLLLER. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas it has pleased the Lord to 
remove from our midst Sister Rosalie 
F. Yancey, wife of brother James E. 
Yancey, we feel it our duty that the 
church at Flat River, Person County, 
request our clerk to write these reso- 
lutions and send same to Zion's Land- 
mark for publication. 

Sister Yancey has been a faithful 
member of this church for thirty-seven 
years and seven months, having united 
Saturday before the 4th Sunday in- 
Julv. 1877, departing this life Feb. 
10, 1915. 

Therefore, be it resolved, that we 
assure the family and friends of Sis- 
ter Yancey of our heartfelt sympathy 
in the loss of a faith fnl and devoted 
member, and that we kumkly kepe 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



23, 



Cod will keep us in the knowledge of 
His kingdom and save us all in heaven, 
then we shall he like Him. Then we 
can say we know our Redeemer liveth. 

Done by order of the church in Con- 
ference at our February meeting, 1915. 

ELDER J. J. HALL, Mod. 
W. R. BLALOCK, Church Clerk. 



JESSE T. BRAS WELL. 

As 1 have not seen anything in the 
Landmark concerning Brother Jesse 
T. Braswell, 1 thought 1 would write 
a few words in memory of him. 
1 have never called him anything but 
brother, as my mother did. 1 can't 
help but miss him, as he liked so much 
to hear me sing, and when I went to 
see him he would be sure to ask me to 
sing his songs, which were many. 

1 miss him so much on first Sunday 
mornings coming and calling mother 
to go witii him and Sister Hraswell to 

ehurch. 

I have often heard mother say that 
he Mas so kind and faithful to' the vis- 
iting preachers, and not only them, 
bul every other Baptist. 

It looks sad to me when 1 go to 
church with mother and see his seat 
vacant. 

His age is unknown to me. He died 
.Sept. 4, 1914. 

Dear Brother Gold, please publish 
this in the Landmark. 

Written by his little friend. 

PAT TOM GWATNEY, 

Age 13 years. 

RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

The following tribute of respect is 
submitter! for publication to the mem- 
ory of our much beloved deacon of 
Reedy Prong church, L. D. Johnson, 
who departed this life Dec. 27. 1914' 

Therefore be it resolved . 

1st. That in the death of our de?r 
kr»tk«r the chnrek kae •uitaiisd a 



great loss; we loved him so much: he 
was so faithful. While our loss is so 
great his gain is transcendently great- 
er in the happy exchange from the 
militant to that triumphant heavenly 
state of eternal bliss. His devoted 
wife, being an invalid, sustains the loss 
of a husband and companion indeed, 
also to his beloved children who have 
lost their father we extend our deep- 
est sympathy in their bereavement. 

2nd. That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be placed upon our church rec- 
ord, and a copy be sent to the 
family, also that a copy be sent to 
Zion's Landmark for publication. 

Done by order ol the church at 
meeting in February, 1915. 

I. E. SMITH, 

G. P. LEE, 

Committee. 



Cancer Cured at the KeMam Hospital. 

The record of tha Kel am Hospital 
is without parallel In history, having 
cured without '.he tue of the Knife. 
Acids, X-Ray or R;idium, over ninaty 
rer cent, of the many hundreds of 
sufferers from Cancer which It has 
treated during the past eighteen 
years. We want every man and wom- 
an in the United States to know what 
we are doing. KELLAM HOSPITAL, 
1617 W. Main St., Richmond, Va. 
Writ* for literature. 




READ EVERY WORD OF THIS 
REMAiiKAiiLE STORY. 
It is told by one who has himself ex- 
perienced the regeneration in health 
which he encourages you to seek by 
the self-same means. 

THE STORY OF A GREAT DISCOVERY 

The hardships cf a traveling salesman's 
life had wrecked my health. My family 
physician diagnosed my case as chronic 
gastritis, brought on by disease of the liver 
and complicated by kidney trouble. I con- 
sulted specialists who conlirmed his diag- 
nosis. Months passed, I rrew worse and 
was finally compelled to give up my work. 

By chance I heard of some wonderful 
cures which had resulted from drinking the 
water of a little spring in the Mineral Belt 
of South Carolina, a picture of which spring 
appears on this page. In desperation I tried 
it. On the second day I thought that I 
could notice some improvement; at the end 
of the first week my appetite and digestion 
had returned an} I was much stronger; at 
the end of the third week I "felt that I was 
completely cured. That was six years ago 
and I still enjoy perfect health. 

Knowing that it had restored my health 
and believing that it had saved my life, I 
bought the Spring. 

I then determined to see -whether the wa- 
ter would cure others as it had cured me. 
I shipped ten gallons absolutely free of 
charge to each of one thousand sufferers 
from chronic diseases. Only four reported 
no benefit from the use of the ten gallons. 
The other nine hundred and ninety-six re- 
ported decided benefit or complete cures. 
Many claimed th t the water had saved 
their lives. 

I realized that I had discovered one of 
the world"s greatest mineral springs, and I 
decided to devote my life to it. But how 
could I make the world listen; how cpuld 
I make them believe my story? The pre- 
cious water was running to waste while 
thousands were suffering. I said, I will 
make them believe me by showing my faith 
in them and in the curative power of the 
Spring. I will tell them that the water sball 



IF YOU VALUE 




cost them nothing if it fails to benefit. 



The world listened! 

Some wrote for proof and I sent them 
the letters which I had received from their 
fellowmen. Others accepted my offer with- 
out question. Thousands have written me 
reporting relief and permanent cure of a 
great variety of chronic diseases. 

But some of the water still ran to waste 
for lack of belief. I determined that every 
drop should be used to relieve the suffer- 
ings of humanity. To this end I requested 
the advertising manager of the Zion s Land- 
mark to come to se me. At my desk I 
opened my mail and showed him the letters 
from men and women from all parts of the 
country who had suffered and who had 
found relief. I gave him my letter files and 
induced him to spend several hours reading 
my past correspondence with those who 
were using the water. I showed him the 
chemical analysis and letters from physi- 
cians explaining the curative properties of 
the water. 

He believed, and as a result he has writ- 
ten this announcement for me. 

WILL YOU BELIEVE? 

I do not ask your implicit faith: only 
enough to try the water for three weeks as 
I did. I estimate that I drank about ten 
gallons and I, therefore, offer gladly to ship 
you two five gallon demijohns on my guar- 
antee that if you find that it doe* not bene- 



YOUR HEALTH 



fit you I will promptly refund the price, 
which is only $2.00. You must promise to 
drink the water in accordance with the in- 
structions which I will send you and return 
the empty demijohns. I make you the sole 
judge as to whether the water has benefited 
you, and as the Advertising Manager of this 
paper has kindly consented to guarantee my 
guarantee to refund your money, if you are 
not benefited. I hope you will feel perfect- 
ly free to accept my offer. 

This offer is extended to all who suffer 
with any chronic disease, except cancer and 
consumption, but I especially recommend 
the water for the treatment of stomach, 
liver, kidney and bladder diseases and for 
rheumatism, gout, uric acid poisoning, gall 
stones, diabetes, nervous headache and gen- 
eral debility resulting from impure or im- 
poverished blood. There are the diseases 
most frequently mentioned in the letters 
which I have received, but my offer is open 
to anyone who suffers from any chronic 
ailment. Yours sincerely, 

N. F. SHIVAR, Proprietor. 
EVERY MAIL BRINGS LETTERS LIKE 
THESE 
Savannah, Ga., Dec. 28, 1910. 

Mr. N. F. Shivar, Shelton, S. C. Dear Sir. 
As you are well aware, In 1909 I was suffer- 
ing with indigestion, stomach and liver dis- 
orders and all Its train of horrifying pheno- 
mena for several months. I had lived on 
milk, soft eggs, shredded wheat, a very in- 
sufficient diet for an active working man. 
and of course, from disease and starvation 
was In a very low state of nervous vitality 
and general debility. I ordered 10 gallons 
of your Mineral Water, which I used con- 
tinuously, reordering when necessary, and 
in four months from date I began drinking- 
it gained 29 lbs., was strong and perfectly 
well and have worked practically every day 
sin^p. Tt acts as a general renovator of the 



system. 1 prescribe it in my practice, and 
it has in every instance had the desired 
effects. It is essential to use this water in 
as large quantities as possible, for its pro- 
perties are so happily blended and in such 
proportion that they will not disturb the 
most delicate system. It is purely nature's 
remedy. 

A. L. R. AYANT, M. D. 

DuPont, Ga., Nov. 25, 1911. 
Shivar Spring, Shelton, S. C: Gentlemen 
— I have suffered for years with nervous in- 
digestion and kidney troubles. Derived 
more benefit from the Shivar Spring Water 
t hau from months at Hot Springs, Ark., ami 
numerous other Springs. I consider it the 
very best water extant 

AUGUSTUS DUPONT. 

Lexington, Va... Nov. 24, 1911. 
Mr. N. F. Shivar, Shelton, S. C: Dear 
Sir — I suffered with intestinal indigestion 
and the Shivar Spring Water has cured me. 
I would gladly recommend It to all suffering 
with indigestion, kidney and liver trouble. 
My father had kidney trouble last fall and 
lie thought Shivar Spring Water saved his 
life. Respectfully, 

MRS. HARVEY DIXON. 

Atlanta, Ga., July 27, 19H. 
Mr. N. F. Shivar, Shelton, S. C: Dear 
Sir — I ordered 10 gallons Shivar Spring Wa- 
ter especially for my teething baby who was 
suffering with Its stomach and bowels. 
This water cured her disorders entirely and 
she is herself again. I stopped all medi- 
cine and gave her only the water. I ^as 
also run down from the heat and fatif'ie, 
and the water has restored me also. Thank- 
ing you. Very respectfully, 

MRS. W. C. McGILL. 



FILL OUT THIS COUPON AND MAIL IT TODAY 
Shivar SDrinS. Box 55 P. Shelton, S. C. 

Gentlemen :- -I accent vonr guarantee offer and enclose herewith two [$2,001 dollars for ten Sailors |two five gallons 
demijahnal of SHivar Snrin<< Water. I aoree to Jive the water a fair trial in accordance with thr instructions which you will 
aend. and if Iderive no benefit therefrom you are to refund the price in full, upon demand and upon receipt of the two empty 
demijona, which I a<ree to return promptly. 

Xiinf 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



For Emergency Use 

■yery well regulated family should ksep 
on hand a jar of Mentholatuni. 

Its uses are various, because it is an ex- 
cellent antiseptic and germicide and also a 
delicate counter irritant — just the thing 
needed for scalds, burns, bruises, sprains, 
•happed skin, insect bites and stings. 

Mentholatum is a combination of volatile 
aromatic oils with a heavier base. 

In the case of scalds and burns the heavy 
base keeps out the air, a very necessary 
condition. 

The lighter aromatic oils disinfect the 
surfaee and protect it from infection from 
without. 

The lighter oils also set up a delicate 
counter irritation which, seems to draw the 
.'•oreness out of the injured part, reducing 
the inflammation and encouraging rapid 
recovery. 

For this reason it is very much used for 
colds, sore throat, catarrh, and croup. 




RHEUMATISM 

CURED ; TO STAY CURED 

Dear Reader; 1 am an old lady nearly 
SO years old. I suffered many 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Nerves. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

CONNERSVTLLE, IND., 
R. No. 1, Box G., 

Agents Wanted. 



| DROPSY 



TREATED, usually giv. 



FOR INFORMATION. 
For information and for reference 
we would be pleased to have a Minute 
of every Primitive Baptist Association 
in America and will thank the Clerks 
of the various Associations to forward 
one to me at their earliest possible 
convenience. 

Cured His 
Rupture 

Confederate Veteran Used th« 
.Brooks Appliance and Oared 
Himself at Home. 




Taken From a Photograph of Mr. Henry D. 
Banks — R. F. D., No. 11— Commerce, Ga. 

Mr. Banks writes— "I am sound and so well 
that I can plow or do any kind of heavy work. 
I can truly say your Appliance has effected a 
permanent cure. I was in a terrible condi- 
tion and hi.d given up hope of ever beinsr 
any better. If it hadn't been for your Appli- 
ance, I would never have got well. I am 70 
years old and served three years in Eckle's 
Artillery of Oglethorpe Co. I hope God will 
reward you for the good you are doing to 
suffering humanity." 

Brooks' Appliance, the modern scientifte. 
invention, the wonderful discovery that makes 
life worth living, fir ruptured people, will 



Has 



ih on trial. No springs or hard pads, 
utomatic air cushions, Binds and drang 
together as yon wonl l a broken 



the l»rok(-_ 

limb. No salves. No lies. Durable, cheap 
Sent on trial to prove It. Full information and 
book on rupture, mailed free. Write today 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 
AT 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Primitive or Old School Baptist 

VOL. XLV1II. WILSON, N. C, APK1L 15, 1915 NO. 11. 



P. D. GOLD, Editor, Wilson, N. C. 

P. Q. LESTER, Asso. Editor, Floyd, Va. 



$1.50 PER YEAR. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 



"Ask for the old paths where is the food way." 

By the help of the Lord this paper will contend for the 
ancient landmark, guided by its stakes of Troth, and 
strengthened by its eords of lore. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and histitmtions of men, 
and regard only the Bible as the standard ef tenth. 

It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey 
loans, the Sing in the Holy Hill ef Son, keeping them- 
selves unspotted from the world. 

It aims to contend for the mystery of the faith in God, 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, the 
blessed Comforter. 

KtTIOEl 

When a subscriber desires his paper a hanged he should 
state plainly both the old and new poste&ees. Whom one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send whaj fe dan, e*d aSsg 

siaae nm postettee. ( 

Lot each subscriber n*j for his paper in c Cranes if pan. 
sffele, and when ho renews giv« Lite e*u*e name is ha& been 
going is, unless he wishes it changed, then he should t>tats 
both the old and the new names. 

If the money sent has set been receipted, please inform 
me of it. When yon can always send money by money order 
or eheek, or draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Each subscriber can tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agents. 

AH names and post offices should be written plainly. 

All lovers ef jospel truth are invited to write for it — if 
so impressed. 

May grace, moroy and peace be multiplied te all levers 
of truth. 

All oommuittcataens, business letters, remittances of P. ©. 
Orders, money, GPfefts, etc., should be sent to • 



P. D. GOLD, TTSeeu, H. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Cold:— i hope you and 
family are well. 1 have not been well 
since December and for six -weeks I 
never left the house. But 1 am bet- 
ter now though cannot work yet. 

Brother Cold, if I know my heart 
my desire is that the Lord will bless 
you both spiritually and naturally and 
that you may be blest to continue to 
proclaim His gospel. 

1 have been taking the Landmark 
for nearly thirty years and have al- 
ways been glad to read your editorials, 
and sometimes have read and shed 
I tears and have felt to say, what a won- 
derful gift the Lord has blest you with. 

Will you please thiuk of me in your 
prayers. 

Yours in hope, 

J. S. CLAYTON. 
Roxboro, N. C, R. 4. 



AN EXPLANATION. 

Dear Brother Cold: — Some of the 
brethren and sisters think strange of 
the following expressions in the intro- 
duction of my letter to Sister Annie 
W. Cillikin which you republished in 
the Landmark for March 1st, to-wit: 

"My necessities are such that 1 have 
been compelled to spend my spare 
days at work to meet our expenses and 
therefore I have not had an opportun- 
ity to write," &c. 

I want to say to all concerned that 



that letter to Sister Cdlikin was writ- 
ten near or quite twenty-five years ago. 
At that time her husband was light- 
house keeper at Harbor Island and 
they lived on board of the light house. 
Their postoilice was Lupton at that 
time, now it is Beaufort and has been 
for a number of years. Then it was 
necessary for me to do what labor 1 
could towards my support and 1 did it. 
Now the churches I serve and the con- 
gregations outside of the churches very 
kindly care for me, yet I find it both a 
duty and a privilege for me to do all 
the work that my spare time and my 
strength will allow and it is a pleasure 
for me to do it. 

I have carefully read over the said 
article twice and am glad that the 25 
years which have elapsed since I wrote 
it have not brought about any change 
in my faith on a single point in that 
letter. If I could do so I would not 
add a word nor take one from it. I 
feel glad that brother Gold saw fit to 
give it space in his paper, or rather in 
OUR PALER. 1 am sure in my heart 
that it is the truth. 

With love and christian fellowship 
to all my brethren and sisters, I am, 
Your poor servant, 

L. H. HARDY. 
Atlantic, N. C' March 15, 1915. 



COMMUNICATION. 
Dear Brother Gold: — I see in the 



242 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



last Landmark a letter from Sister 
Mary E. Gardner in which she begins 
by saying: "The voice said write. 
Now what shall I write." 

And after reading her letter aud 
your remarks underneath, the same 
voice said to me (by impression in my 
heart if I am not mistaken) to "send 
you the subscription price for one year 
for her." (And as Sister Gardner 
obeyed the voice and received comfort, 
aud as it is a comfort to us to read her 
r letter, even so I am sending you check 
Tor $1,50 in obedience to the impress- 
ion in my heart, and I am sure I could 
not be satisfied not to do so. 

I find that in obedience to our Heav- 
enly Father's commandments, and I 
don't believe He requires impossibili- ' 
ties of His children, Ave find joy and 
not grief. 

In your remarks you say you are 
glad to send the Landmark though she 
says she cannot pay you now. showing 
your willingness to do your part free- 
ly and cheerfully. Thus I feel we 
should lend a helping hand, and with 
you, mutually share the burden, or 
rather it seems to me, blessing, for it- 
is a blessing to have the privilege to 
help our brethren who are in need. 
Yours in hope, 

M. B. WILIFORD. 



A GOOD LETTER. 

Dear Brother Gold: — I am sending 
you a letter from Sister Sue Moore who 
is a dear sister to me, having her per- 
mission to send it to you for the Land- 
mark. I feel that it will be a comfort 
to the household of faith. 

Was blest to attend our quarterly 
meeting Sunday. Brothers Williard 
and Stricklan were with us. Jesus was. 
preached and I felt that he was in the 
midst. 

Dear brother may you live long to 
proclaim His doctrine. 



From one who loves this doctrine for 
Jesus' sake. 

MAGGIE A. STATON. 

My Dear Sister Maggie : — I know 
you will be surprised to hear from me, 
but 1 have thought many times since 
you were in Robersonville that I would 
write you. 

I enjoyed the few times spent with 
you so much, for there is more real joy 
and peace found in conversing with 
God's humble, afflicted children than 
anything in this world. He says, ' ' 1 
will leave in the midst of thee a poor 
and afflicted people and they shall 
trust in the name of the Lord." This 
shows that sorrows and afflictions be- 
long to God's people, to keep them at 
the feet of Jesus and each other, so 
they can trust in the Lord. 

"Though 1 am made in love to bear, 

Afflictions needful rod; 
Light, sweet and kind the strokes ap- 
pear 

Through fellowship with God." 

Sometimes when I get -so low in 
spirit I wonder if I have ever spent 
one moment in fellowship with God. 
Any way I am comforted by the prec- 
ious words of the gospel at times and 
this world and its vanities have no 
charms for me. There are times when 
no! liing of a worldly nature will in- 
spire me at all and the seasons of spir- 
itual enjoyment are so few and far 
between I often think this world is 
onh a dark and thorny desert through 
which we poor pilgrims are led for a 
purpose. Yes, I believe its to bring 
us more into the fellowship with 
Christ's sufferings. None of us have 
ever suffered as He did when nailed 
to the cross, to suffer and die for us, 
and I hope I am one for whom He died. 

When I was a child I dreamed that 
Christ came to the door of our home 
and knocked. Mama started to meet 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



243 



Hhn but I was the one He came to 
seek. So 1 met Him and there I found 
Him standing with bloody hands and 
He had a piece of liesh in his hands 
for me. He said, You shall have every- 
thing you want. When i get into such 
a low destitute state as I have been in 
lately 1 feel that it is only a lack of 
faith to trust in Him, for His prom- 
ises are always sure. Yes, my disob- 
edience often makes me mourn, but 
1 have to be driven to obey any spir- 
itual impression which causes me to 
fear the wrath of God upon me, instead 
of those precious promises given to 
the obedient. How good to be will- 
ing and obedient so that we may taste 
of the goodness of God's mercies. 

This is what causes the state of af- 
fairs to be like they are today, and 
such coldness among our people. 

Israel has sinned, gone back to the 
Ilcsh pots of Egypt, seeking the goods 
of this world and glorying in its vani- 
ties, "lie that glorieth, let him glory 
in the Lord." 

1 took the agency for a perfume com- 
pany, to sell some of its goods, some- 
time ago and 1 soon gave it up. These 
words tame to my mind, "Be content 
with such things as ye have." I knew 
then 1 should not have taken it. 

How I do want to be led in the right 
way and have an eye single to the 
glory of God, but if God does- not lead 
me 1 shall fall by the wayside. "It is 
not of man that walketh to direct his 
steps," and I realize this more each 
day. . 

I had a dream about you sometime 
ago. You and I, as well as several 
others, were going from church some 
where and we were walking, and as 
the sand was very deep, you could 
hardly get along, but were still very 
hopeful. Several were riding but 
none look us to ride. We were in the 
dust and heat, but none to help. But 
(lod helped us to get home, and it 
•««med that I had to feed you just like 



you were a little child. I wonder if 
this means that both of us are very 
low spirited and I must feed you. To 
be sure it can't mean that, for I don't 
see how such a poor worm of the dust 
could afford any comfort for such a 
christian as I believe you are. God is 
able to work through the simple and 
foolish as well as the wise and 1 hope 
this impression to write to you is from 
God. 

Must close with lots of love. 
Your sister in hope, 

SUE MOORE. 

RobersonviHe, N. C. 



EXPERIENCE AND CALL TO THE 
MINISTRY. 

Dear Brother Gold, and all the 
brethren and sisters who may chance 
to read this. After heading this ar- 
ticle 1 looked over it again and my at- 
tention is drawn to the deep meaning 
of the word "experience."' How do 1 
know I have an experience. 1 am 
made at times to doubt I have had an 
experience of grace and I do not claim 
the bright evidences shown by many 
of our brethren and sisters in their 
experiences. However since my poor 
carnal sinfful mind has I hope been 
turned from the vain perishable things 
of this world to the things pertaining 
to the blessed Master's cause I have 
never been willing, to the present 
time, to exchange the blessed hope I 
feel at times to possess for the world 
and all its cares. 

Now lets go back and take up a 
few brief sketches of what I hope has 
been the dealings of the Lord with 
me. Up to about six years ago I loved 
gay company and sought the pleasures 
of this life as much as anyone. I 
thought; I was as good as anyone and 
better than some I knew. But for 
some reason as far back as I can re- 
member I have had at times serious 
thoughts about prayers, again at 



244 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



times 1 would consider them nothing 
but a form of words. Until about six 
years ago i had never made an at- 
tempt to offer prayer in any way. i 
had never had any faith in self works, 
therefore f did not decide at any time 
that if f prayed to God He would save 
me. But the first time 1 ever knew 
anything about real prayer, if f have 
ever known anything about it, was 
when all my past life and daily walk 
rose up before me like mountains of 
sin and seemed to have fallen upon me 
and was crushing all my natural life 
from me. Therefore 1 found mysei 
by day looking for some secret place 
where 1 might try to beg the Lord for 
mercy on a poor lost sinner, and by 
night spending long hours in medi- 
tating over my lost condition and beg- 
ging the good Lord to show me win 
was the matter with me. 1 knew there 
was a great change but didn't know 
what it was, and I was afraid my 
wife would find out I was in trouble. 

While hi this condition I was made 
to have a desire to hear preaching. I 
had always believed the Primitive 
Baptists preached the truth but didn't 
care so much about hearing it, as most 
of them had some way I did not like. 
But 1 was made to hear them preach 
and would go and get in some place 
where they could not see me, because 
ihe preaching seemed different to me 
from what it had been, and they knew 
it, and were preaching directly to me. 
Sometimes at the close of the meeting 
seme of the dear brethren and sisters 
would shake hands with me and it 
would almost sink me into the ground 
because of my unworthiness of their 
notice. 

After some short time I was made to 
love the Primitive Baptists as ! never 
had before and, though unworthy, I 
now wanted to live with them. I went 
to meeting several times thinking I 
would offer, but did not, I think, until 
•aturiay aafara tka Irat Sunday ia 



August, 1911, when I went before coh- 
ference at Old Strawberry and told 
them a part of what f above related, 
i was received and the next morning- 
was baptized. This was a happy time 
with me. 

But soon came doubts and fears that 
i was deceived and had deceived peo- 
ple who appeared to me to be that 
precious chosen elect of the Most High 
God. 

Now as 1 have sketched along in my 
imperfect way with what 1 hope to be 
an experience of grace, I leave the 
same to your better judgment and 
come with a few remarks to what 1 
termed in the outset "a call to the 
ministry,'' feeling that what 1 may 
have to say in regard to the calling, 
if I have any, will be in connection 
with what ] have said, as 1 feel that 
both experience and calling is from 
the same fountain head, speaking His 
mighty works into effect showing that 
He will do all things according to the 
words of the prophets sent out to de- 
clare that He is God and will do all 
His pleasure. And if I am deceived 
in one I am deceived in both and the 
surprise and great mystery is that 
such a poor, ignorant, slow of speech 
mortal as I, should be led along this 
Way. What a mystery indeed. 

I am unlike anyone else it seems to 
me in many ways. My first attempt to 
speak in public was at a funeral and I 
was made to feel and do yet that that 
was the appointed time for me to make 
my first attempt. They tried to get a 
minister to hold the services and while 
they were trying I felt like they would 
fail. Not that I felt fit to make the 
attempt myself for I was made to wish 
I was miles away. 

My brother-in-law's child had died 
and the services were to be at my 
home. And after they failed to get a 
preacher I told a brother of how I had 
been burning within all that day — the 
lata 1 kid gattaa sa ktarj 1 felt I could 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



go 110 further — and asked him what he 
iiiought of niy trying to preach a few 
words. He told me to go ahead. Even 
then 1 sought au excuse and asked hini 
to gain permission from the child s 
fa tlier, secretly hoping he would ob- 
ject aud release me. But he consented 
readily, f made the attempt, though 
didn't say much, bilt feit some relief 
of mind. 

After this when the opportunity of- 
fered the brethren began to call on me 
to speak, and sometimes f would re- 
fuse, but most of the time, since f 
made the hist attempt, 1 have been 
made willing to olt'er such as f have. 

1 often think of what old brother 
Thos. Bell wrote, that he had been in 
the service a long time but had not yet 
learned to preach, i am young iii the 
cause, it in it at all, but could say 
amen to this confession of that dear 
old soldier of the cross; setting forth 
the idea that it is not in man to direct 
hi:, steps. Again the steps of a good 
iii; u are ordered of the Lord, &c. 

if it be the Lord's will 1 feel a de- 
sire to spend the balance of my days in 
the .Master's service. 1 don't feel to 
know any thing about preaching ex- 
cept it is a great mystery and that I s 
atii made to love it, however each at- 
tempt is made with great fear and 
trembling, knowing that without Him 
I can do nothing. I don't know 
whether or not He will bless me to 
speak again but if He does 1 desire at 
all times to bring to the blessed hearers 
glad tidings of great joy that will be 
of comfort, building up and for the 
making of peace and happiness among 
the dear people of God wherever I meet 
them. 

J have ii over been able to say much 
of myself in the stand, and have never 
told but very little of my experience 
while trying to preach; I have often 
felt glad that I was blessed with some- 
thing better than this failure to talk 
afcaat, but hart f*r noma taust h««n 



impressed to write as i have. However 
1 ieei it is very scattering and perhaps 
of no proht. 

A few words about my brethren 
and i will close, f wish to say they 
have manifested more confidence in 
me than i have in myself. A short 
while after 1 began to talk in public 
they licensed me and in less tnan two 
years they ordained me to the full 
w ork of the ministry. 1 have never 
felt worthy of such honor, neverthe- 
less d' the Lord is in the matter i desire 
not to look back. If indeed 1 have 
taken hold of the plow may the whole 
household of faith pray the good Lord 
that 1 may be enabled to lean upon 
His blessed staff and press forward 
ever looking unto Jesus the Author 
and iinisher of our faith. .Many have 
been the times 1 have promised myself 
never to speak in public again and at 
such times felt sure 1 had power to 
hold to my promise, but thanks be to 
His 'Great Name and Cause He con- 
tinues to lead me by ways 1 know not; 
wiien He does anything it is always 
right and when 1 do anything it is al- 
ways wrong. 

1 feel there could be much more 
added that would make this article of 
more profit, if some one else would 
take the pen, as I have just hinted at 
the subjects. 

I w ill close as I have written now 
more than I expected. 

Yours in hope of a better world aud 
in love of the gospel. 

W. R. DODD. 

AVliitmell, Va. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Gold: — Enclosed you 
will please find a check for $1.50 ' to 
pay for the Landmark one year for 
sister Mary E.' Gardner of Rocky 
Mount, N. C. 

After reading her letteu, with all the 
•ther good onw it laeiHad that mj 



246 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



whole heart went out to her, in love 
and sympathy. 

While 1 do not feel that 1 have much 
to give, I'm willing to divide the little 
1 have with all such, as are afflicted, i 
have never seen this sister, hut kcv>c 
it is the Lord's will that she may find 
relief from the treatment at the hos- 
pital. 

My health is abuut as usual. 
Trust you and yours are well. 
In much love, 

FANNIE \Y INSTEAD. 

Elm City, N. C. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Bro. Gold:— You will find en- 
closed a letter from sister Martha Ho- 
warth of Nyack, N. Y., written to me, 
and 1 have her consent to send it to 
you for publication. She was 73 years 
old last Aug. A dear sweet sister and 
writer. Her letters are sweet and 
comforting to me. . 

Your sister in the faith, I trust. 

MELISSA GRIMES. 

Dear Sister Melissa :— Your ever 
welcome letter was much enjoyed by 
me, and 1 am glad you are given 
courage to be steadfast in the truth. 
Wheti those who would persecute us, 
for the truth's sake, and find that Ave 
arc enabled, by grace divine, to be 
true to what the Lord has taught us, 
they often worry because they cannot 
destroy us. The friendship of the 
world is enmity with God and his peo- 
ple. 

I learned that truth many years ago. 
While working for relatives, they rid- 
iculed the truth and the church I 
loved. But greater is He that is for us 
than they that are against us. Jesus 
said to his disciples, "Rejoice and be 
exceeding glad: for great is your re- 
ward in heaven : for so persecuted they 
the prophets whiek were before you." 
Halt. 1:12. 



Also notice 1st verse of same chap- 
ter. "And seeing the multitudes, he 
went up into a mountain : and when he 
was set his disciples came unto him." 
(Not the multitudes,) and he opened 
his mouth, and taught them saying, 
"Blessed are the poor in spirit, for 
theirs is the kingdom of heaven." 

Who are the poor m spirit / Such as 
are taught of God to feel their poverty 
in soul. Not anything to bring for any 
needed blessing. Their 's is a poor, 
helpless, unworthy case. They are 
made to feel and know that without 
the blood and righteousness of the dear 
Redeemer they have no hope for salva- 
tion. They find they have broken the 
law of Moses, whicli condemns all 
transgressors. 

He that faileth in one point is guilty 
of all. I well remember how 1, for 
several years tried to keep the law, 
and when 1 realized that I had made 
a complete failure, these words sound- 
ed in my soul with power, "Christ is 
the end of the law for righteousness 
to every one that believeth. " At an- 
other time, while in bed, unable to 
sleep for sorrow, my mind reverted to 
Isaiah who was anointed to comfort 
all that mourn; "To appoint unto them 
that mourn in Zion, to give unto them 
beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for 
mourning, the garment of praise for 
the spirit of heaviness." 1 was greatly 
comforted, for 1 felt to be a mourner. 
I hope faith was given me to rightly 
apply these scriptures. Before this my 
sins were grievous to me. I had no 
strength to even hope in the mercy of 
Gocl, but now, at the appointed time, 
1 was given strength, I hope, to trust 
in the mercy of a sin pardoning God. 
I believe I did have true praise for 
Him in my soul, and was greatly com- 
forted under the sound of the gospel 
for a long time, then new trials, hard- 
to bear, came on, but I found that He 
who had sustained me hitherto, would 
kelp nae nay journey threugk, and give 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



247 



me caust to raise new Ebenezers to 
his praise. Many days have passed 
since then, and many changes have 
taken place in my feelings, yet I have 
been upheld till now. None but the 
dear Lord was able to hold me up and 
take care of me through these changes, 
but He is faithful and changes not. 
How precious is his name ! 

I did not intend to write this way 
today, but it is all true, I have learn- 
ed that His purposes will ripen fast, 
unfolding every hour. The bud may 
have a bitter taste, but sweet will be 
the flower. The new Signs came today, 
and T saw throe letters sent to Elder 
Ker for publication, one from you, one 
from Pro. Ruston and one from Sister 
Ruston. I very much enjoyed reading 
all of them. 1 have been suffering 
from rheumatism this week. All my 
times are in the hands of the dear 
Lord, and 1 should not complain when 
afflicted, for He has promised that as 
my days so shall my strength be, and 
He is faithful to every promise. When 
I heard Elder Durand preach last I 
wondered if I should ever hear him 
again. He said every thing changes 
but God and the gospel, and that the 
Lord's believing children are as help- 
less as babes, but are given divine life 
to cry to the God of mercy for susten- 
ance. Our natural minds cannot un- 
derstand spiritual things, for these 
things are hid from the wise and pru- 
dent and revealed unto babes. We 
know not anything of God outside of 
our own experience. "Make me to 
know how frail I am," These words 
impressed me forcibly while Elder Du- 
rand was preaching Dec. 20 last. I 
wrote them down. Elder Mc. Connell 
is a faithful good preacher and I hope 
he may be given long life. The aged 
ministers are passing away, but the 
Lord will not leave himstlf without a 
witness. Hope you are well. Please 
excuse this poor letter written with 
an imperfect pen. 



Your unworthy sister, I hop«, im 
bonds of love. 

MARTHA A. IIOYYARTH. 



"SPEAK THOU THE THINGS 
THAT BECOME SOUND DOC- 
TRINE." 

Doctrine is something taught and is 
either true or false. God is a Sover- 
eign in the very highest sense of that 
term. He said, by the mouth of Ihaiah 
tin- prophet, I am God and beside me 
there is none else: seeing the end from 
the beginning and from ancient times 
things that are not yet done; and by 
the pen of the Apostle Paul, "work- 
el h all things after the council of His 
own will. 

Isaiah says, He creates the world that 
it might be inhabited. The apostle 
John says, He made all things that 
were made. 

We take it from the foregoing that 
God is a God of purpose, and that His 
purpose will be carried out to the let- 
ter. He has all power in heaven, in 
earth and all deep places. If He could 
not have controlled sin He would not 
have allowed it to enter the world. He 
said to Pharoah, King of Egypt, for 
this cause have I raised thee up that 
I might show forth my power in thee. 

When God created the world and all 
tilings therein, including man, He 
pronounced them good and very good. 
He afterwards formed man and 
breathed into his nostrils the breath of 
life and man became a living soul. 
Man's environments in his primeval 
state, seemed to be perfect. In this 
state of seeming happiness he was 
given a law with a penalty annexed to 
the violation thereof, and He knew 
that that law would be executed if vi- 
olated. Paul says, the man was not 
deceived but the woman being de- 
ceived was in the transgression. God 
forseeing what man would do prepared 
a Savior even before he (man) was 



24$ 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



created, and a portion of his posterity 
chosen in that Savior when as yet 
there were none of them. Paul says, 
blessed be the God and Father of our 
Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, who 
hath blessed ns with all spiritual bless- 
ings in Christ according as He hath 
chosen us in Christ before the founda- 
tion of the world, and to the end that 
they might be holy and without blame 

The punishment inflicted upon our 
first parents for violating God's law 
was that they should be cast out of 
their beautiful home, (which home was 
a striking type of the paradise of our 
God;) and that the man should toil for 
a living and that the woman should 
bear children and be subject to her 
husband. After the inhabitants of the 
eartli had increased, men began to 
call upon the name of the Lord. The 
two first born were representative 
characters; the oldest representing 
false religion, the younger the true. 
"That is not first which is spiritual 
but that which is natural and after- 
ward that which is spiritual." The 
first had man manufactured faith, the 
second a God given faith. 

The attempt by men to build a tower 
whose top would reach to heaven, at a 
very early age of the world, was a sig- 
nal failure, notwithstanding men of 
the same faith have been trying the 
same experiment ever since, even un- 
to this enlightened age of the world, 
which proves demonstratively, that 
the world, by wisdom, knows not God. 

Abraham was called out of a king- 
dom of darkness and translated into 
a kingdom of light and shown by God 
the land that the Lord promised to give 
him for an inheritance for his poster- 
ity. He believed God and it was ac- 
counted to him for righteousness. 
Jesus said Abraham rejoiced to see my 
day and he saw it and was glad. Moses 
saw it also. He said a prophet shall 
the Lord your God raise up to you 



like unto me. Him shall ye hear in all 

things. Daniel also saw it when h« 
prophesied that in the days of these 
kings will God set up a kingdom that 
Avould stand forever. Isaiah also 
spoke of it, when king Uzziah died I 
saw the Lord, high and lifted up, and 
his train filled the temple. Paul rec- 
ognized the voice of the Saviour when 
he said, Saul, Saul, why persecutes*? 
thou me. In as much as he had been 
persecuting His followers he did it 
unto him. This knowledge of God 
was all by divine revelation, the only 
way that any one ever has or ever will 
know God, whom to know is eternal 
life. ' 

It was strange news to the learned 
man Nicodcmus when the Savior told 
him except a man be born again he 
could not see or enter the kingdom of 
God. 

The world by wisdom has never 
know God, but His ministers preach a 
hidden wisdom which none of the 
princes of this world knew for had 
they had known it they would not have 
crucified the Lord of Glory. All that 
the Father gave the Son will receive a 
knowledge of their inheritance in due 
or at the proper time. 

Paul says, I am persuaded that 
neither life or death, principalities or 
powers, things present or things to 
come shall be able to separate us from 
the love of God which is in Christ 
Jesus, our Lord. The sacrificial offer- 
ing of Christ has been, is now and will 
be to the end of time effectual in the 
salvation of His people. He was as a 
lamb slain from the foundation of the 
world. No man knoweth who the Son 
-is but the Father, neither knoweth any 
man the Father but the Son and he to 
whom the Son will reveal Him. 

There is only One way for men a in I 
women to learn that there is no good 
in the flesh, and that way is by an in- 
dividual revelation in the hearts - 
Christ in the soul the hope of glor> . 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



243 



All in a state of nature think they can 
do something to ingratiate themselves 
in the sight of God, but when Divine 
light shines in the heart and mind it 
reveals to them their true condition. 
When that takes place there is no use 
to tell one to pray or invite him or her 
lo the mourner's bench. If he should 
lose the power of speech the very 
breathing of bis soul would be prayer 
to God for mercy and every bench or 
chair he chances to sit on is a mourn- 
er's bench or a mourner's chair. 

Some go to the law for justification, 
but its not to be found there. The law 
condemns. The poet has truly said : 

"They fly from works to Jesus' blood, 
Vet prove' by works they are born of 
God." 

The Apostle Paul told Timothy not 
to be ashamed of the testimony of the 
Lord nor of him his prisoner, but to 
be a partaker of the afflictions of the 
gospel according to the power of God 
who hath saved us and called us not 
according to our works but according 
to His purpose and grace which was 
given us in Christ Jesus before the 
world began. 

To the King eternal, immortal, invis- 
ible be praise, dominion and power. 

JAMES M. SIMMONS. 

Boyle, Miss. 



EASTERN UNION. 
The Eastern Union is to be held 
with the church at Pungo, and to 
commence on Friday before the 5th 
Sunday in May. 

All lovers of truth are invited to 
attend, especially ministers. "We have 
but one ordained minister. 

A. W. AMBROSE, 

Union Clerk. 



Elder J. T. Collier's address is 
changes from Kenly, N. C, R. F. D. to 
Micro, N. G. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



"Remove not 


the ancient landmark 


which thy 


fathers have set." 


P. D. GOLD, 


Wilson, N. C. 


P. G. LESTER, 


Floyd, Va. 


VAT "^T VI 1 f 
\ yJlJ. .A-Li V ill. 


MmvrRTri? 11 

IN Ul\iiJii.n i.i . 


Entered at the 


post office at Wilson as 


second 


class matter. 


WILSON, N. 


C, APRIL 15, 1915. 



EDITORIAL 



SINGING. 

"Let the word of Christ dwell in 
you richly m all wisdom; teaching and 
admonishing one another in Psalms 
and hymns and spiritual songs, singing 
with grace ?n your heax*ts to the 
Lord," Col. 3:1b. 

The gospel is the song of songs. It 
was heard by the shepherds in the 
land of Judah. (praise) at the birth of 
the Son of man. the Son of God, yet no 
man's son. From eternity, without 
beginning of days, or end of life, with- 
out father, or mother, or descent, he 
appeared to Abraham as priest of the 
Most High God. A song was heard in 
the land of Judah by the shepherds, as 
they by night kept watch over their 
flocks. Lo an angel of the Lord ap- 
peared and said to the shepherds, "I 
bring you glad tidings of great joy, 
which shall be to all people. For unto 
you is born 'his day in the city of 
David a Saviour, which is Christ the 
Lord," Luke M il. And suddenly there 
was with the anpel a multitude of the 
heavenly host praising God and say- 



2f>0 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



ing, ''Glory tu Uod in the highest, and 
on earth peace, good will toward 
men." 

The gospel is praise to God. It 
makes glad the heart. As the good 
Mine it cheers the heart of God and 
man. The law proclaims, reveals, the 
wrath of God from heaven against all 
ungodliness and unrighteousness of 
men, who hold the truth in unright- 
eousness. 

By the law is the knowldge of sin. 
The law worketh wrath. There can be 
no song, no true praise to God, no joy 
of spiritual song in the heart, where 
there is no love of God, no light of his 
countenance shining in the heart. The 
gospel is the song of praise to God. He 
takes us out of the mire and the clay, 
and puts a new song in our mouth, 
even praise to Cod. When this song is 
put in the heart and mouth it sings 
glory to God, and peace on earth, good 
will to men. It was sung at the Red 
Sea when Tsrael knew his enemies 
were slain. It is called the song of 
Moses the servant of God and of the 
Lamb. 

At the end of the dark, bitter bond- 
age of sin and death, when the Lord 
turns our captivity and makes his face 
to shine upon us, by lifting upon us 
the light of his countenance, then we 
sing a new song. All Israel sing that 
song. It ascribes greatness to our 
God, salvation is of the Lord. This 
song is sung only in the land of Judah. 
Tt is never sung in Babylon. The night 
of weeping nnd sorrow is turned into 
a morning of rejoicing, a morning 
without a cloud. 

In order for one to sing there must 
be gladness ruid joy in the heart. The 
heart must be set to the tune of praise 
to God. There must be a new creature, 
new surroundings, new joy. There 
must be love, joy, peace, delight in the 
Lord. There must be the shining of 
the sun of righteousness in the soul. 
There cannot be a discord in the song. 



Xo fault is found of the Lord Jesus. 
There not only cannot be be any fault, 
but there must be fullness of praise 
"Bejoiee evermore. Pray without 
ceasing. In (very thing give thanks, 
for this is the will of God in Christ 
Jesus concerning you," 1st Thess. 
5:16-18. When the Holy Ghost chords 
ones heart to sing this song, which is 
ever new, there is no jar, no discord, 
no fault finding of the doctrine of God 
our Saviour, nor of any of his works. 
All his works pTaise him, and his 
saints shall bless him. Praise waits 
for God in Ziou. It is one Lord, one 
faith, one baptism, even as ye are call- 
ed in one hope of your calling. There 
is great pea 'e in this soul feast, mak- 
ing melody in your hearts to the Lord. 

As on the day of Pentecost they were 
all with one accord, one mind, one will, 
in one plac3, there is peace in the 
heart, in the conscience, melody, 
praise in the bfe, obedience in the 
spirit, will or mind of him that is led 
by the Spirit of God. There is not on- 
ly no war, nor jar, nor discord, but 
there is but one song. "And in that 
day thou shalt say, 0 Lord, I will 
praise thee : though thou wast angry 
with me, thine anger is turned away, 
and thou eomfortest me. Behold, God 
is become mi' salvation; I will trust 
and not be afraid : for the Lord Jeho- 
vah is my strength and my song: he 
also is become my salvation. There- 
fore with joy shall ye draw water out 
of the wells of salvation. And in that 
day shall ye say, Praise the Lord, call 
upon his name, declare his doings 
amonqr the people, make mention that 
his name is exalted. Sing unto the 
Lord : for lie hath done excellent 
things: this is known in all the earth. 
Cry out nnd shout thou inhabitant of 
Zion: for gr*3at is the Holv One of 
Tsrael in the midst of thee." Tsni. 12: 
1-6. 

This inhah'tant is not sick, nor un- 
reconciled to Cod. There is in the old 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



251 



man, tiiat which is contrary to God, 
but with the mind this inhabitant of 
Zion walks about Zion, not lame, find; 
no cause of howling or complaining, 
keeps his body under, mortities his 
members which are upon earth, has no 
fellowship with the unfruitful works 
of darkness, has uo secret confabs or 
talks with the enemy, is not found in 
the haunts of night walkers, is no 
whisperer, has no tongue to scatter 
firebrands that cause discord in Zion. 
But this one born in Zion loves her 
gates of praise, and admires her tow- 
ers, and speaks that Zion shall live for- 
ever because her God is from everlast- 
ing to everlasting. 

Heaven is the perfect state of praise 
and salvation. The sweet employ of 
heaven is to sing the song ever new 
that no man can learn save he to whom 
it is given, because God puts that song 
in the mouth and girds the new man 
with eternal iife. Not unto us, not un- 
us, but unto thy name be all the praise. 

W hen in the Spirit it is the Lord's 
day. Then trie words of the mouth 
and the meditation of the heart are 
right and acceptable in the sight of 
God, our Saviour, it is the work of 
faith, and tiie labor of love, and the 
patience of hope. The life is the reve- 
lation of Jeods Christ, and is to the 
praise of the glory of his grace, and is 
in conformity to the will of God. It is 
the light of God shining in the sub- 
ject of grace, and glorifies God in the 
body and spirit which belong to Ciod. 
This is the spirit that serves the Lord, 
and it makes melody to the Lord. Sucu 
are created in Christ Jesus unto good 
Works, which God hath foreordaii I 
that they should walk in them 
atony with Cod's will and word, and 
are to the praise of the glory of his 
grace. 

Here in spirit is a new heaven and a 
new earth in Christ Jesus. When the 
Lord turns our captivity all God's 
works praise him. Sun, moon and 



stars, the flowing streams, woods, 
earth and air, the hills and the vallies, 
stormy wind, rain, hail and snow, ail 
God's works praise him. Every word 
of Cod then is good, and it is sweet to 
obey him and trust him in the spirit 
and grace of truth. 

Love binds and sweetly draws the 
people of God when they are in the 
spirit of truth. 

"Behold how good and how pleas- 
ant it is for brethren to dwell together 
in unity." | S| | 

P. D. G. 



HEALING POW$R. 

' Neither do 1 condemn thee: go, and 
sin no more," John 8:11. 

1. There was an effort made by the 
scribes and Pharisees to entrap Jesus, 
in order thai they might accuse him, 
They bring a woman taken in adultery, 
and set her in the midst and say, Moses 
commanded to stone such, but what 
sayest thou? This they said that they 
might have to accuse him. Thev 
thought that if he condemned her 
they could accuse him of rebellion 
against the Woman government. Moses 
said if one is guilty of adultery Let 
such be stoned to death. Now if Jesus 
said the same it would furnish them an 
opportunity to accuse Jesus, because 
the Roman government had taken away 
from the Jews all right to put any one 
to death. But if he did not enforce thi 
law of Moses, they could charge that 
he was an enemy to the law of Moses. 
So they considered that they had a 
dead case against him, it mattered not 
how he answered. 

2. What a sad and desperate condi- 
tion and state of mind these enemies 
of Jesus were in : but how safe and 
blessed was the condition of those that 
heard Jesus gladly. 

THE NATURE OF SIN. "The sin 
of Judah is written with a pen of iron, 
and with the ooint of a diamond : it is 



252 



ZiON'S LANDMABK. 



graven upon tiie tabic of their heart, 
and upon Uie horns oi your altars: Jer. 
11:1. \\hat could, blot out tncir sin 
fastened with tiie pen of iron, and tiie 
ponit oi a diamond.; and engraven up- 
on the table oi then? heart, and upou 
the horus of your altars i That is the 
nature of their worship. The more 
false worship one performs the deeper 
the sin. What can blot it out? Noth- 
ing that men <-an do or suffer. 
3. But Jesus is manifest in the Mesh 
to take away sin — to make an md of 
sin. The strength of sin is the law. 
Christ is become the end of the law for 
righteousness to every one that be- 
lie veth. ij 

4. How dui he do this? He stooped 
down to earth. He came from heaven. 
When the scribes and Pharisees, who 
professed to be the teachers and the 
observers of the law of Moses, were 
clamoring ag iinst him for a judgment, 
or expression of his mind on the case 
of this woman, he stooped down and 
with his finger wrote on the ground. 
We are not told what he wrote. But 
how wonderful was the act. He stoop- 
ed down and wrote with his finger, not 
with a pen of iron, or the point of a 
diamond. God wrote the law with his 
finger on two tables of stone. But 
when one writes on the ground how 
soon and easily that is rubbed out and 
gone. Jesus stooped down to earth 
and humbled himself to death. 

Did you ever think how the earth 
opens her mouth and swallows down 
the filth of earth, and it is buried and 
gone, no more to return. Continually 
the filth of man and his deeds are hid, 
buried, gone in the bowels of the 
earth. The foul, sickening smells of 
filth are drunk in and gone in the 
earth. "What a deodorizer of foul, 
sickening smells is drunk in and bur- 
ied by the kind earth? 

"When Jesus lifted himself up he 
•aid, he that is without sin among you 
!•( kirn ti*ft < >•( a tt«»« at W Tkt 



law of Moses said, let the accuser ol 
the guilty one cast the first stone. The 
witness must not be guilty. How coma 
a guilty person be a witness against 
one accused.' You sec Jesus was fui 
tilling the spirit of the law of Mose^ 
which he ca.'ie to do. Hence how 
searching his question. H»w can s 
condemn another if 1 am also guilty . 
Let him thai is without sin cast ti;. j 
first stone. 

Then again he stooped down and 
wrote on the ground. What was tkt 
effect of this wonderful judgment. 
They began the eldest first to leav ; 
there, being :;'iilty in their own con- 
science, until every accuser was gone, 
and the woman was left alone with 
Jesus. He '•aid unto her, woinai, 
where are thy accusers? Hath no man 
condemned thee" She said, no raai, 
Lord. Then said Jesus unto her. 
neither do 1 condemn thee, Go and siu 
no more. No doubt his healing, for 
giving word cut such hatred againsi, 
uncleanness in her heart that she lend 
a clean life after this. He shaU bless 
every one of you in turning you away 
from your irJquities. 

5. How full and suggestive the con 
duct of Jesus here of what he came Ori 
earth to do. He had power to lay 
down his life — to stoop to earth. He 
had power to lift himself up. By his 
death and .csurrection sin is buried 
in the earth, is gone, forgiven, to be 
remembered no more. But he stooped 
down the second time and wrote on the 
ground. This shows that we contin 
ually need his forgiving mercy, tha- 
the life that we now live in the flesh 
we live by the faith of the Ron of God. 
Our High Priest is touched with the 
feeling of o"r infirmities. 

It is good, needful that we should 
ever remember that we are still iia • 
flesh and should forgive others. If we 
forgive not our brethren how shall we 
hr forgiven. 

C. TW« skall he a new htivea and 



ZION'S LANDMARK- 



a new earth The earth with its works 
shall be burued up : but there shall be 
a new heaven, aud a new earth where- 
in dwelieth righteousness. The Lord 
shall make ail things new. There shall 
be no more remembrance of sin. The 
sin of Judah shall be sought but not 
found. Isai. 44:22. 

We shall be fashioned like unto his 
glorious bodv How wonderful shall 
the resurrection be, old things passed 
away: behold all things become new. 

P. D. G. 



TO APPEAR W*TH JESUS AND BE 
LIKE HIM. 

"Behold, now are we the sons of God 
and it doth not yet appear what we 
shall be: but we know that when he 
shall appear, we shall be like him; for 
we shall see him as he is." 1st John 
3:2. • - | 

Behold what manner of love that 
v e should be called the sons of God. 
Jt is an unnatural, an uncommon love. 
It is the lov.» of God. There is noth- 
ing like it imong men. God is love. 
The world knows not the people of 
_God, because it knows not God. Be- 
loved, now _ve we the sons of God, and 
it doth not yet appear what we shall 
be : but w- e know that when he shall 
appear we -hali be like him, for we 
shall see him as he is. 

A few years ago, one night the Lord 
Jesus appeared to me as the Son of 
man. He stood in front of me as the 
Son of man. Before that I thought 1 
had some idea of a man, but then I 
saw that I did not know what a trui 
man is, nor had I ever had a conception 
of what such a man is. Then I saw 
that we are only a trash gang. 

Jesus stoo'J before me as a man — as 
the Son of man. His eyes were love. 
He looked at me in my face. In his 
form and co mtenance or visage as a 
man there nas mingled, blended, all 
tit MMliaNt of M«r«y, pity, ion pas- 



sion and gentleness, with power, 
strength, harness and dominion, all 
sinning in such peilect and mingled 
glory so pettectly mat all the colors 
ot light shone in beauty altogether 
lovely. Thsre was every perfection of 
patience wita strength, righteousness 
with iorgive-iess, justice tempered 
with mercy, infinity with pity. He was 
altogether Ijvely, the clneiest among 
ten thousands. 1 felt that 1 desired to 
fall down in tie dust and love and wor- 
ship him forever It was shown me 
and 1 did not doubt it then, in the 
glory of that Ught, that as I had borne 
the image of Adam the hrst in mortal- 
ity so 1 should awake with the likeness 
of Jesus in t:ie resurrection, and should 
be like him. it is in his light that we 
see light, i knew then that when 1 
should see him I would be like him. 
This vision was one of the most won- 
derful views that has ever appeared 
to me. For days it was with me. 

When Jesus shall appear we shall 
be like him, 'or we shall see him as he 
is. Flesh and blood shall be gone. He 
shall change this vile body, and fash- 
ion it like unto his glorious body, and 
we shall be hke him ; we shall see him 
as he is. 

I know there shall be a resurrection 
of the dead. The scriptures tell the 
truth about ihese things, and the reve- 
lations of Josus are supported, wit- 
nessed by tin scriptures of truth, the 
blessed word of God. 

When we ««re no longer in the flesh 
but in Spirit the former things shall 
be done away, and we shall see Jesus 
as he is, and rhall be like him, and be 
satisfied. 

Christ in the one born of God is the 
blessed hope of the resurrection life. 
Every one that hath this hope in him 
purifieth himself even as he is pure. 
Tn my case the difficulty in part is that 
T am not as T hope I wish to be. but 
am vile. But the blessed hope is that 
wk«« J«»n« appttrt i» glory I skall 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



appear with hiin, for • shall see hiin as 
he is and. shall be like him. 

P. D. G. 



DO YOU RIDE? 

Some people are very fond of rid- 
ing. Keally it is better, if we are able, 
to walk, dome people that have 
wealth of money, and can buy convey- 
ance and ride, would esteem it a great 
privilege if they could rise, take up 
their bed, and walk. The natural ex- 
ercise which :s most healthy, most use 
ful, most pleasant is walking. Jesus 
never, as we are informed, except as 
with his mocker, they tied into P-^gypt 
to escape Herod's envy, and when he 
rode into Jerusalem, fulfilling the 
scripture, Behold 0 daughter of Zion, 
thy King cometh unto thee meek an A 
lovely &c. Then he did not own wha„ 
he rode upon. 

If you have a conveyance and ar> ; 
not able to walk it is nice and conven- 
ient to use It. But spending money as 
many do feeding their vanity, and 
spending so nuch time and money, .i. 
not wise, nor is it healthy. Walking 
is the natural and healthy exercise ci 
our bodies. 

To walk with Cod is the most usefu'. 
and healthful exercise. In ancient 
time there was one that walked with 
God, and it was such good walk that 
lie never died. Enoch walked with 
God, and he was not for God took 
him. 

To walk with God is to be agreed 
with God, to commune with God, dwell 
with God, not to be contrary to God. 
Can two walK together unless thsy 
be agreed? 

P. D. G. 



SELF-DENIAL. 

Brother Jerry Jenkins requests my 
view of Luk3 14:20, "If any man 
eome to me, and hate not hie father 



and mother, and wife and children, and 
brethren and sisters, yea and his own 
life also, he cannot be my disciple." 

The sacrifice is the leaving of all, 
forsaking all for Christ. One of the la-it 
things, we do ; s to deny self. We eai 
deny others, prefer ourselves to others. 
This is natural, is the thought, desire 
and purpose of one in nature. Indeed 
all of us in iinture will favor self, and 
seek self in preference to others. The 
way of following is forsaking. 

Jesus speciries, " if any man come .o 
me, and hate not his father, his mother 
and wife, and children, &., he cannot 
be my disci pie. He must also hate 
himself. He must also bear his cross. 
He that will t-ave his life shall lose it 
He that will lay down his life for 
Jesus' sake shall find it. 

How can this be reconciled wiih 
the teaching that a man must honor 
his father and his mother, must love 
his wife. Does not the bible teach 
that husbands should love their wives : 
Husbands love your wives, even ts 
Christ also loved the church, and gave 
himself for it. 

Does not the scripture teach thai 
is the fulfilling of the law. Love works 
no ill to your neighbor. Yes, Behold 
how these brethren love one another. 
He that loveth is born of God, for God 
is love. 

If we love not our brother whom we 
have seen how can we love God whom 
we have not seen. We know that we 
have passed from death unto life be- 
cause we love the brethren. Whosoever 
hateth his brother is a murderer. Now 
how can these things be true, how are 
they true? If a man sees himself in his 
true character does he not abhor him- 
self, does he not hate himself. When 
Job saw himself in his true light he ab- 
horred himself, and said, behold I am 
vile. Why did he hate himself? Be- 
cause he saw thai his own nature was 
hateful. Instead therefore of gratify- 
ing that vile nature he mortified it. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



25', 



He hated himself and seeing more of 
that vile nature in himself than he saw 
in any one else, he hated his own life, 
and denied himself. He saw that this 
is the natural principle of all flesh, 
therefore he Jiated all flesh. This feel- 
ing included father, mother, brother, 
sister, and all mankind in the sense 
that all nesh is grass, and I know that 
in me, that is in my nesh, there dwells 
no good thing. It is the flesh or carnal 
principle which is enmity against God, 
that is hated. Dut there is love and 
good lo them as creatures of God. So 
that the grace of God does cause as to 
love our enemies, and to rightly re- 
gard them as entitled to all the favor 
we are entitled to. and that we are 
vile as they. 

The carnal principle of nature, when 
we are in our right mind, is less excus- 
able, and appears worse in ourselves, 
than it does in others, and we can for- 
give the wrong doings of others better 
than we can excuse or forgive our own 
misdoings. Indeed we cannot forgive 
or excuse our own sins when we are 
alive from the dead. 

We can see the beauty of the chris- 
tian character in others in whom we 
see the spirit of Jesus better, more 
clearly, than we can see it in ourselves. 
We henceforth know no man after the 
flesh. 

Taking up the cross, denying self, 
and following Jesus is the daily cross 
for us. Failing to do the good we feel 
unworthy to attempt, and being bur- 
dened with ; law of sin in our mem- 
bers warring against the law of our 
minds, there is n daily cross to bear. It 
is fighting the good fight of faith, and 
it is to bo endured to the end. The flesh 
is contrary to the spirit, and the spirit 
to the flesh, and those are in opposition 
the one to the other, so that we cannot 
do the things we would. 

Rut by the grace of God wo are what 
we are, and by grace we are saved 
through fa}th, and that not of our- 



selves. It is the gift of God. Our pleas- 
ure is not then in self, but in self-de- 
nial. It is in the faith of Jesus we 
overcome the world. The good will we 
have toward men is the working of the 
gospel in tlu mind we are blest with 
to do that which is right toward men, 
on the principle that we love that 
which is good, and profitable unto men. 
The life of faith is a higher life than 
the natural, fleshly, mortal life. As 
(iod sends his rain on the just and the 
unjust, and there is no partiality with 
God, so when the faith of the Son of 
God dwells in us we have good will to 
men, and do right to others whether 
they do right to us or not, and love 
truth because it is truth, and hate evil 
because it is cveil. 

P. D. G. 



WISDOM. 

"And my delights were with the sons 
of men," Prov. 8:31. 

Under the perfect word of wisdom 
the Lord Jesus is personified. The 
choicest words, thoughts, ideas and 
expressions' of language, and the most 
valuable substances in nature are em- 
ployed to set forth the riches of Jesus. 

Tribute is imposed on the richest 
things in creation to utter the praises 
of our glorious King in Zion. 

One said to him, who is he Lord, 
that I might believe on him? It is said 
in Proverbs, I wisdom dwell with pru- 
dence, and find cut knowledge of witty 
inventions. The chastest of companions 
dwell with wisdom. In perfect wisdom 
there is no folly, nor is there any fail- 
ure. There must be perfection in the 
works of God somewhere, because 
nothing is made in vain, and all God's 
works praise him. 

Tn the prudential reign of the Lord 
Jesus there Mn be no blunder. 

The Lord possessed Jesus in the be- 
ginning of his way, so that he was 
set up from evei lasting. Without Jesus, 



251 



ZJON'S LANDMARK. 



it is said nothing was made that was 
made. In him was life and the life was 
the light of men Then God said, Let ns 
make man in our image. Then God has 
put great honor upon man. One says 
when I consider thy heavens, the work 
of thy fingers, the moon and the stars 
which thou hast ordained: What is 
man that then art mindful of him, or 
the son of man thou visitest him &c. 

When God made man he made him 
in his own image. Jesus called him- 
eslf the Son of man. One night a few 
years ago he appeared to me as the 
son of man. T had thought that I 
knew something of man until then. But 
then I saw that we are a trash-gang. 
Such beauty, strength, perfection, 
mercy dwelling with justice, compas- 
sion with strength, eternity with the 
weakness of man. In Jesus was sen- 
tered all fulness as a man. I felt like 
lying down 'n the dust and worship- 
ping him forever. His eyes were fast- 
ened on me in love. I was shown that 
I should be like him in the resurrec- 
tion, and should be satisfied. 

As we have borne the image of Adam 
the first man, to shall the same we be 
made like unto Jesus, the second man. 
in the resurrection life, when this cor- 
ruptible shall put on incorruption, and 
death shall be swallowed up of life. He 
shall change our vile body. As we have 
borne the image of the earthy we shall 
also bear the image of the heavenly. 
The Lord Jesus Christ shall change our 
vile body that it may be fashioned 
like unto his glorious body, according 
to the working whereby he is able 
even to subdue all things unto himself, 
Phil. 3 :21. 

Tn all the work of creation Jesus as 
wisdom was present with the Father, 
and without him nothing was made 
that was made. He is made unto us 
(his people") wisdom, righteousness, 
sanctification and redemption. Jesus 
then dwelt with the Father, and then 
his delights were with the sons of men. 



Then that perfect wisdom ia Jesus 

shall accomplish in glorious, inrinite 
perfection all that was purposed in 
crtatiou. 

Jesus delighted to do the will of his 
Father. He says thy law is within my 
heart. I delight to do thy will 0 God. 
The delights and perfection of heaven 
he brings to earth. In all the affliction 
of his people, sinners in the transgres- 
sion of Adam, and passing into death, 
He J esus, as th» ir surety comes to do 
the will of God in earth; so he who 
knew no sin is made sin for them, that 
they might be made the righteousness 
of God in him. He, being in the form 
of God thought it not robbery to be 
equal with God; h ,t made himself of 
no reputation, and took upon him the 
form of a .servant, and was made in 
the likeness of men: And being found 
in fashion as a man he humbled him- 
self, an dbecame obedient unto death, 
even the death of the cross. Through 
his poverty we are made rich. He 
gave himself for us. 

In the wonderful creation of God, 
wherein Jesns (wisdom) was one with, 
the Father, that purpose of God in cre- 
ation was comprehended by Jesus. 
Hence wheu by the disobedience of 
one many were made sinners, so that 
death passed up on all, Jesus took up- 
on himself the form of the servant, and 
humbled himself to the death of the 
cross, that we through his poverty 
might be rich, ft was his delight to do 
the will of his Father, fulfilling and be- 
coming the end of the first testament, 
that, the blessings of the new covenant 
shall crown his people, the sons of men 
with his glory. His delights were 
with the sons of men. 

The Son of man is come to seek and 
to save that which was lost. His com- 
panionship is with men. He reeeiveth 
sinners and eateth with them. His joy 
and pleasure, his delights are with the 
sons of men. 
It is in the nature of vain, proud man 



ETON'S LANDMARK. 



257 



to be elevated, promoted lie thinks, so 
as to be numbered with the honorable 
of earth. But Jesus made himself of 
no reputation, and took upon himself 
the form of a servant, and was hum- 
bled to the shameful death of the 
eross, that we through his poverty 
might be rich, lie condescends to men 
of low estate. He who knew no sin 
was made sin for us, that we might be 
made the righteousness of God in him. 
He bare our sins in his own body on 
the tree, and was made a curse for us, 
that we might in his righteousness and 
through his differing be made tit for 
heaven. He was found in fashion as a 
man for the suffering of death, that he 
might be made perfect through suffer- 
ing, and thus become the author of 
eternal salvation, or present and fu- 
ture complete salvation, to all that 
obey him, that love and serve him. All 
that the Father gives to him he re- 
ceives, and are heirs of (3od and joint 
heirs with Christ. He shall present 
them before his Father's throne with 
all the honor and glory of immortality 
in his own unfading, eternal glory. 

He puts his beauty on them. He 
purges them from sin and dead works. 
He blesses them by turning, and in 
turning them from sin and dead works 
to serve the true and living God. He 
loves them \\ ith an everlasting love. 
He opens to them the glorious myster- 
ies of heavenly knowledge and heaven- 
ly salvation. He is himself formed in 
them the hope of glory. He communes 
with them. He delights in them, and 
ionors them, and shall present them 
before his Father's throne with exceed- 
ing joy to the praise of the glory of his 
grace, and they shall shine in the king- 
dom of glory as the reward given to 
Jesus, the travail of his soul with whom 
he shall be satisfied as he shall present 
them before his Father's throne with- 
out spot or wrinkle, or any such thing 
saying, behold I and the children which 
thou hast given me. P. D. G. 



A STATEMENT. 

We feel that it is right that we 
should, once or twice a year, publish 
a statement concerning our debt here 
in Kinston. 

Our last report showed that we had, 
in May, 1914, bought church property 
here hi Kinston for $5,0U0, and that 
we had paid one half cash. 

We wished to make a payment in No- 
vember, 1914, but could not do so. 

1 am writing" now to let you all 
know how much money we have on 
hand, and from what source it came. 

We have on hand $243.70. 

$35.50 of this amount has come to 
us through 13ro. Cayce's kindness in 
giving us the money for all subscrip- 
tions we (and others) secured for his 
paper, "The Primitive .Baptist. " 

52.50 has been given to us by Bap- 
tists and friends in amounts from 25 
cents up to $5.00. 

The remaining amount of $155.70 
has been gotten together by a few sis- 
ters and their friends, who, since last 
May, have met together one afternoon 
in every week and worked; taking 
sewing home with them to finish and 
each one giving 25 cents every month 
to increase die fund. 

They are working and hoping that 
the proceeds- from their work during 
.March and April will bring the $155.76 
up to $200.00. 

There are very few Baptists in Kins- 
ton ; only four brethren — every one of 
whom is over sixty years old, but 'we 
w ill do all that we are able to do to 
lessen this debt in May. 

No church lias been organized here 
yet, l»nt Bro. L. II. Hardy preaches for 
us every 3rd Sunday and at night. We 
will he glad if other ministers, when 
making appointments to preach, will 
remember us; and we will appreciate 
any help that is given us towards pay- 
ing this debt. 

Yours in Christian fellowship, 

JOHN H. DAWSON. 



258 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



PRESBYTERY. 

In obedience to a call made by the 
church at Gilliam's, Alamance County, 
N. C, and after preaching by Elder C. 
A. Davis, of Kernersville, ft. C, and 
brother J. W. Gilliam, Jr., of Gilliam's, 
the following presbytery- was appoint- 
ed to examine the calling and qualifi- 
cations of brother J. W. Gilliam, Jr., 
to-wit: Elders C. F. Denny, W. C. 
Jones, C. A. Davis, B. B. McKinney, 
and the deacons from sister churches 
present were invited to sit, as follows: 
Brethren T. A. Stanfield, (Pleasant 
Grove,) A. G. Porterfield, (McCray's,) 
Geo. W. Brooks, (Harmony,) John W. 
Gilliam, Sr., (Gilliam's,) and J. J. Idol, 
(Abbotts Creek.) 

After examining the call and quali- 
fications of brother J. W. Gilliam, Jr., 
and finding him sound, we hereby ex- 
tend to him all the liberties and func- 
tions of the Gospel Ministry. 

Done by order of the Presbytery and 
signed. 

ELDER C. F. DENNY, 

Moderator. 
ELDER W. C. JONES, 
ELDER C. A. DAVIS, 
ELDER B. B. McKINNEY. 

T. A. STANFIELD, Clerk. 

J. W. GILLIAM, Sr. 

A. G. PORTERFIELD, 

GEO. W. BROOKS, 

J. J. IDOL, 

Deacons. 

Alatamahaw, N. C. April 11. 1915. 



UNION MEETING. 

The next session of the Contentnea 
Union is appointed to be held with the 
church at Nahunta, Wayne County, N. 
C Saturday and 5th Sunday in May. 

Elder A. M. Crisp is appointed to 
preach the introductory sermon and 
Elder D. A. Mewborn his alternate. 

Brethren that wish to come to the 
Union by rail will be met at Pikeville, 



N. C, and Goldsboro, N. C, on Friday 
before the 5th Sunday in May. 

Those wishing to come please write 
to Elder T. B. Lancaster, Saulston, N. 
C, R. 1, Box 21 and brother V. A. 
Bartlett at Saulston, N. C, R. 1. 



UNION MEETING. 

The next session of the Skewarkey 
Union is appointed to be held Friday, 
Sat. and 5th Sunday in May, with 
Rocky Swamp church in Halifax Co., 
N. C. 

Visitors w iH be met Thursday And 
Friday, May 27 and 28, at Halifax., on 
the arrival of the Kinston train, at 11 
A. M. and at Enfield on the arrival oi 
the north bound train at 10 A. M. 

S. HASSELU 



UNION MEETING. 

The next session of the Mill Branch 
Union is to be held with the church at 
Simpson Cree.<, Saturday and 5th Sim 
day in May. 



UNION MEETING. 

The Loid willing, the Black Creek 
Union will meet with the church at 
Scoffs M. IL, Wilson County, N. C, on 
Saturday and 5th Sunday in May. 

Elder P. D. Gold was chosen to 
preach the introductory sermon, and 
Elder J.'F. Farmer to be his alternate. 

Messengers and visitors will be met 
at Lucama, N. C, Friday evening and 
Saturday morning. 

R. H. BOSWELL. 

Union Clerk. 



UNION MEETING. 

The Smithfield Union is appointed 
to be held with the church at Hannah's 
Creek, Johns! on County, N. C. on Sat- 
urday and 5th Sunday in May. 

Brethren.' sisters and specially min- 
isters are invited to attend. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



239 



Those coming by rail can get con- 
veyance by writing brother G. W. 
Johnson, or brother J. Willis Creech, 
Benson, N. C. Please state what train 
vou will come on. Get oft' at Benson. 

J. A. BATTON, 

Union Clerk. 



UNION MEETING. 

The Cedar Island Union will be 
held with the church at North River, 
Friday. Saturday and 3th Sunday in 
Mav. 

JNO. P. TINGLE. 



UNION NOTICE. 

The next session of the Staunton 
River Union will meet with the church 
at Wetherford, commencing on Friday 
before the 5th Sunday in May, includ- 
ing Saturday and 5th Sunday. 

Wetherford is 2 1-2 miles west of 
Sycamore, on Southern Railroad. 

Brethren are invited. 

Done bv order of the church. 

N. T. OAKS, Mod. 
A. C. OWEN, Clerk. 



BEAR CREEK ASSOCIATION. 

The spring session of the Bear Creek 
Primitive Baptist Association will con- 
vene with the church in the suburbs 
of the city of Albemarle, N. O, com- 
mencing on Saturday before first Sun- 
day in May, 1915. 

A cordial invitation to Baptists to 
attend. 

The Southern trains pass Albemarle 
from Salisbury and other points north 
at six p. m. daily. The Winston-Salem 
southbound passes Albemarle frjom 
Winston at 7 :30 p. m. daily, and from 
Wadesboro and other Southern points. 
The southbound train will pass Albe- 
marle at 8 :30 a. m. 

Brother W. H. Hinson, the churck 
clerk of Albemarle, N. C, R. 1, informs 



me that all these trains will be met 

and all who come will be cared for. 

This is done by the request of the 
Association. 

J. W. JONES, 
Associational Clerk. 

Marshville, N. C. 



ELDERS T. N. WALTON AND W. 
JAMISON. 

North Fork— Tuesday after the 4th 
Sunday in April. 
Camp Branch — Wednesday. 
Republican — Thursday. 
Union — Friday. 
Knob — May 1st (Saturday.) 
Senter — Sunday. 
Martinsville — Wendesday night. 

ELDER J. F. FARMER. 

Benson Thursday night April 29. 

Dunn— Friday 10 a. m. 
Coats — Friday night. 
Angier — Sat. and Sunday, May 1 and 
2. 

Oak Grove —Tuesday. 
Willow Springs — Wednesday. 



ELDER J. E. ADAMS. 

Bethany — Sat. and 4th Sunday in 
April. 

Goldsboro — Monday night, 
LaGrange — Tuesday. 
Kinston — Tuesday night and Wed- 
nesday. 

Newport — Sat. and 1st Sunday in 
May. 

Morehead City — Monday. 
Marshallburg — Tuesday and \t 
night. 

Davis Shore — Thursday and at 
night. 

Nelsons Bay — Friday evening at 4 
p. m. 

Hunting Quarter — Sat. and 2nd 
Sunday. 

Hog Island and Cedar Island week 



2fiO 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



after and Sat. and 3rd Sunday at 
Cedar Island. 

Jones Bay — Tuesday night. 

Goose Creek — Wednesday. 

Beaulah — Thursday. 

Rose Bay — Friday. 

Tiny Oak— Sat. and 4th Sunday. 

East Lake — Tuesday night and 
Wednesday. 

Kitty Hawk Banks — Sat. and 5th 
Sunday. 

Powells Point — Monday and at 
night. 

Elizabeth City — Tuesday night and 
Wednesday. 

Flatty Creek — Saturday and 1st 
Sunday in June. 

Bethlehem — Saturday and 2nd Sun- 
day in June. 

Concord — Monday and Tuesday. 



R. E. ADAMS. 

Bethsaida — Sat. and 1st Sunday in 
May. 

Primitive Zion — Monday. 
GifV-Tuesday. 

Angier — Wednesday and at night. 
Sandy Gro^e — Thursday. 
Willow Spring — Friday. 
Middle Creek— Sat. and 2nd Sun- 
day. 



MRS. ALICE WHITFIELD. 

It is with a sad heart I will try to 
write the death of this dear sister Alice 
Whitfield. I can not do her justice 
but I will do the best I can as I am re- 
quested by her dear husband to write 
this obituary for the Landmark. She 
was the daughter of James Odom and 
his wife Lucinda, and was born Jan. 
17. ISfiO and died March 7, 1915. 



She was twice married. First to J. 
II. Hunt, who was taken away from 
Ixer in a few years, leaving her with 
four small children to fight the battle 
of this world' alone, which she fought 
bravely and lived by the works of her 
own hands. One sou died about the 
age of 22. In about two years after 
losing her first husband she then mar- 
ried Geo! V. Whitfield. To this union 
were born f> children, two dying in in- 
fancy. One of them is an invalid, hav- 
ing been ;.iflicted for years, and whom 
she was always with only just a few 
hours at the time when she went to 
church or to see the sick. She sacri- 
ficed all her pleasure for him. 

She united with the Primitive Bap- 
• tirt church at the Falls of Tar River, 
the second Saturday in Jan. 1895 and 
was baptized the Sunday following 
with her dear husband and myself by 
Elder P. 1). Gold, and lived a true an ' 
faithful member as long as she livad. 
By having an invalid son she could 
not attend regular, but always filled 
her scat vnless providentially hinder- 
ed. ITer health had been bad 1 good 
while, but was confined to her bed 
about three weeks before she died. I 
did not have the pleasure of being with 
her in her last sickness tmtil she was 
near the end. T was called to her bed- 
side on Saturday morning before she 
passed away Sunday. When I went to 
her she kneAV me, grasped my hand 
and tried so hard to talk but she was 
so weak I could not understand but 
very few words and she soon fell in a 
state of unconsciousness and gradual- 
ly grew weaker until Sunday night 
when she peacefully fell asleep in 
Jesus. Al! was done for her that hus- 
band, children, good friends and doc- 
tors and nurses could do, but none 
could stay the icy hand of death. Her 
faith in Christ was strong. She had no 
confidence in the flesh. We were very 
dear friends besides being family con- 
nected and spent many pleasant hours 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



261 



together, but alas! she is gone, but I 
feel that death was a relief tocher for 
she had said she was willing to go 
whenever tht Lord's time came, was 
will jug to leave her children and hus- 
band, even her afflicted boy that she 
stayed by day and night, never letting 
him need lor anything she could pos- 
sibly do for him. She was a faithful 
wife and a loving mother and always 
felt that she had a great responsibility 
on her to try to train her children and 
I feel like the Lord has blessed her to 
raise them to be dutiful children. May 
God give them strength to bear the 
death of their dear mother and may 
they feel vhile it is a loss to them it 
is gain for her, and may they follow 
her footsteps and never forsake the 
blessed truth she believed with all her 
heart: for I feel like she has gone to 
that great beyond to reap her reward 
and fill her seat that our dear Saviour 
has prepared for her. 

The funeral services wer conducted 
by Elder P. D. Gold at her home on 
Pender street, Rocky Mount, N. C, and 
as she had long requested that beauti- 
ful hymn "0 happy day when saints 
shall meet," was sung over her body. 
Then she was quietly laid to rest at 
her old home in the family cemetery, 
brother Denson conducting the ser- 
vices at the grave where she was laid 
to await the resurrection where she 
will meet her dear ones gone before : 
and may it be God's will that the ones 
left behind may meet her on that hap- 
py shore to praise God forever and 
ever in a world that shall never end. 

In that bright eternal city, 

Death can never, never come! 

In his own good time he'll call us, 

From our toil, to home, sweet home. 

In love and sadness, 
IJATTIE A. WHITFIELD. 
Rocky Mount, N. C., R. 3, Box 60. 



W. D. II. 1UCHA1IDSON. 

The subject of this sketch was born 
in Pittsylvania County, Va., July 20, 
1838. He was raised and grew up a 
moral and upright man. 

In 1861, he enlisted in the Cival War 
and served until 1863 when he re- 
ceived a wound in the hip from which 
he never fully recovered, being un- 
able to walk straight afterwards. 

About the date 1863 he receiyed a 
hope. He labored on the farm for his 
family altnough he was unable to 
stand as other men do. He was an 
honorable man, an affectionate hus- 
band, a kind father and good neigh- 
bor. He endeavored to do unto others 
as he would have them do unto him. 

He buried his talent, not feeling it 
sufficient to go to the church until 
1912 when he was made willing with 
what little hope he had. 

After I had baptized him lie straight- 
ened up and said, thank God! thank 
God! 

He lived a good member of the Mill 
church until he died in 1914. 

He leaves a wife and three daugh- 
ters to mourn their loss, besides" his 
church and a host of friends. 

J. N. W. 




Elder J. T. Collier's 
changes from Ke*nly, N. C, R. F. D. 
Micro, N. C. 



202 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



LETTERS FROM RHEUMATICS 

Possibly you have imagined that you could 
never get your own consent to write a tes- 
timonial letter, but if you have ever experi- 
enced the excruciating pains of Rheumatism 
you can at least appreciate the feelings of 
those who have been relieved of this ter- 
rible disease by drinking the Mineral Water 
from the justly celebrated Shivar Spring at 
Shelton, S. C. This water overcomes many 
diseases, including Indigestion, Gout, Uric 
Acid Poisoning and Liver and Kidney dis- 
eases but no patrons of the Spring are more 
enthusiastic in their praise of the water 
than those who have been relieved of their 
Rheumatism. Hundreds of letters like the 
following have been received by the Man- 
agement : 

Dr. Crosby, a South Carolina physician 
writes: — "I have tested your Spring Water 
in several cases of Rheumatism, Chronic In- 
digestion, Kidney and Bladder troubles and 
in Nervous and Sick Headaches and find 
that it has acted nicely in each case, and I 
believe that if used continuously for a rea- 
sonable time will produce a permanent cure. 
It will purify, the blood, relieve debility, 
stimulate the action of the Liver, Kidneys 
and Bladder, aiding them in throwing off all 
poisonous matter." 

Dr. Avant of Savannah writes: — "I suffer- 
ed for years with a most aggravating form 
of stomach disorder, and consulted a num- 
ber of our best local physicians, went to 
Baltimore and consulted specialists there 
and still I was not benefited. I had about 
despaired of living when I began to use Shi- 
var Spring Water, and in a short time was 
cured." 

Mr. Rhodes of Virginia writes: — "Please 
send me ten gallons of Shivar Spring Water 
quickly. I want it for Rheumatism. I know 
of several who were cured of Rheumatism 
with this water." 

Editor Cunningham writes: — "The water 
has done more good than any medicine I 
have ever taken for Rheumatism. Am en- 
tirely free from pain." 

Mr. McClam of South Carolina writes: — 
"My wife has been a sufferer with Rheuma- 
tism and after drinking twenty gallons of 
your Mineral Water was entirely cured of 
the horrible disease." 

Mr. Carter of Virginia writes: — "Mrs. Car- 
ter has had enlarged joints on her hands, 
caused by Rheumatism. Shivar Spring Wa- 
ter removed every trace of the enlargement. 
The water is simply excellent." 

If you suffer with Rheumatism, or with 
any chronic disease, accept the guarantee 
offer below by signing your name. Clip 
and mail to the 
Shivar Spring, 

Box 55-R, Shelton, S. C. 

Gentlemen: — I accept your guarantee of- 



fer and enclose herewith two dollars for ten 
gallons (two five-gallon demijohns) of Shi- 
var Spring Water. I agree to give the wa- 
ter a fair trial in accordance with instruc- 
tions which you will send, and if I derive 
no benefit you are to refund the price in 
full upon receipt of the two empty demi- 
johns, which I agree to return promptly. 

Name 

Post Office 

Express Office 

Note: — The Advertising Manager of the 
Zion's Landmark is personally acquainted 
with Mr. Shivar. You run no risk what- 
ever in accepting his offer. I have person- 
ally witnessed the remarkable curative ef- 
fects of this water in a very serious case. 



THREE BOOKS OF INTEREST. 

Have You Read Them? 
Biographical History of Baptist 
Ministers 

containing nearly 1000 sketches, 381 
pictures of Ministers, Deacons and tal- 
ented Sisters, together with an Appen- 
dix of much useful information — 

Price $2.00. 
Also Theodosin Ernest, The Heroine of 
Faith, and Ten Days in Search 
of the Church 
both these books in one volume and 
contain 687 pages. No work of its size 
and cost is a better defense of Bible 
doctrine and practice, or sets the one 
church Christ built in fairer colors. 

Price $1.25. 
These books are well printed on good 
paper, substantially and neatly bound, 
and above all they are highly endorsed 
by Elders Hassell, Cash, Thompson, 
G-old, Waters, Dalton, Chick, Hurst, 
Webb, Lester, Cayce, Branscome, Nor- 
ton, Stewart, Henderson, Hanks, Dur- 
rnd, Daily, Moore, Oliphant, Lundy, 
Morris, Hardy, Raulston, Pope, Mew- 
born, Gilbert, Farmer, Denny, Elkins, 
and hundreds of other ministers and 
editors the country over. 
As long as they last both volumes will 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



be sent together for $2.75 and if you 
are not pleased with your purchase 
they may be returned in good order 
and money will oe refunded. 

Send all orders to 
R. H. PITTMAN, Luray, Va. 



EASTERN UNION. 

The Eastern Union is to be held 
with the church at Pungo, and to 
commence on Friday before the 5th 
Sunday in May. 

All lovers of truth are invited to 
attend, especially ministers. We have 
but one ordained minister. 

A. W. AMBROSE, 

Union Clerk. 



NEW ARRANGEMENT. 

We are still publishing the Old 
School Baptist Hymn and Tune Book 
both shape note and round note, 70 
cents for single copy, $6.50 a dozen, 
transportation prepaid. Send orders 
to Elder Silas H. Durand, Southamp 
k ton, Pa., or to Elder P. G. Lester 
Lloyd, Va. 



S«»d rftur Job Printing. 



§ DROPSY 
in 1;, D t R o2 T > H ^ y A s s '^GREEN, Successor to 
DR. H. H. GREENS SONS, Box H, Chatsworth, Ga. 



FOR INFORMATION. 
For information and for reference 
we would be pleased to have a Minute 
of every Primitive Baptist Association 
in America and will thank the Clerks 
of the various Associations to forward 
one to me at their earliest possible 
convenience. 

P. T). G. 



I tyEgQ BRANCH MANAGERS 

O. A. BDTLEB. 401 F«otories, TOLEDO, OHIO 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Nerves. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

CONNERSVILLE, 1ND., 
R. No. 1, Box G., 

Agents Wanted. 




TH!S IS THE AGE OF SPEED 

MEADAOiE 

NEURALGIA QUICKLY 

No need to suSfer. Just say the magic 
word "YUM" to the druggist end relief 
im yours. 

"I his wonderful preparation is bringing prompt relief io thousands of 
sufferers daily. It is guaranteed to do the same tor you. 
A 10c trial package is our best argument. You will not only be convinced 
of the merits of YUM, but you will also recommend it to suffering' friends. 
Thousands of testimonials to prove our claims. For sale by your druggist, 
or sent on the receipt of 10c. 

THE YVM DRUG COMPANY, - - Durham, f¥. C, 



264 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



We Will Dry Clean 
One Garment For You 
FREE 



i the difference be 
club work and real 
sauing. To do this 
rt, or other garuicn 



uldresson the outside, mark the pack; 
'Free Offer" and mail to us by parcel post 
We are now better equipped than e 
jefore for first-class dry cleaning, dyei 

New°$25,000 Plant 



Columbia laundry Co. , 1 07 Fayetteville St. .Greens 



Health Hints. 



Pure air is as essential to health as 
pure food and drink. 

Don't sleep in a close room. You 
poison yourself. 

Don't sleep with your nostrils cov- 
ered or your mouth open. 

If there are nasal obstructions to 
free breathing see a specialist and 
have growth removed. 

Avoid colds. The accumulations of 
phlegm interfere with your needed 
supply of fresh air. 

If you have a cold, satarrh or croup, 
use Mentholatum liberally in nostrils 
and on throat and chest. 

Mentholatum tends to open the air 
passages and clear up the membranes 
of the lungs and respiratory tract. 

This means easier breathing, great- 
er comfort and the preservation of 
health. 

Air is life. 

Mentholatum relieves inflammation 
also, and hence is much used for 
burns, bruises, chapped skin, etc. 

Send us your Printing. P. D. G. 



"Blessed Relief" 
RHEUMATISM 
Cured to Stay Cured 

My Dear Reader: — 

I am an old lady nearly 9u years 
old. My life's work among the sick 
is nearing its end. At the age of 50 
I was terribly afflicted with rheuma- 
tism; I suffered untold agony for 
nearly five years. I have been an her- 
bist, nurse and student of roots and 
herbs for nearly 70 years. I diagnosed 
and formulated a cure that cured me., 
and it never returned. I have treated 
nearly 7,500 rheumatic sufferers, some 
of the most pitiful cases imaginable; 
I effected cures in practically every 
case. I want you to read my Booklet 
on the "cause and cure" of rheuma- 
tism. It is FREE. 

Sincerely, 
LYDIA E. SMALL, 
LL Fenway Station, Boston, Mass. 



WENEEDU Book Agents. Both Sexes, 
for best seller published. Particulars 
and outfit free GEO. W. SOMERS, 
1-A, St. Augustine, Florida. 



ENTERTAINING BOOK 

I have made an arrangement for a 
very nic« Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. GOLD. 



Can: 



- Cured at the Kellam Hospital. 



The record of tha Kelam Hospital 
is without parallel in hi3tory, having 
cured 7'ithout the uce of the Knife, 
Acids, X-Ray or Radium, over ninety 
per cent, of the many hundreds of 
sufferers from Cancer which it has 
treated during the past eighteen 
years. We want every man and wom- 
an in the United States to know what 
we are doing. KELLA.M HOSPITAL, 
1617 W. Main St., Richmond, Va. 
Write for literature. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



: -PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 
AT 

^ WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Primitive or Old School Baptist 

VOL. XL VIII. WILSON, N. O, MAY I, 1915. NO. 12. 




P. D. GOLD, Editor, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Asso. Eduor, Floyd, Va. 



$1.50 PER YEAR. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 



"Ask for the eld paths where is the good way." 

By che help of the Lord this paper will contend for til* 
ancient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, and 
strengthened by its eorda of lore. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of men, 
*»d regard only the Biol* as in© standard of truth. 

It urges the people to search the scriptures, and obey 
$t&m, the King is the Holy Hill of Eton, keeping them 
selves unspotted from the world. 

It aims to oomtend for the mystery of the faith in God, 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Holy Spirit, fchfc 
blessed Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new postcfSaea. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let bin somd wha: >* due, et*<* abm 
wv&lp his p;»stoffi6t<. 

Let each subscriber lor hts paper in advan* > ii. pe»- 
shtt. and wbosf b.«t re»«ws give the same name H Las beuB 
going in, unless He wishes it ehangod, then he should state 
both the old and the new names. 

If the money seat haa net been receipted, picaae inform 
me of it. When you can always send money by moaey order 
or check, er draft, or registered letter or by express. 

Each subscriber can toil the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing the date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act fu agents 

All names and post effiees should be written plainly. 

All lovers of jjoepel truth are invited to write *©t it — -if 
a impressed. 

May grace, mercy and poace bo multiplied to all !ov*»r«= 
&f truth. 

All eommnnieations, business letters, reniitt&nees of P O. 
Orders, mofiof, drafts, etc., should be sent to 



P D. GOLD, f 7 ; i*©B, R C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



A GHKlSTiAN NATION. WHAT IS 
ITi 

Christian civilization, christian na- 
tions, Christianity a failure, arc 
purasea handled very loosely ana care- 
lessly by press, pulpit and forum in 
these days oi high enlightenment. 
What misnomers, wnat misapplication, 
what a confused medlv ot ideas does 
the sober thinker behold in these 
bandied terms! Since the war in Eur- 
ope be^an in .Inly many shallow pates 
have cried, Christianity a failure! 
Christian civilization has broken 
down 1 Christian nations are at war-' 
Such expressions are from the super- 
licial i>rain-pans of inaccurate think- 
ers. That such howlers have things 
badly mixed in their upper stories is 
very evident. These would-be teach- 
ers desirous of directing public opin- 
ion and thought know neither what 
they say nor whereof they affirm. They 
are evidently ignorant of the marked 
distim tion between Christianity and 
civilization. They are also in the dark 
as In what constitutes a christian na- 
tion. Christianity is one thing; civili- 
zation is another, and a christian na- 
tion has never existed. 

These materialistic minds consider 
that a civilized nation is a christian na- 
tion. Not by a large majority. There 
never w ill be a christian nation as long 
as the present order of things pre- 
vails. I mean a christian nation shall 



not be until the last conflagration shall 
Have swept the wood, hay and siubble 
of nioderndom into ashes, and there 
Shall have been set up a new heaven 
and a new earth, wnerein dwelleth 
righteousness. 

Boastful, hypercritical Germany, 
atheistical fiance. Catholic Belgium, 
Austria and Kussia are not christian 
nations. The highly civiiiz.ed and en- 
lightened United States of America is 
not even a christian nation. 

A christian nation! What is it If 
What does it take to make such a na- 
lion'.' That's the question to be an- 
swered. 

First, we will in Yankee fashion 
show what is not a christian nation; 
then secondly, show what manner of 
st ulT' it is made of. 

.Morality will not make a christian 
nation; education will not make a 
christian nation; commercialism will 
not make a christian nation; literature, 
inspired and uninspired, w ill not mak« 
a christian nation. In short none of 
the present modern pharaphernalia of 
arts, sciences, philosophies, discover- 
ies and inventions do not constitute a 
christian nation. 

A christian nation is a nation sepa- 
rate and apart from things earthly 
and material ; a christian nation is the 
"Holy Nation" mentioned in the 
Epistle of Peter, the Apostle of Christ ; 
a christian nation is one in complete 
harmony with the doctrine and teach- 



2H(i 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



ings of Christ as set forth in the New 
Testament or Covenant. 

This New Testament is a covenant of 
grace (unmerited favor) upon the 
basis of which eternal life, the gift of 
Cod, is without money or price, given 
to sinners. 

The New Testament was established 
by Christ after fulfilling, in its every 
jot or tittle, the iLaw or Old Testa- 
ment. 

The Old Testament contains the Ten 
Commandments or moral law and the 
promise of a coming Saviour. 4 

Under this covenant since the fall of 
man, mankind is in death, natural and 
spiritual, as a consequence of the dis- 
obedience of the one man, Adam. All 
men are, therefore, under condemna- 
tion, from then 'till now ; for all have 
sinned, and come short of the glory of 
God. Hi ere is, for this cause, no hope 
for the salvation of any one by, or in 
the keeping of the Law, or Ten Rules 
of Justice. 

The Law demands absolute perfec- 
tion, and no man or nation of men (for 
a nation is nothing more than indivi- 
duals organized) will ever measure up 
to this standard until the restitution of 
all things. That all men are guilty, de- 
praved and condemned under the Law 
covenant is a foregone conclusion. 

It is utterly impossible for any man, 
woman or child to be saved by keep- 
ing the law, notwithstanding the fact 
that the condemned and depraved con- 
dition of humanity, men, nations of 
men and denominations of men are 
going about preaching conditionalism, 
arminianism. as a sure ground and 
medium of salvation. 

Very nearly all modern sciences, arts 
and literature are shot through and 
through with the false idea that man- 
kind are saved by keeping the law or 
Ten Commandments. There isn't, how- 
ever, any truth in such a proposition. 
Blind, ignorant man is calling such 
to eking' a^riitiamity. B«w falsa, kow 



erroneous ! Such teaching is the Bandy 
foundation upon which the foolish 
build, and for this reason the hoods of 
iniquity, ranis of wars and persecutions 
and winds of vapid false doctrine 
sweep their house of sand, foundation 
and all, to destruction. 

The wood, hay and stubble of such 
unsound teaching will not stand the 
wrath of Cod which wrath has, all 
adown the Stream of Time, been re- 
vealed from heaven against the wick- 
edness and ungodliness of men. In ex- 
emplication hereof, instance the de- 
luge of water in the days of Noah, the 
sulphuric overthrow of Sodom and 
Gom'orrha, the overturning of Baby- 
lonian, Assyrian and Alexandrian em- 
pires, the terrific downfall of Jerusa- 
lem by Titus, 70 A. D. and the swil't 
and retributive destruction of Caesar. 
Charlemagne and Napoleon's realms. 

These awful cataclysms are, all of 
them, from the creation of the world, 
until now, traceable to the one cause 
of such retribution, viz, the sin and 
total depravity of man. This asser- 
tion, James clearly sustains in his apt 
question and answer: "Whence come 
wars and fightings among you'' Come 
they not hence of your lusts which war 
in the flesh, against the Spirit?" 

Thus we see that the times are, 
they have always been, out of joint. 
Men are lovers of themselves, heady, 
high minded, lovers of pleasures more 
than Cod, having a form of godliness, 
but denying the power thereof. They 
are ignorantly putting material prog- 
ress for spiritual ; they wrongly think 
that progress in the physical and phys- 
ical sciences of today, commerce, art, 
inventions modern, philosophies, false- 
ly so called. &c, is progress spiritual. 

It is true man has gone forward along 
some material lines for their natural 
betterment, hut man has not spiritually 
progressed one inch. He has rather re- 
trograted. Men are waxing worse anc 
waria, «UetiTi*g' anal kei«g' deceived 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



2«7 



as Holy Writ chalks them out to be. 

Al«n, nations and denominations are 
radically wrung at heart, and nothing 
they can do will change the matter, 
for the Leopard cannot change his 
spots nor the Ethiopian his color, if 
so, then those .accustomed to do evil 
could turn ami do good. If the foun- 
dation is wrong the superstructure is 
so also: if the root and heart of the 
tree is dead and corrupt so also are the 
branches. If man, the social root or 
tree is rotten at the core, then the 
branches in all their ramifications are 
spiritually defective. The streams are 
of the same nature as the fountain and 
as it is a physical impossibility for wa- 
ter to rise higher than its source, so it 
is by parity of reasoning, spiritually 
impossible for natural unregeuerate 
men, whether as individuals or social 
organism, to rise to heights of spiritual 
life. 

Having denned what a christian na- 
tion is not, we shall now endeavor to 
set forth what one is. We somewhat 
briefly stated above that a christian 
nation is one in full and complete 
conformity to the doctrine of God our 
Saviour. This doctrine is taught in 
the New Testament only. 

The keynote of the teaching therein 
declared is. salvation by grace through 
faith ; the gift of God, not of works, 
, lest any man should boast. Grace, 
free, unmerited favor of God as Mr. 
, Webster defines, is the one, and only, 
I foundation of the salvation of sinners, 
k This foundation was laid by the Great 
J Teacher Himself, and in fact, Christ is 

• the foundation, for no other founda- 
, Hon can man lay than is laid, which 

is Christ Jesus. Men and nations of 
l inen must be founded upon this rock. 
] or they split. In the text above quot- 

• e<l it is expressly stated that salvation 
1 is not of works, that is, it is not by 
ti keeping the law of Moses, or any other 
i law. It is not of works, then it must 

be of grace. If not of grace then of 



works. It cannot be of both. 

Works and grace are opposite sys- 
tems. Only two systems of religious 
thought are extant today, and there 
never has been but two systems. One 
of these was started in the garden east- 
ward in Eden by his Satanic majesty; 
the other was originated in the mind 
and heart of God before the world be- 
gan. 

All nations and denominations of 
earth today are founded upon the sys- 
tem of works, which system we have 
before proven to be the baseless fabric 
of a vision, and that a false vision. 

Tin- system of salvation by grace is 
the NeAv Testament foundation, and 
therefore, the only right foundation 
for the salvation of any sinner. All 
enlightened christian experience, 
science and history prove this great 
fact conclusively. 

The system of salvation by grace is 
distinct, separate, apart from the sys- 
tem of salvation by works. Indeed 
they are as far apart as the East is 
from the West and cannot be mixed 
any more than oil and water. 

The system of grace is an organism, 
a complete whole. Tt is comprehen- 

A system, a whole, includes all the 
parts. The parts, fundamental prin- 
ciples or truths must be harmoniously 
joined together according to their af- 
finities. Thus we have a perfect sys- 
tem. Such a system is the system of 
salvation by grace. It is a perfect, 
complete, spiritual system of truth; it 
is the hidden wisdom, explained, to the 
saints, by the apostle to the Gentiles. 
This system is incarnate in Christ 
Jesus. He is the Author and Finisher 
of it, the living, beating, throbbing em- 
bodiment thereof. Tf any man be in 
Christ, he is in this organism, kingdom, 
holy environment. 

This organism, partitively consider- 
ed, embraces: firstly, spiritual knowl- 
edge ; secondly, spiritual holiness : 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



thirdly, spiritual righteousness. This 
threefold doctrine tills the intellectual, 
emotional^ and volitional man born of 
God) This new organism is thus seen 
to be unity in trinity, like its Author, 
the three one Uod. 

The first branch of this three-one- 
doctrine, spiritual knowledge, includes 
the following basic principles or 
truths; I. Sovereign, eternal, and 
personal election or choice of a certain 
number of sinful, guilty, depraved men 
out of fallen humanity, to everlasting 
life. 2. Particular special redemption 
of this chosen number by the blood 
shedding of the Son of God. 3. Sov- 
ereign, effectual and irresistable re- 
generation of this same company 
the Almighty operation of this same 
company by the Almighty operation 
of the Holy Spirit, 4. The sanctifica- 
tion of all these chosen, blood bought, 
regenerate people in spirit. 5. Ulti- 
mately, the complete sanctification or 
glorification of all the elect family of 
Ood both in body and in soul. 

The second branch of this triune 
teaching or science, spiritual holiness, 
involves the following emotional ele- 
ments, or holv aspirations: Emotions, 
desires, affections of the new creature: 
such as holy desires for divine knowl- 
edge; esteem, society, riches aiv"l - 
or; supreme love of God. and hatred 
of all things contrary to His "Divine na- 
ture: and a volitional nature, or wil 1 
which chooses the ricrht ends and 
means of christian conduct. 

The third department of this three 
fold cord of truth, new testament 
righteousness, are the outward prints, 
actions of the herein described holy 
nature. The external manifestations 
of this divine nature are spiritual wor- 
ship of and reverence for God the 
Father, Son and Holy Ghost, sweet 
submission to His good and perfect 
will; and steadfast and unmovable 
abounding in the works of the Lord, 
for as much as these peculiar people 



know that their labor in the Lord 
shall not be in vain. In fine this branch 
of gospel truth is succinctly set forth 
by Solomon, the wise man, in this brief 
verse: "Let us hear the conclusion of 
the whole matter, Fear Uod and keep 
His commandments, for this is the 
whole of man." 

Mr. Peabody in his moral philoso- 
phy, sums it up in what he calls the 
four cardinal virtues, namely: 1. Pru- 
dence, or duties to ourself. 2. Hon- 
esty, or duties to our fellow beings. A. 
Fortitude, or duties in regard to things 
unavoidable. 4. Order, or duties in re- 
spect to things over which we have 
control. Mr. Peabody makes these 
virtues the basis and means of salva- 
tion. In this he is grossly in error. 
Hence his beautiful system of ethics is 
only a rope or sand. Mr. Peabody has 
the cart before the horse, the effect be- 
fore the cause. 

When an individual, a nation (a na- 
tion is only a community of individ- 
uals) possesses these qualities, it will 
be something akin to a christian na- 
tion. When such things exist then we 
can boast of christian nations, christian 
civilization &c, and not until then. 

When this condition of things shall 
have come to pass, nations will learn 
wars no more, the lion and lamb will 
lie down together, the bear and cow ; 
and nations will have beat their swords 
into plow shares and their spears into 
pruning hooks. 

JOHN A. SHAW. 
Elizabeth City, N. 0. 



COMMUNICATION. 
My Dear Brother Gold: — I have had 
a mind to write a piece for your paper 
for some time. T sent you a short note 
with my remittance thinking that 
would do, but I still have a mind to 
write and what seems strange I have 
no special message, but would love to 
extol the name of our Lord and Sav- 
iour, 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



I sometimes look back to the time 
when I could say "bless the Lord Oh 
my soul, and all that is within me 
bless His Holy name." But I can't 
feel as in times past and this makes me 
sometimes feel that surely the Lord 
has clean gone forever. It is SAvcet 
when 1 can look back at the time when 
1 could feel His presence and hear that 
still small voice speaking peace to my 
soul which seemed to say: 

•'The Lord has promised good to me, 
His word my hope secures, 
He will my shl-V.i and portio i be, 
As long as life endures. 

Lei cares lik^ • Wil® dehlge com', 
And stems o? sorc-w fall; 
May I out safe roadi my h-voio, 
My God. my hasrten, my all 

It will soon be thirty years since 
passing these ha-),!/ seasons u d I am 
still feeling that the Lord is good and 
merciful to mo. !Jnt ! to bo cn- 
grateful, verv Car of! and my wi-akness 
more and more, and I feel that in me 
there is nothing good. 

1 once thought and hoped to grow in 
grace bid I seem to grow from grace. 
Bui I am still hoping that the Egyptian 
host was drowned in the Red Sea where 
they can rise up against me no more. 

Oh if 1 could once more feel as well 
as say, "Thy will. Oh Lord, be done," 
it would be such sweet assurance to 
me. "All things work together for* 
good to them who love the Lord, who 
arc the called according to His pur- 
pose." whether wis can see it or not; 
but I do v- ••* to be more thankful for 
the many blessings he bestows on me, 
and praise the name that calms my 
fears and bids my sorrows cease. 

My eirmmstances are such that I 
don't get out among the Baptists much 
but it is a great plasure and comfort 
to me to meet the dear brethren and 
sisters at places of worship. They are 



2R9 

the only people with whom i want to 
make my home as long as 1 live in this 
life and they are 1 believe the church 
of the true and living God. If 1 was as 
satisfied about myself as i am about 
His church 1 think there would be 
fulness that would satify the who.e 
soul. There is nothing here that can 
satisfy. 

With love to all the brethren and 
sisters, from one that feels unworthy, 
MRS. S. A. TRAVIS. 

Danville, Va. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Deai- Brother Cold:— The blessed 
Lard has enabled me to be so I can be 
up and around in my room, for which 
I am thankful. It is planned that I 
should go to the hospital today or to- 
morrow and thanks be to God above 1 
feel perfectly resigned and willing Hint 
ITis will should be done in all things. I 
know it is all in His hands whether I 
live or whether T die and why should 
we lament our troubles here when we 
have a hope of such a sweet promise 
beyond the grave. 

Chris: said. "Tn the world you shall 
have tribulations, but in me peace." 
And what a blessed thing it is when 
we can feel that peace and calm, be- 
cause our God is at the helm, that 
"His purposes will ripen fast, unfold- 
ing every hour: the bud may have a 
bitter taste, but sweet will be the 
flower." 

Brolher Gold when it is so that T 
can go back to my experience — when 
T went down in death as it were— and 
feel that it was the Lord that brought 
me out and gave me the hope that I 
am now resting on, then it is when 1 
feel that T ..have a hope and have al- 
ready passed through the worst death 
T shall ever know. 

Brother Cold T felt that surely the 
Lord had sent his ministering angels 
to comfort me for T have been almost 



270 



ZTGN'S LANDMARK. 



Starving to near preaching for some 

time and surely t h o Lord has blessed 

Last week I was so east down and 
so low down in spirit that I felt the 
Lord had forsaken me or had never 
known me. 1 can't tell just how 1 felt, 
bu1 for a few da\s it seemed I was 
shut up in darkness. Then the light 
came forth and 1 wanted to see some 
of God's little ones. So when on Sat- 
urday evening Brother Denson stopped 
by to see how 1 was 1 told him, al- 
though feeling too little to say it. that 
I felt like the Lord had sent him. 1 
asked him to stay with us as I wanted 
to hear him talk and wauted to hear 
some singing. "Well he started to go 
home but it seemed he bad a mind to 
come back and Ob what a comfort it 
was to mei — a building up. a strength- 
ening, a help in time of need. 

Then a pain while Brother Denson 
was here they found 1 had been desir- 
ing to bear Brother Boswell preach. 
So they let him know it and he came 
last night and the Lord blessed me to 
sit at the brethren and sisters' feet 
while be banded out each one his por- 
tion as the Lord gave it to him for us. 

Brother Hold 1 can never tell you 
how little T felt or how much good it 
lias done me. But you already know, 
for there is that which we can never 
tell, but like the disciples said, "did 
not our hearts burn within us," sure- 
ly now we know it is Christ Jesus our 
Lord. 

Brother Gold T have written more 
than 1 intended but Avbile T cannot do 
anything more than sit around my 
mind is taken up with the things of 
Christ and His goodness to poor fallen 
man. 

"Fading is the worldling's pleasure. 
All his boasted pomp and show; 
Solid joys and lasting treasure. 
None but Zion's children know." 

Brother Gold please excuse my 



blundering* and mistakes for tkej are 
many but such as 1 have give 1 thee. 
Your little sister, 
MARY E. GARDNER. 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



ENCOURAGING. 

Dear Brother Gold:— 1 feel burdened 
and want to say something about what 
1 feel, or at least try to tell. 1 know 
that darkness lias covered the earth, 
and gross darkness the people, but 
there are yet a few (.compared to the 
multitude,) who are watching, waiting, 
hoping, trusting and praying to the 
living God. who hears their sighs, 
moans and groans, and sees their tears, 
bye and bye, when the man in linen 
with the writer's inkhorn by his side 
passes through and marks them. Oh! 
what terror to the rest. 

Then cheer up children of the living 
God. What if we do suffer here in 
this world, is not this the greatest of 
all promises. "These are they which 
have come up out of great tribulation 
—have washed their robes, and made 
them white in the blood of the Lamb." 

This means we must suffer here. 
Our flesh hates to suffer, but Jesus the 
Captain of our salvation was made per- 
fect through suffering. We must have 
sorrows, and if not one kind it must be 
another and so on. My greatest sor- 
row is 1 can't live like I think a chris- 
tian ought to live. I try to watch and 
pray and then nearly always find my- 
self out of the way. So "When T count 
up all the cost, if not free grace T know 
I'm lost, so my hope is fixed on nothing 
less than Jesus a.nd His righteousness." 
For 

"When T survey the wondrous cross 
On which the Mighty Maker died, 
My richest gain T count but dross 
And pour contempt on all my pride." 
Affectionately, 
BETTIE Z. WHITLEY. 
Washington, N. C. 



DION'S LANDMARK. 



WHAT 18 MAN ? 

•"Ought not Christ to have suffered 
these things, and to enter into His 
glory?" Luke 24:26. 

Oh, what a solemn question! Who of 
us, can answer it in the affirmative'/ 
And, especially, when we consider the 
greatness of Him who asked this ques- 
tion, do we not shrink? Brother sin- 
ner, do you feel in yourself that you 
have any claim on the most high God, 
that His pure, spotless Son should have 
suffered and died for you? Perhaps 
you will say yes. if we keep His laws 
as commanded. Well, have you done 
it '.' Has any man ever, save Jesus Him- 
self; kept the holy law of Clod, or can 
any man, afflicted with sin as we are 
in nature, having only a carnal mind, 
which is enmity against God, keep the 
holy law of a holy God? How could a 
being that is unholy perform a holy 
act of any kind, or even entertain a 
holy thought? Impossible! 

[sa. 48.18, "Oh that thou hadst 
barkened to my commandments! Then 
had thy peace been as a river, and thy 
righteousness as the waves of the sea." 
10th verse: "Thy seed also had been 
■a% the sand, and the offspring of thy 
bowels like the gravel thereof, etc." 
Hut no! Stocks and stones were so 
much more convenient; gods made 
with their own hands of gold, silver 
and wood until these were all condemn- 
ed irretrievably, when, by the cunning 
craftiness of the devil, it was discov- 
ered that International Sunday School 
Religion would completely fill the 
place of all of them. Yea. and we are 
condemned for raising .our voice 
against such man extolling and God 
dishonoring devices of the devil. But, 
anything for the world rather than 
give glory to God. 

Let us go back a little and see who 
man is. in his fallen sinful nature., 
kfaa, and all that Ood made was made 
Maa siaae« aa« fell iata shame. 



condemnation and death, and, it was 
only by Uod's grace thai He was suf- 
fered to ever again draw the breath of 
life, or see the beauties oi nature, 
smell or taste any tiling good, hear tne 
voice, or feel the presence of Ood. 
.Notice what some oi the divine writ- 
ers say of such a wonderful demon- 
stration of God's love to fallen man in 
effecting his salvation from such a 
state of sin and death. Job 17:14 
says : 

"1 have said to corruption, thou 
art my father, to the worm, thou art 
my mother, and my sister." 

David says, Ps. 22:L>, " J am a worm 
and no man." lsa. 1:6, he says: 
'"From the sole of the foot even unto 
the head there is no soundness in it; 
but wounds and bruises and putrify- 
ing sores," etc., and in 5:6 he says, "1 
am a man of unclean lips, and dwell 
in the midst of a people of unclean 
lips," fce. Eliphas says. Job 15:14-16 
inclusive, "What is man that be should 
be clean? and he which is horn bf a 
woman, that he should he righteous? 
Behold, he putteth no trust in his 
saints; yea, the heavens are not clean 
in his sight. How much more abomi- 
nable and filthy is man, which drink 
eth iniquity like water?" Ps. 15:13, 
'•They are all gone aside, they are al- 
together become filthy; there is none 
that doeth good, no, not one. 

Brethren, do we not know by ex- 
perience, that these Scriptures are 
justly applicable to us? Then, how can 
we lay any just claim of our own on 
His mercies and say that He ought to 
have suffered these things for us? In- 
ternational Sunday School religion 
may teach its devotees that if they con- 
form to certain requirements that God 
is under obligations to hear their cries 
in all things. 1 fee] very confident in 
saying, that if God ever intended that 
the plan of salvation should be 
changed from grace to modern Interna- 
tiaaal Sunday ttrkaal rtligia*, that it 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



would have been mentioned some- tion that any of them can come to 

where in the Book, lie ye not de- Jesus, right now and be saved. Jesus 

ceivedj liod lias not changed ltis eter- says, John b' :37 : "All that the Father 

nal plan. "By grace are ye saved giveth me shall come to are; aud him 

through faith, and that not of your- that cometh to me, I will in no wise 

selves, it is the gift of Cod, not of cast out." 39th verse reads thus : "And 

works lest any man should boast." 2 this is the Father's will which hath 

Sam. 1:21 we read: "For thy word's .sent me, that of all which he hath 

sake, and according to thine own given me 1 should lose nothing, but 

heart, hast thou done all these great should raise it up again at the last 

things, to make thy servant know day." In the 44th verse He says • " No 

them." Isa. -13:25 we also read: "I, man can come to me except the Father 

even 1, am lie that blotteth out thy which hath sent me, draw him," and 

transgressions for mine own sake, and in another place, "Excepc it were- 

will nol remember thy sins." Isa. -18:9, given him of my Father.' What a 

"For my name's sake w ill 1 defer mine contrast between Him and the m • leru 

anger, and for my praise w ill 1 refrain Evangelist. Now, her salvation bejmg 

for thee, thai 1 cut thee not off." And the crowning point of ills g?orioas 

11th verse: "For mine own sake, even work, and the thing He came to (to. 

lor nunc own sake, will 1 do it; for w ill He not do iVl 

how should my name be polluted.' and What was the glory that behooved 
1 will not give my glory to another." Christ to suffer and enter into.' Was 
Now, back to Luke 24:45: -'Then, open- not Adam a very prominent type of 
ed He their understanding, that they Christ? Adam was not deceived when 
mighl understand the Scriptures," and he plunged himself and his posterity 
46th verse: "Thus it is written and into sin and death for the glory of 
thus it behooved Christ to suffer," etc. having his bride with him. Neither 
We find throughout the Book, that was Christ, when He said, "Here am 
the husband and wife are one. So, also T, send me." He had counted the cost 
is Christ and His church one. This be- and knew full well it meant death on 
in- ti n,., and most surely it is, and, the cross with all its attendant horrors 
this road through suffering being the and sufferings. He knew also, that the 
only one h ading into His glory, and same world that persecuted Him to 
surely i< was, it behooved Him, as He the death, would persecute His bride, 
said, to suffer these things and enter He knew that it would be her delight, 
into His glorv. It is an unmistakable spiritually, to follow Him through 
fact, that through the sufferings of good and through evil report, regard- 
Christ, He entered into His glory. And less of the consequent persecution 
it is also a fact, that these sufferings awaiting her. But, that being the on- 
arArp fnr her who was created for His ly road leading into His glory. He 
ah took it. Blessed be the name of the 



apter 
md 



nd der consideration, we find 



tot back ; bring my 



created him for my glory," etc. r lhe 
Evangelist of today tells hi* cougrega- 



elieve all that the 
." Then the text, 
to have suffered 
enter into His 
lla says, "And 



Z JON'S LANDMARK. 



273 



beginning at Moses and all the prop- 
nets, lie expounded tuuo uieni m an 
the i&crlpiures, the timigs cuncernmg 
Himself. 

fefeuireu, ax tiie ministry, especially, 
have you ever tnougat about wiiac a 
sermon tliat must nave been.' And only 
io hearers pivsem / Lto not be dis- 
couraged fcjider, because you have but 
tew hearers, if you cannot preach 
Such a sermon as this, declare ihe 
win. it- < ouh'sel of Hod and be therewith 
eontviil; that is, what Uod counsels 
yon to preach, that preach and nothing 
more. 

Brethren, it seems to me, that away 
down, deep in thy soul, 1 can almost 
hear my blessed Saviour as lie begin;;, 
firsl of all, away back in the garden 
of Bden, v!: u man bad just fallen, 
v. herein lie says, "'I'll" seed of the wo- 
t&kb shall bruise the sefpent's aeac. 
ami lilt. n (addressing the serpenl 
shall bmisa iiis heel." And, did }iot 
their hearts burn within them as lie 
talked to them by the way, and while 
iiriptur 



do 



heat 



bi 



within us when it is His blessed pleas- 
ure to open to ns even one scripture, 
causing ns to get a glimpse of Him 
within .he sail. even though it be 
through a glass darkly.' Prom our sin- 
ful viewpoint we cannot say that 
Christ should have died for us, but, if 
ihe scriptures were opened to our per- 
iiti understandings 1 am persuaded 
that we would have to answer the 
■'• ; fi irniative ') thai men 
aise ihe Lord for His feonder- 
3 and loving kindness to the 



te 



Children of men. 

Now. what does this text, in its com- 
plete fulfillment, as we have it. mean 
to us. Iiis people.' Does it not mean 
that we have such a High Tries! who 
lias Kuffi red and died for us, gone 
down into tin- grave and mse a mighty 
conqueror over death and hell for us, 
and has ascended to heaven, there in 



the presence of His l ather, to make 
liuetxessions for us.' lias lie not maii- 
it'esti d and vouched safe tltis salvation 
io us by sending fits Spirit into our 
hearts.' Having done all tins, yea, and 
more also, for us, should we not be 
willing to show forth His praise in 

burely, He having demonstrated such 



His lo 



but 



do 



cannot help lov 
lo.e .lis, we lov 
yew ( o unto the 

si :; : M also reign wiili Him."' Brethren, 
if v, e have i hrisi. we ha ve all things 
re !>■• think I. .i for, 3ji : to praise His 
h< Ly name ior, and we will he with 
Him, where He is, rejoicing and be- 
iiOlding His glory and will hear that, 
ali tiiuinphant expression recorded in 

Psalms 24:7. '-Lift up your heads, 0 

ye gates; and be ye lifted up. ye ever- 
Las iug doors, and the King of glo. 
shall come in." 

tii.it ill Hod's children wiil be there. 
JcsiW, the Lord Himself, said, that 
"All the father giveth me shall come 
to me and him that cometh I will in no 
wise east out. - ' Is it not His meal and 



He 



aid 



tin 



ion, when entering fully in- 
to His glory, as He will do. to say to 
the everlasting Father, in the presence 
of all the heavenly host, as it is written 
of Him. "Here am I an 1 Ihe < hddren 
thou hast given me." 

Humbly submitted, in hone of being 
one of that glorious number. 

J. HALE. 



Send us yonr printing. Work done 
neatly and promptly. P. D. G. 



274 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



■Remove not the 


ancient landmark 


which thy fathers have set." 


P. D. GOLD 


Wilson, N. C. 


P. G. LESTER, 


Floyd, Va. 


VOL. XLVIJl. 


NUMBER 12 


Entered at the post< 


)ffice at Wilson as 


second clas 


;s matter. 


WILSON,' N. C, 


MAY 1, 1915. 



EDITORIAL 



DYING, VET LIVING. 

1 am thinking of how the dying of 
l lie Lord Jesus is borne about in ones 
body. Jt' that is true of me, how is it? 
and if it is true of me as it was of Paul 
1 must and do know the truth of it, 
whether 1 know the bow of it or not. 
If 1 am sure 1 know the how of it, then 
am 1 sure that 1 know the truth of it. 
1 may know the truth of a divine 
principle, it seems to me, and yet not 
know that I do know it, because ! 
not know how that principle of divine 
truth is known. It is sometimes said 
that, when a physician is not sure as 
to what disease one died of, he simply 
passes over all preliminaries and puts 
it down "heart failure," which is 
about equivolent to saying, he died 
because lie ceased to live. Strictly 
•peaking heart failure is never, nor 
can it be the cause of death. It is as 
impossible as is perpetual motion. To 
make an intelligent diagnosis of a dy- 
ing condition one must determine and 
set forth the cause which hs* led up to 
a ad i affecting' a etaaatioia of tk« 



heart's action in that dissolution which 
we can cteaui. j.n uus oymg mat ium 
bore about in ins bouy no icamea in 
nimseii a coniinaui delivering uniu 
death. He lelt a taking hold upon 
him which seemed to iasien as thongs 
within his inward parts, and winch 
bound him and crucified him uuto uie 
world even as he ieit that ihe Vforiu 
was erueined uuto him. but this is not 
i aui's dying that is thus affecting him. 
lie is already dead — dead to the law 
by tiie bod}' of Christ, that lie might 
live unto God. It is the dying of the 
Lord Jesus that is affecting him. it is 
in this dying that he lives unto God. 
lie says, i am crucified with Christ, 
nevertheless 1 live, yet not 1. but Christ 
liveth m me. The actual, effective, 
abiding, enduring life of Paul was 
Christ. Christ lived for him, in him, 
and lived him, so that the life which 
he lived in the rlesh he lived by the 
faith of Christ, even as he lived be- 
cause Christ lived. But what was the 
character of the life which Christ 
lived in Paul.' What was the life of 
Christ? He came to offer himself as 
the one great, effectual and final offer- 
ing to God for the sins of his people. In 
his great work of fulfilling the law he 
Idled ui) the measure of all the sacri- 
fices and offerings which went before 
him under the law. In his life he lived 
the life and died the death of all the 
offerings under the law. They all 
lived and died in him, even as he lived 
and died in them. Thus in his life ht 
was continually being delivered unto 
death. Now as he lives in his people 
these things are being fulfilled in them 
by his dying and living in them. 

But what was the disease of which 
Christ died'.' It was sin with all the 
complications possible to be effected by 
it. lie died for. or because of bur sins. 
Tn revealing in us his death, these 
things which made it ne'eef-sary a'nj 
tlit-retey »ff*«tad it art »l*o itrtaltd * 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



us. As th« law in all of its phases was 
fulfilled in and by Christ, even so is its 
Fulfillment revealed in us by hnn. and 
as he suffered in this fulfillment even 
so do we suffer in the revelation of it 
in us. Tt is just as necessary tha 
should know from what we are saved 
as it is thai we should know to what wo 
are saved. We must know of the 
pangs of hell as well as of the joys of 
heaven, and it is in the revelation of 
the dying and living of Christ in us 
that we learn these things. Is this 
truly how Paid was made to suffer in 
bearing about in his body the dying of 
the Lord Jesus? In my rather dis- 
jointed manner of expression of it this 
is the how of it. in the sense presented, 
but there seems to be a sense of a far- 
ther inward character to which 1 
would like to attain. Tt seems to me 
that this dying is made most snsible in 
the mental faculties, in the inward 
parts of the mind, even that mind with 
which the law of God is served. That 
mind in the spirit of which is revealed 
the deep things of fiod. Tn this mind 
Paul was made to cry out. O wretched 
man that T am. who shall deliver me 
from the body of this death ? This is 
not as much as to say. who shall de- 
liver me from this dead hodv. Tt was 
not a dead body lashed to his back, but 
it was a body of death, in his body, the 
judicial and executive power, author- 
ity and virtue, of the law under which 
Christ was made, and which he came 
to fulfill, of which Paul says. "For 
we know that the law is spiritual: but 
T am carnal, sold under sin. The suf- 
ferings of Paid were spiritual, in which 
he must feel in himself and for him- 
self the power of the law, because of 
sin. which crucified the Lord, and held 
him under the dominion of death until 
it was vindicated, justice was satisfied 
mercy was exemplified and truth was 
verified, until eternal redemption was 
obtained, and, everlasting righteousness 



was brought in, until ih« glorious 

dawning of the blessed clay ol which 
it was said, Thou art my beloved Son, 
this day have 1 begotten thee," unto 
the bursting forth of the resurrection 
of the dead as an eternal certainty — 
until the dead, even Jesus was raised 
up, when the morning stars were heard 
to sing together, and the sons of God 
to shout for joy. Graciou;; revelations 
- blessed knowledge ! 

In this way and manner Paul was 
given, in the revelation of salvation, 
the knowledge of the things of the 
Mesh and the things of the spirit 
their respective affects and effects. 
Be must have the knowledge of thesn 
things in himself. The cause of i 
troubles together with all of its con- 
sequences is in him, and he must know 
it. Redemption and salvation must 
come to him, and tnusl be found in 
him, and must save him. 

There remains yet at least one other 
point of consideration in this matter, 
and that is, is it thus with me. Am 1 
in accord, in character and kind, with 
Paul in these things? T am settled in 
belief that these things are true of the 
children of God. and am persuaded in 
a <rood hope that they are true of me. 
They seem to be suitable to and agree- 
able with my convictions of divine 
truth, and of what I esteem as an ex- 
perience in them, and yet they are so 
utterly conlrary to all natural reason- 
ing, and so inconsistant with all nat- 
ural persuasion of which T seem to be 
the most of the time principally pos- 
sessed. T find myself unable to turn 
them to account, and say. as T would 
like to say, that for these reasons T am 
a child of God. 

I believe the children of Cod as 
taught of him are just what he would 
have them be. and the exercise into 
which he hriners them in the conscious 
n ess of their condition is such as work* 
for their continued learning and good. 



278 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



But they are not continuously recon- 
ciled to their condition, aud woidd 
haw it some how otherwise if they 
could. They would uot, aud do not 
seek the fellowship of the saints plead- 
ing these things, and yet it seems to be 
the only certain way by which it is ob- 
tained. 1 feel assured some how or 
other that this is a condition peculiar 
to itself and to the children of God. but 
is it so to me? I often fear it is not. 
and yet it is the only one of its kind 
and character which has ever affected 
me. as I have tried to describe. It is 
true the brethren hold me in fellow- 
ship, because they have these things in 
themselves, not I dare say because 
they are as bad as I am. but because 
after all they do not perceive that it is 
altogether with me as bad as T claim, 
and yet if I shoidd modify my conten- 
tion and admit that T am better than 
T profess to be. T should at once lose 
out. simply because they coxild not be- 
lieve me to be as good as T might 
claim to be. 

P. G. L. 



"Ho Shall See Of The Travail of His 
Soul and Shall Be Satisfied." Tsah. 
r>.?:ll. 

Do you know of a fuller uttcranee. a 
more eomolete settin? forth of the 
dh"ine mvstery of redemption from ^in 
and death, and a rVarer prophecv of 
thf propitiation for sin than the death of 
the Lamb of God. for the transgression 
of the people for whom Jesus crave 
himself? The entire chapter is filled 
with the humiliation and suffering of 
this holy one set forth as stricken for 
the transgression of the Lord's people, 
and his final, complete satisfaction as 
he sees the travail of his soul. 

The coming of Jesus in the flesh is 
the most surprising condescension. For 
a diomitary to leave his own glory 
and estate, his home and associations so 
pleasant, and pass by. go below the na- 



ture of angels, whose pleasure was to 
worship him, to come down lower and 
still lower in the form of a servant, lay- 
ing asitit- his glory, and be found in 
fashion as a man. so marred in form, 
making himself of no reputation in the 
most lowly form of a servant, in order 
to become the servant of his people, 
who did not know him. nor appreciate 
him, but rejected him considering that 
lie was stricken, afflicted of God, and 
despised and rejected of men: yet it 
pleased the Lord to bruise him. He 
was a man of sorrows and acquainted 
with grief. For the transgression of 
God*s people was he stricken. All we 
''the people of God^i like sheep have 
cone astray, every one turning his own 
way. each one doinir what his defiled 
nature desires walking in the light of 
his own eves, and the Lord had laid on 
him the iniquity of us all. Tt pleased 
the T ord to bruise him. 

"Who is this that cometh up from 
Edom. with dved ""->rm 0 nts from B07- 
mh 0 T that sneak in righteousness, 
mieht-" to save. Wherefore is thine 
ar>narel rpd. thv nmrmpntf! tike him 
that +rpadeth in the ""inefnt? Jesus 
trod Tvineprecs plorip. Of fV neo- 
■ptp tt'wo TT- a s none vnth 1-nrn Ml >iis 
raiment Tras s+ninpr 1 The Lord God 
laid on him the ininnitv of nil h's peo- 
ple. Hod made liim trhn knew no sin 
to he sin for us. The chastisement of 
our peace was upon him. and with his 
stripes were we healed. 

Who is this that cometh up from 
Edom 1 He is fho mighty Hod. the 
pverla=+ ; no» Father, the Princp of 
Peace. Yone so ereat in crlory. yet how 
humh^d and abased. He gnvp himself 
a random for all. 

"What has man done to advanep this 
salvation' Hp has donp the sinninrr. 
and is not -rro^thv of +ho Ipast of all 
CnrT~ mercies. Whv should we sppk 
+o divide +he nriorv of rpd em r>t ion with 
him? TVhv should man so dishonor 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



277 



t Lie Lord as to present him as a suppli- 
ant begging for our favor.' Arc there 
terms of salvation that we accept or 
reject, and thus the sinner decides the 
matter of salvation? No. Except we 
are humbled as a little child we can- 
not enler the kingdom of Cod. As a 
leggar we seek the kingdom of 
heaven. 

Ail that the rather gives to Jesus 
shall come to him, and no others can 
come to him. There is no power of the 
enemy that can prevent the salvation 
i f every one for whom Jesus died. He 
is the Lord of lord's and the King of 
kings, lie exalted at, the right hand 
of Cod a prince and a saviour. He is 
worthy. He has redeemed his people 
|rom all iniquity. There is no condition 
' o he complied with by the sinner. Sal- 
vation is by the grace of God. and is 
freely given us of God. It shall be 
given to them for whom it is prepared. 
So great is the glory and fulness of the 
Lord Jesus that heaven withholds no 
honor from him, but bestows all glory 
on hint. 

He shall see of the travail of his soul 
and shall be satisfied. In all their af- 
fliction he was afflicted, and in his 
love and pity he redeemed them, and 
carried them all the days of old. 

They are quickened with Christ in 
his resurrection, because he died for 
I hem. was delivered for their of- 
fences, and was raised for their justi- 
fication, lie is the good shepherd 
that laid down his life for the sheep, 
and all his Lather gave to ii m shall 
come to him. and hfm ihat cometh to 
him he will in no wise east out. 

The ground and cr.use of their salva- 
tion is his dying for them, redeeming 
them from all iniquity, and rising 
again for their justification. By him 
all that believe are justified from all 
things from which they could not be 
justified by the law of Closes. 

It is not left to the poor, blinded. 



perverse will of the creature to decide 
the salvation of the sinner for whom 
Jesus died. The Lord makes his people 
Wiling in i he day of his power. All 
power in heaven and earth is delivered 
into the hand of Jesus, and power is 
g^en unto him over all iiesh that he 
should give eternal life to as many as 
Hie Father has given him; and this is 
, (etna i life to know thee the only true 
».od. and Jesus Christ whom God has 
s.ni. Every one that confesseth that 
Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is 
horn of God. If when we were mem 
ies we w>( reconciled to God by the 
death of his Son, how much rather 
shall noi Ave he saved by his life. Jesus 
died and rose again according to the 
DWrpose of his Lather, and saved all 
for whom he died by the one offering 
■ '' I imself once. He hath perfected 
To cv. >- them' that are sanctified hy the 
offering of himself once. The 
i ••• uhing of the gospel is to manifest 
I Lis. The Lord God has commanded 
thai ' -us should be a light of the 
i'< . that he should be for salva- 
tion to the ends of the earth. And 
when Lie Gentiles heard this they were 
•• ; ad, ; nd glorified the word of the 
Lord ; and as many as were ordained 
h m i! life believed. Acts 13:47-48. 

Reaching the gospel is not to add 
; iy T : :;it were not chosen to salvation 
according to Cod's foreknowledge, but 
to make manifest that when any be- 
lieve in the Lord Jesus it is proof that 
1l:<>y are already saved. 

Reaching the gospel then is a wit- 
ness perfecting believers, granting 
L; . v increased knowledge of the Lord, 
and furnishing :hom unto all good 
works. 

P. D. G. 



r$T>GING TI1L FUTURE BY THE 
PAST. 

The above statement is the substance 



Tit 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



of an utterance of Patrick Homy, a 
famous orator whose patriotism was 
remarkable. Human learning and its 
ignorance have no better guides than 
this, it is said that experience teaches 
a dear school, but that fools will learn 
iu no other school. We have no perfect 
method of foretelling events. The wis- 
dom of Solomon lias said, we know not 
what a day will bring forth, therefore 
we should not boast of to-morrow, for 
it is not ours. What should be done 
today should not be deferred until to- 
morrow, since to-morrow does not be- 
long to us. The gift of prophecy is not 
given to natural men. The ignorance 
is all with the creature. But with 
Him who declares the end from the 
beginning there is in that sense no fu- 
ture. 

In our observation of events as they 
develop we learn by what we call ex- 
perience. This is of profit to those 
■who learn obedience by what they suf- 
fer. The blunders and miscarriages of 
mortals leave a painful remembrance 
of their blunders and of their blind- 
ness. History is the aggregation of in- 
dividual blunders. When these are 
narrated, and their relationship to 
each other is seen and considered it 
constitutes the history of mankind. 
Facts, events, occurences are testified 
to by eye witnesses, and these events 
published in language that is inscribed 
in books becomes historical. Among 
the most famous and the only perfectly 
reliable of these chronicles is the 
Bible that declares man's doings from 
his earliest existence. 

This biography of man is not alto- 
gether pleasing, since it relates so 
many of his doings that do not pro- 
claim his goodness nor his wisdom. 

The origin of man asserts an honor- 
able existence in his beginning. But 
quickly an intruder marred the condi- 
tion of the man and his prospects. He 
is driven out of the pleasant garden of 



Eden, and leaves its beauty and inno- 
cence, its freedom from pests and 
death, pain and fear, and is plunged 
into the confusion and vexation of sor- 
rows before unknown, to be terminated 
in the shades and corruption of death. 

The history of the races of men is 
ma i ked by crime, treachery and dis ap- 
pointments. The first notable calam- 
ity is the flood of waters that sweeps 
over and rises above the highest moun- 
tains that could shelter man from de- 
struction. The down-pour of rain for 
40 days and nights, with its prevalence 
over every hiding place of man, leaves 
none to survive of man or beast, save 
only such as man's maker has provid- 
ed safety for. All others are destroy- 
ed. This sweeping destruction is caused 
by the wickedness of all the race, save 
righteous Noah. 

The next notable calamity that be- 
fel the race of God's people is the re- 
moval of the Lord's people into Baby- 
lon for 70 years, in order that sin 
should be punished, and the land have 
her 70 years of rest. 

The deterioration of the Lord's 
chosen race until they passed under 
the yoke of Roman conquest, and the 
most amazing outrage of the pent up 
wickedness of the Jewish race m the 
crucifixion of the Son of 'Jod, and the 
destruction of the temple, and the 
scattering of that race into all the 
earth follows. 

As the nations of earth fill up ihe 
measure of their wickedness, and 
hence decay, of their own corruption, 
so they perish. 

Then they grow and wax full of 
pride in their supposed progress, and 
flatter themselves they are rich -and 
increased in righteousness, not know- 
ing they are blind and naked, poor 
and miserable. When they flatter 
themselves that prosperity and glory 
shall come as the reward of their righl 
eousness, suddenly destruction comes 



ZlON'S LANDMARK. 



27^ 



as a whirlwind. 

111 me last ua) is periloUo unies snail 
coiiie, anu evil men and seuucers snail 
w ax worse and. worse, cooking at ana 
considering tue history ol tiie WOl'lu, 
we see the destruction 01 tile Juan ox 
Sin, and tiie son of perdition as false 
religion lifts its impious head as a 
dreadful dragon of persecuting and 
blasphemous power, as it exalts itself 
above all that is called God, and sits in 
the temple of Cod, but is called the 
man of sin. This monster of wicked- 
ness must come, and exalt itself, and 
run its course before the end of the 
world. For each principle, whether 
of truth or falsehood shall develop un- 
to is fulness whether of righteousness 
or wickedness, and show its nature 
and the consequences of its own 
growth and decay. See 2nd chap, of 
2nd Thess. 

P. D. G. 



"Let no man beguile you of your re- 
ward in a voluntary humility and 
worshipping of angels, intruding into 
those things which he hath not seen, 
vainly puffed up by his fleshly mind, 
And not holding the head, from which 
all the body by joints and bands hav- 
ing nourishment ministered, and knit 
together, increaseth with the increase 
of God," Col. 2:18-19. 

There are two things to be specially 
observed here. 

1st. Let no man beguile yon of 
your reward by a voluntary humility. 

2nd. Not holding the Head. 

There is danger of being beguiled. 
That is an old trick of the arch de- 
ceiver. No place is too sacred, and no 
opportunity to be neglected by him to 
decoy and ensnare the unsuspecting. 
Beware lest any man spoil you through 
philosophy and vain deceit, after the 
traditions of men. after the rudiments 
of the world. All the fulness of the 
♦•da»ad dwallt toddy iu Christ. Ib 



him the believer is complete. Then 
wny u»ien to, or take any nostrum 
ui«i men oner. \ oiuntary humility 
anu \\ orsnipping of angeis, or any 
other tnan desus Christ and him cruci- 
ned is 10 be rejected. However plaus- 
ible such things may appear shun as 
poison all sucn pretended helps. 

The fleshly mmd is easily putted up, 
and can be quickly imposed upon. By 
intruding into those things which he 
hath not seen he is easily flattered. As 
the old serpent held up to Eve the 
appearance of great gain there was 
in his declaration a contradiction of 
Cod's word. God doth know ye shall 
not die, but in the day ye eat thereof 
then your eyes shall be opened, and 
ye shall be as gods knowing good and 
evil. Thus the Serpent lettered her. 
beguiled her, causing her to think 
there would be great gain to her. H« 
operated on the fleshly mind or lust. 

Anything substituted in place of 
what God has ordered, any departure 
from God's command, or prohibition is 
a voluntary, self-w illed humility. How- 
ever plausible or advantageous it 
may seem to bo or appear, it should 
be shunned, it is not worshipping the 
Lord God. Though we or an angel 
from heaven preach any other gospel 
than that which we have preached let 
him be accursed. Such things have a 
show of wisdom in will-worship and 
humility, in neglecting the body. But 
what satisfies the flesh is no honor to 
God, nor comfort to his people. 

3rd. Jesus Christ is the head, the 
first born from the dead, and above 
all : exalted a prince and a Saviour 
All the body the church, by joints and 
bands having nourishment ministered, 
and knit together increaseth with the 
increase of God, or that which God 
supplies. Paul may plant, and Apollos 
may water, but Cod 2'ives the increase. 
The Lord add- to th< church such «» 
■let all be *aved. Of the ineraast of this 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



nnvrnment the. 



shall be no end to 
i lie throne oi tlie 



ept t 



s law had said thou shalt 



ciami oi- si; own, proVoii 10 be the Son 

mi i by the resurrection from the 

dead. n.ow wonderful is this body of 
tlie Led -Jesus, the fulness of him 
thai I Lleth all .11 all. The members of 
this body so r'.tly framed together 

Lord. Not one of its stakes shall ever 
be .removed, not one of its chords 
shall eVe'r be loosed. Holding Jesus 
the head we are complete in him, 
wanting nothing. Growing up into him 
in all things who is the head of all 
principality and power, if we are dead 
with him Prom the rudiments of the 
world, why are we subject to ordi- 
nances oi- rudiments of the world. 
Touch not. taste not, handle not, which 
are all to perish with the using, after 
the commandments and doctrines of 
men. But, "if ye then be risen with 
1 in ist. seek those Things which are 
ibove, where (Jhrist snteth on the 
rigid hand of God. Set your affection 
jii things above, nol on things on the 
uarth. for ye are dead, and your life 
s hid with Ciirist in God. When 
Jhrisl who is our life shall appear 
then shall ye also appear with him in 
>lory." 

All our salvation is above this world 
Ihrist is our hope. He is the quicken- 
ng Spirit, the Lord from heaven. 

T. D. G. 

WHENCE COMB WARS AND 
FIGHTINGS. 

James asks this question, "From 
ivhence come wars and fightings among 
fou?" James 1:1. He answers the 
[uestion by saying, "Come; they not 
lence even of your lusts that war in 
fpur members?" 

Paul said, "For I had not known 



Lust is coveting that which is for- 
bidden. The law of Moses said, thou 
shall not covet any thing that is thy 
neighbor's, Bx. 20:17. Of course if I 
esteem my nighbOr as 1 do myself I 
will not covet any thing thai he has. 
The law said, thou shalt love thy 
neighbor as thyself. The holy law 
said, thou shalt love the Lord thy God 
with all thy soul, thy mind arid thy 
strength, and neighbor as thyself. What 
a change must be wrought in us that 
would cause us to love our neighbor as 
we do ourselves. Love is the fulfilling 
of the law. One must be born of God 
to do this. 

Paul said I had not known sin, but 
by the law: for T had not known lust 
except the law had said thou shalt not 
eovet. By the law is the knowledge of 
sin. Where there is no law there is no 
sin. Tiie law is not made for a good 
man. One that is good needs no law 
to rest rain him from wrong, nor to 
compel or direct him to do right. But 
liiere is none good but one. that is God. 

Paul said, ''For I was alive without 
the law once: but when me command- 
ment came sin revived and I died." 

For 1 had not known lust except the 
law had said, "thou shalt not covet." 
Did you ever see that all that is in your 
nature is sinful — that in me that is in 
my flesh dwelleth no good thing? Our 
nature is full of lustful desires, sin 
working death in me by the law which 
is good. Did you ever see a carcass 
foul as a stench, putrid, full of maggots 
working so hateful and sickening, and 
ever feel that such is vile man — what 
we call the best man? 

Take the pitiable condition of the 
leading nations of Europe. Now in the 
fierceness of the death struggle of war. 
From whe nce comes this war. and all 



ch 



den to de- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



281 



vour. As tlie leopard stealthdy springs 

out of his lair to seize aud eat ins prey, 
so do men when aimed with envy and 
unlawlui desires spring- upon the vic- 
tims of their greed to consume them. 

'"Let no man say when he is tempt- 
ed 1 am tempted of God: for God can- 
not be tempted with evil, neither temp- 
telh he any man: But every man is 
iempted when he is drawn away of his 
own lust, and enticed," James 1:13-14. 

Then when lust hath conceived it 
brings forth sin, and sin when it is fin- 
ished brings forth death. 

Hut are the people of God ever em- 
broiled in bitter wars that come of 
evil desires, or of fleshly lusts which 
war against 1 lie soul? Does the love 
of money, which is the root of all evil, 
ever c anker in the nature of the chris- 
tian.' Do wars and lightings ever ap- 
pear among the people of God, the 
church of the first born? What lust 
hath not shown its foul nature as the 
whelps of evil beasts among the people 
calling themselves God's children? 
Why so many exhortations delivered 
onto the church of God to watch as 
well as to pray, if there is no danger 
of such tilings as war that consumes 
tile pleasant, tender fruit of the gar- 
den of the Lord? 

It is sad and shameful to read of the 
strife of the nations of earth, but from 
v. hem e come wars and lightings among 
you -among the brethren — among 
those that profess to l»e redeemed by 
the precious blood of Christ, and claim 
to be followers of the meek and lowly 
Son of God— the Lamb of God that 
taketh away the sin of the world. 

Laying aside all malice, guile, hypo- 
ei'ieies and evil speakings, as new born 
babes let us desire the sincere milk of 
the word that we may grow thereby. 
Paul said, I keep under my body, lest 
after having preached to others I my- 
self should be cast away. Nor should 
tk* watchfulness against this evil, lust- 



ful nature ever be relaxed. Nothing but 
death shall destroy this vile nature, the 
body of this death that besets us. Let 
us lay aside every weight, and the sin 
that doth so easily beset us, and let us 
run with patience the race that is set 
before us, looking unto Jesus the au- 
thor and finisher of our faith. 

We are called unto peace — are the 
children of peace — should walk in 
peace even to them that are without, 
should esteem the peace of Zion of far 
more value that money, ease, fame, 
wealth, honor or any and all the things 
of earth. 

How good it is to let brotherly love 
continue. 

P. D. G. 



uaries. 



JENNIE HUDGINS. 

By request of Bro. C. T. Hudgins, I 
am sending for publication the obitu- 
ary notice of his wife who was born 
April 4, 1859. She united in marriage 
to Bro. Hudgins Oct 26, 1879, to which 
union were born two children, both dy- 
ing in infancy. Afterwards she raised 
an adopted girl to be grown. 

Sister Hudgins obtained a hope in 
Christ in 1886 and joined the Primitive 
Baptist church at Ebenezer on Satur- 
day before the first Sunday in Aug. 
1887 and the next day was baptized by 
Eld. Albert Blalock. She lived a con- 
sistent member of this church until the 
Hoxboro church was organized when, 
together with her husband she moved 
lier membership to Jioxboro. She was 
a good member at Tioxboro, always 
filling her seat unless provideniall- 
hindered, until 1909 when she and her 
husband joined, by letter, the church 



l'X2 



DION'S LAXDMAM. 



at Burlington. In this church she 
spent lie r last days being a faithful 
and devoted member. 

Last I' all she became afflicted and 
for several weeks some oik; sat by her 
bedside day and night, with little hope 
of her recovery. But about the last of 
December or the first of Jan. she im- 
proved so she could walk about some 
and visit the neighbors. The night of 
February 4. she went to Brother E. H. 
Rammer's to preaching, and at the 
close of the meeting she appeared very 
happy in speaking of tbe Union and 
unity of the family of God. When the 
writer told her good night she said, "I 
will not be with you all long." 

On her way home that night, a few 
minutes after 9 o'clock, she was taken 
with acute indigestion and became un- 
conscious from which state she never 
recovered. She passed away the next 
morning (Feb. 5, 1915, at 6 o'clock to 
wake and weep no more. 

In conclusion 1 wish to say to her 
husband and adopted daughter: while 
her seat is vacant in your home one 
more is filled in heaven where all is 
joy and peace. At church we wull never 
again see her smiling face or get her 
glad hand shakes. 

.May the pi esence of the Lord be with 
ell those left behind that we may meet 
beyond tbe grave where parting is no 
more. 

W. C. JONES. 



Union Notices 

UNION NOTICE. 

The next session of the Black River 
Union will meet with the church at 
Reedy Prong meeting house, in John- 
ston County, N. C, on Saturday and 
5th Sunday in May, 1915. 

Reedy Prong is about 12 miles from 
teuton wkere vieitere will »e wet ou 



Friday P. M. and conveyed to the 
Union. 

Elder James H. Johnson is appointed 
to preach the introductory sermon, 
and Kld'er J. W. Strickland his altern- 
ate. 

All tovers of the truth are invited. 

ELDER W. G. TURNER, 

Moderator. 

('. HODGES. 

Union Clerk. 



UNION NOTICE. 

Elder P. I). Cold, Dear Brother :— 
Please publish that the next session of 
the Linvillc Union will be held with 
the church at Salisbury, on Saturday 
and fifth Sunday, in May, 1915. 

A general invitation is extended to 
all. 

Written by the request of the breth- 
ren. 

A. L. OWEN, 

Church Clerk. 



UNION NOTICE, 

The uex1 session of the Linvillc Un- 
ion is appointed to be held with the 
church at Salisbury, N. C, on Satur- 
day and 5th Sunday in May, 1915. 

All lovers of truth, especially minis- 
ters are invited to attend. 

W. L. TEAGUE, 
Union Clerk. 



UNION MEETING. 

The next session of the Conteatnet 
Union is appointed to be held with the 
church at Nabunta, Wayne County, N. 
C, Saturday :md 5th Sunday in May. 

Elder A. M. Crisp is appointed to 
preach the introductory sermon and 
Elder D. A. Mewborn his alternate. 

Brethren Hia r wish to come to tin* 
Union by rail will be met at Pikeville, 
N. C, and Goldsboro, N. C, on Friday 
•♦/ere tee Ith Sunday im May. 



JHON'S LANDMARK 



Those wisning to cojne please writs 
to Elder T. B. Lancaster, Saulston, X. 
a, R. 1, Box 2 4 and brother V. A. 
Bartlett at Saulston, N. C, R. 1. 

Those <<>n,nig by rail can get eon- 
feyancc by writing brother G. W. 
ifohnson, or brother J. Willis Creech, 
Benson, N. C. 1 'lease state what train 
ymi will come on. Get off at Benson. 

J. A. BATTON, 

Union Clerk. 



UNION NOTICE. 

The next session of the Silver Creek 
Union is appointed to be held with the 
'•lunch at Philadelphia on the 5th Sun- 
day in May, 1915. 

All Baptists are invited to attend. 

ELDER S. C. ROBERTS, 

Clerk. 



EASTERN UNION. 

The Eastern Union is to be held 
with the church at Bun go, and to 
commence on Friday before the 5th 
Sunday in May. 

All lovers of truth are invited to 
attend, especially ministers. We have 
but one ordained minister. 

A. W. AMBROSE, 

Union Clerk. 



UNION MEETING. 

Ths Cedar Island Union will he 
field with the church at North River, 
Friday, Saturday and 5th Sunday in 
Mar. ' 

JNO. P. TINGLE. 



UNION NOTICE. 

The next session of the Staunton 
River Union will meet with the church 
at Wetherford. commencing on Friday 
before the 5th Sunday in May, includ- 
ing Saturday and 5th Sunday. 



Wetherford is 2 1-2 miles west of 
Sycamore, on Southern Railroad. 

Brethren are invited. 

Done by order of the church. 

N. T. OAKS. Mod. 
A. C. OWEN, Clerk. 



UNION MEETING. 

The next session of the Skewarkey 
Union is appointed to be held Friday, 
Sat. and 5th Sunday in May, with 
Rocky Swamp ehtifch in Halifax Co., 
N. C. 

Visitors will be met Thursday .-ind 
Friday, May 27 and 28, at Halifax, oii 
the arrival of the Kinstou train, al 11 
A. M. and at Entield on the arrival «t 
the north b< unci train at 10 A. M. 

S. HASSELL. 



UNION MEETING. 

The next session of the Mill Branch 
txion is to dc held with the ehurch at 
Simpson Gree t. Saturday and 5th Sun- 
day in May. 



UNION MEETING. 

The Smilhfield Union is appointed 
to be held with the ehurch at Hannah's 
Creek, Johnston County, N. C. on Sat- 
urday and 5th Sunday in May. 

Brethren, sisters and specially mi* 
isters are invited to attend. 



UNION MEETING. 

The Uoid willing, the Black Creek 
Union will meet with the church at 
Seotts M. IU, Wilson County, N. C, on 
Saturday and 5th Sunday in May. 

Elder P. D. Gold was chosen to 
preach the introductory sermon, and 
Elder J. F. Farmer to be his alternate. 

Messengers and visitors will be m«t 
at Lucania, N. C, Friday evening and 
Saturday morning. 

R. H. BOSWELL, 

Union Clerk. 



2S4 



ZTON'S LANDMARK. 



Appointments 



ELDER J. P. FARMER. 

Angier- — Sat. and Sunday, May 1 and 
2. 

Oak Grove— Tuesday. 
Willow Springs — Wednesday. 



R. E. ADAMS. 

Bethsaida — Sat. and 1st Sunday in 
May. 

Primitive Zion Monday. 
Gif1>— Tuesday. 

Angier— Wednesday and at night. 
Sandy Gro/e — Tlmrsday. 
Willow Spring — Friday. 
Middle Creek— Sat. and 2nd Sun- 
day. 



ELDER J. E. ADAMS. 

Newport — Sat. and 1st Sunday in 
May. 

Morehead City — Monday. 
Marshallburg — Tuesday and it 
night. 

Davis Shore— Thursday and at 
night. 

Nelsons Bay — Friday evening at 4 
p. m. 

Hunting Quarter — Sat. and 2nd 
Sunday. 

Hog Tsland and Cedar Island week 
after and Sat. and 3rd Sunday at 
Cedar Island. 

Jones Bay — Tuesday night. 

Goose Creek — Wednesday. 

Beaulah — Thursday. 

Rose Bay — Friday. 

Tiny Oak — Sat. and 4th Sunday. 

East Lake — Tuesday night and 
Wednesday. 

Kitty Hawk Banks— Sat. and 5th 
Sunday. 

Powells Point — Monday and at 
night. 



Elizabeth City — Tuesday night and 
Wednesday. 

Flatty Creek — Saturday and 1st 
Sunday in June. 

Bethlehem — Saturday and 2nd Sun- 
day in June. 

Concord— Monday and Tuesday. 



Associations. 

ASSOCIATION. 

e next session of the Mayo Asso- 
m nil be held with the church at 
ell Creek ' Saturday, third Sun- 
and Monday of May, 1915, seven 
, from Critz K. R. Station. 

J. WALTER HUTCHENS, 

Church Clerk. 



ASSOCIATION. 
The next session of the Silver Creek 
Association will be held with Globe 
church, Caldwell County, N. C, com- 
mencing on Friday before the 3rd Sun- 
day in September, 1915. We invite all 
true and orderly Baptists to visit us. 



Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Blood. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Nerves. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Liver. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Kidneys. 
Take 4 B. B. B. B. for the Stomach. 
Price $1 per box or 6 Boxes for $5.00. 
Address, 

MRS. ELDER CHAS. M. REED, 

CONNERSVILLE, IND., 
R. No. 1, Box G., 
Agents Wanted. 



A SPEEDY Cure 
For Headaches 
And Neuralgia 



The YUM DRU(i CO., Durham, N. C. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



285 




MAKE MONEY CANNING 

Get an "EL-FLO" Canner. Enables you to put up fruits, vegetables, 
berries, etc.. for yourself and neighbor*. M:ik.- lm.iiejrs.-lHuK i loin e. canned 
goods— always ton prices f r ,., n stores. :''"'«' Hovernnient •, lvnlsant i To- 
mato Club Members endorse the "EL-FLO." Price $3.5© up. Send 
stamp today forlyi") catalog. Wo also manufacture the Continuous Heat- 
ing Capping Steel— Seals cans quicker, easier. Agents wanted. 

HOME CANNER MFG. CO., Dept. 6, Hickory, N. C. 



Cancer Cured at the KeMam Hospital. 

The record of the Kel'am Hospital 
is without parallel in hi3tory, having 
cured without '.he uce of the Knife, 
Acids, X-Ray or Radium, over ninety 
per cent, of the many hundreds of 
sufferers from Cancer which it has 
treated during the past eighteen 
years. We want every man and wom- 
an in the United States to know what 
we are doing. KELLAM HOSPITAL, 
1617 W. Main St., Richmond, Va. 
Write for literature. 



WENEEDU Book Agents. Both Sexes, 
for best seller published. Particulars 
and outfit free GEO. W. SOMERS, 
1-A, St. Augustine, Florida. 



§DR. 
DR. H. H. 



r,,Iavs. Trial treatment sentfree 
THOMAS E. GREEN, Successorto 
GREENS SONS, Box H, Chatsworth, Ga. 



ENTERTAINING BOOK 
I have made an arrangement for a 
v«ry nite Oxford Bible for $1.25. 

P. D. GOLD, 



MALLEST BIBLE ON 
iEARTH 

{watch 




only 10c stamps or silver and it is yours by return mail, also 
our mammoutb offerwhereby you can distribute themamong 
your friends and earn valuable prizes or money. 3 for 26c. 
W- MAGE CO.. 132B 3*7 W. Madison St., CHICAGO 



Renew Your Health 

A NATURE'S 



WITHOUT THE EXPENSE AND 
LQSS OF TIME NECESSARY 
FOR A VISIT TO THE SPRING 



THE CRISIS 

There comes a time in the life of practi- 
cally every man and woman wiun their di- 
gestive or eliniinauve organs, or both, iail 
to respond to drugs prepared by numan 
skill, in fact drugs seem to do harm about 
as much harm as good tor their systems re- 
bel against all drugs. These are the cases 
which physicians call "stubtorn" and "chron- 
ic" for the reason that they persist iu spite 
of drug treatment. 1 uo not refer to in- 
curable diseases such as cancer and con- 
sumption, but to that larger class of func- 
tional r'isorders which we meet every day, 
where the organs of digestion u.n.1 elimina- 
tion are impaired. 

For this class of cases our best physi- 
cians and our big city specialists send "heir 
wealthy patients to the mineral springs 
where, in the great majority of cases they 
are permanently restored or decidedly bene- 
fitted. But what about the poor man or wo- 
man who cannot- spr.re the time to spend 
several weeks or possibly months at a 
health resort? Shall circumstances deny 
them the restoration to health which Nature 
has provided? Read my answer in the cou- 
pon at the bottom of this pae,e. 

I have the utmost confidence in the Shi- 
var Mineral Sprin§ Water for to it I owe 
my Restoration to Health and probably my 
Life. It has made me tens of thousands of 
friends in all parts of America and even 
in foreign cou + ries, whose faces I have 
never seen. Yet I count them my friends 
for the Shivar Spring Water has bound 
them to me by lasting gratitude. 

I ask you to read their letters, a few 
samples of which I publish below for your 
benefit, and if you find among them any 
encouragement as to your own health do 




not hesitate to accept my offer which has 
no limits or conditions except those shown 
on the coupon. if you could read the 
letters 'that come to me daily, numbering 
about ten thousand a j car, and the vast 
mapority of them similar to those printed 
below, you \vould not wonder that 1 make 
this offer displaying my absolute sonfidence 
in the restorative powers of Shivar Mineral 
Water. 

INDIGESTION 

• Savannah, Ga. 

I was suffering with indigestion, stomach 
and liver disorders and all its train of hor- 
rifying phenomena for several months. 1 
had lived on milk, soft eggs, shredded wheat, 
a very insufficient diet for an active working 
man, and, of course, from disease ai d starv- 
ation was in a very low state of nervous 
vitality and general debility. I ordered ten 
gallons of your Mineral Water which I used 
continuously, reordering when necessary, 
and in four months gained twenty-nine 
pounds, was strong and perfectly well, and 
have worked practically every day since. 
It acts as a general renovator of the system. 
I prescribe it in my practice, and it has in 
every instance had the desired effects. It is 
essential to use this water in as large quan- 
tities as possible, for its properties are so 
happily blended pnd in such proportion t hat. 
they will not disturb the most delicate sys- 
tem. It is purely Nature's remedy. 

A. L. R. AVANT, M. D. 
LaGrange, Ga., Nov. 25, 1914. 

I feel it my duty to suffering humanity to 
make public announcement of (he benefits I 
have derived from Shivar Spring Water. I 
have been a sufferer for the past twenty- 
five years from indigestion and dyspepsia. 



Alter one week's trial oi Shivar Water I 
commenced to improve, and after drinking 
it tor four weeks I gained fifteen pounds, 
i teel better and stronger than i have in 
twenty-nve years. 1 strongly recommend 
this Water to any one with stomach trouble 
of any character, and truly believe it will 
(.me ulcer of the stomach, i am writing this 
voluntarily and trust it will fall in the hands 
of many who are so unfortunate as to be 
afflicted with indigestion and . nervous dy- 
spepsia. 

C. V. TRU1TT, 
President Unity Coton Mills. 
DYSPEPSIA 

Baltimore, Md., April 30, 1914. 
For many years 1 suffered with stomach 
trouble as a direct result of asthma. I con- 
sulted the very best specialist in this coun- 
try, and spent quite a large sum of money 
in my endeavor to get relief. However, I 
had about come to the conclusion that my 
case was hopeless, but by accident I hap- 
pened to get hold of one of youx- booklets, 
and decided to try Shivar Spring Water. 
Alter drinking the water for about three 
weeks 1 was entirely relieved, and since 
that time have suffered but little inconven- 
ience from my trouble. 1 cheerfully recom- 
mend the use of your Water to any one that 
may be suffering from stomach trouble. 

OSCAR T. SMITH, 
Vice-Pres. Young & Seldon Co., Bany Sta- 
tioners. 

Fill Out This Coupon and Mail it Today 
Shivar Spring, 

Box 55T, Shelton, S. C. 

Gentlemen: I accept your offer and en 
close herewith two dollars ($2.00) for 
ten gallons of Sbivar Mineral Spring 
Water. I agree to give it a fair trial in 
accordance with tiie instructions which 
you will send, ?nd if I derive no benefit 
therefrom you agree to refund the price 
in full upon the receipt of the two emp- 
ty demijohns, which I agree to return 
promptly. 

Name 

P. O 

Express Office 

Please write distinctly 



Beuna Vista, Va., Oct. 2, 1914. 
It is a great pleasure to tell you that your 
Water has been a great benefit, I may say 
a great blessing, to me. My wife says it 
has helped me more than anything else I 
•ver tried. I have been, for thirty years, 
a sufferer from stomach troubla. 

REV. E. rf. ROWE, 
Co-President Southern Eeminary. 
RHEUMATISM 

Leeds, S. C. 
I have tested your Spring Water in sever- 
al cases of rheumatism, chronic indigestion, 
ttdmey aid Bladder tirenbles, and ia aerveiu 



ana sick headaches, and find that it has act- 
ed nicely in each case, and I believe that if 
used continually for a reasonable time will 
produce a permanent cure It will purify 
the blood, relieve debility, stimulate the 
action oi the liver, kidneys and bladder, aid- 
ing them in throw ing oil all poisonous mat- 
ter, c. A. CROSBY, M. U. 

Florence, S. C. 
I suffered with indigestion and kidney trou- 
ble, and a year ago was stricken with acute 
articular rheumatism; was helpless for 
months , and since using your Spring Wa- 
ter I am walki:.r r without and crutch and 
improving daily. Indigestion much relieved. 
1 wish 1 could write Shivar Spring Water in 
the sky so that the world could become ac- 
quainted with it. 

MRS. THEO. KUKER. 
BILIOUSNESS 

Greenville, S. C, Feb. 2i>, 1914. 

For over two years, following a nervous 
breakdown, I have suffered with a liver so 
torpid that ordinary remedies were absolute- 
ly powerless. Under such circumstances, I 
came to Shivar Spring, and began drinking 
the Water. Upon r.dvice however, the first 
night I took a laxative; the second nighi a 
milder one. Since then I have taken none 
at all. The effect of the water has been re- 
markable — its action on my liver most mark- 
ed, and my health and spirits greatly im- 
proved. I am satisfied that the laxative, fol- 
lowed by the Water, was the proper treat- 
ment in my case. My condition is now per- 
fect. S. A. DERIEUX. 
REYNAL AND CYSTIC 

Columbia, S. C. 

I have suffered for eight years with kid- 
ney trouble and inflammation of the bladder 
to the extent that I would have to get up 
during the night some live or six times. 
After using this water only a few days, I nn 
entirely relieved and suffer no more effect of 
the trouble whatever. • .1. P. U. 

High Point, N. C, Oct. 6, 1914. 

My wife has had a bad kidney trouble 
for several years. She has been using the 
water only about three weeks and it has al- 
ready made her a new woman. Her color 
is much improved her appetite is all that 
she could wish for, her digestion seems to 
be perV-t. We give Shivar Springs credit 
for it all. T. G. S. 

GALLSTONES 

Greenville, S. C. 

Shivar Spring Water cured my mother of 
gallstones, or, I might say, it snatched her 
from the hospital door, as the doctors had 
said nothing short of an operation would 
do her anv good. After drinking the Water 
she was able to get out of bed. and is today 
stout and healthy. I hope these few line-* 
will be of help to some one suffering as my 
mother did. W. .1. ST R AWN 

Williamston. N. C, Oct. 3, 1914 

My doctor said I would have to he operat- 
ed on for gallstones, but since T have l^r>i 
drinkine vour water T haven't had to h»ire 
a deetor. ' W. W. «BWAR»J. 



288 ZION'S LANDMARK. 



"A Card of Heartfelt Thanks. 
"Blessed Relief." 
RHEUMATISM 
Cured to Stay Cured 
We desire to thank the many read- 
ers of the "Zions Landmark" for 
their kind words testifying ta the 
"blessed relief" received from using 
Aunt Lydia's Root and Herb Rheumat- 
ic Remedy. We are unable to write 
each one personally, therefore we 
take this method of thanking each 
and every one of you publicly. We 
assure you, such testimony as you 
have sent us, is very gratifying, and 
we rejoice with you in the knowledge 
that in our remedy, you have at least 
found "blessed relief" from your suf- 
ferings. 

Sincerely thanking you, we are, 
Yours for better health, 
Lydia E. Small Remedy Co., 
LL Fenway Station, Boston, Mass. 

Our booklet, "Cause a Cure" of 
Rheumatism IS FREE TO ALL. 



AGENTS 

$30 to $50 Weekly. Men and Women. 




Selling the New Im- 
proved MONITOR Self 
Heating FLAT IRON. 

Postively the lowest pric- 
ed and fast3st selling 
Iron made. Over 650,000 



in use. Evans, N. Car. sold 2 doz. on Sat. 
Mrs. Nixon, Vt., sold 8 first half day. No 
experience needed — sells itself. New Terms. 
Binding Guarantee. Exclusive territory. 
Sample free to workers. Write today. 
Monitor Sad Iron Co., 127 Orange Street, 
Hickory, N. C. 



Headaches 

There are reveral different kinds of head- 
aches classified according to their causes. 

And whether induced by nervous disor- 
ders, or disorders of the digestive organs or 
disorders of the blood, they are alike very 
unpleasant symptoms. 

Headaches ar something more than symp- 
toms, for the pain reads upon-itself and 
grows worse if not relieved. 

It 's fortunate that relief can usually be 
obtained by the use of Mentholatum extern- 
ally ppp ! ed to the forehead :nd temples and 
within the nostrils. 

This usually gives relief and avoids resort 
to the use of opiates and anodynes. 

Mentholatum can do no harm. 

As a delicate counter irritant its useful- 
ness in giving relief is all classes of head- 
aches is well known. 

Tl»» «ai w« of th» beada«hea should, how- 



ever, be determined and a general systemat- 
ic treatment should be adopted to rectify 
the conditions which cause them. 

Mentholatum r.lso has a wide range of 
usefulness for sunburn, bruises, insect bites, 
summer colds and other forms of inflamma- 
tion. 




There may be bever- 
ages that are made to 
look like it— but there is 
no beverage thatcan make 
the same delightful im- 




Demand the genuine by full 



The Coca-Cola Company 

ATLANTA. GA. 



(9 



■iuN'S LANDMARK 

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY 
,AT 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

^r^vtiv e or Old School Baptist 



VOL. ZUHPr WILSON, N. C, MAY 15, 1915. NO. 13 




P. D. GOLD, Editor, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Asso. Editor, Floyd, Va. 



$1.50 PER YEAR. 



The Purpose of Zion's Landmark 



" Ask for the trfd paths where is the gfXid way." 

By fche help <*l the Lord this paper will contend for tn» 
•anient landmark, guided by its stakes of Truth, anc 
rtrengtiiet*eo by its ccrds of tare. 

It hopes to reject all traditions and institutions of mm. 
and regard only the Bible aa the standard of truth. 

It orges the peoplo to search the scriptures, and ©bey 
Jests, the King in the Holy Hill of Son, keeping them 
selves unspotted from the world. 

It aims to eent'^nd for the mystery of the faith in God, 
the Father, Jesus, the Mediator, and the Half Spirit, fee 
blessed Comforter. 

NOTICE! 

When a subscriber desires his paper changed he should 
state plainly both the old and new pestoffiees. When one 
wishes his paper stopped, let him send what da*, aad eiee 
state hi* postofiee. 

Let eaeh subscriber ^>ay for his paper in advance il p*s- 
afcJe, and when a* renews give the same name it has beau 
going m, unless be wishes it changed, them ke should state 
both the old and the new names. 

If the money sent has not been receipted, please inform 
me of it. When you can always send money by money order 
or cheek, er draft, or registered letter er by express. 

Bach subscriber ean tell the time to which he paid for the 
paper by noticing tine date just after his name. 

All brethren and friends are requested to act as agent* 

All names end poet office* should be written plainly. 

All lovers of gospel truth are invited to write for it — if 
so impressed. 

May grace, mercy and peace be multiplied to all lovers 
*f truth. 

AH eomBKunieatioas, business lettertt, remittances of P. 0 
Orders, moaef, drafts, etc., should be i»nt to 



P. B. 0©LD, WSeon, R. C 



ZION'S LANDMARK 

DEVOTED TO THE CAUSE OF JESUS CHRIST. 



FEED1NO HER SOUL. 

My Dear Brother -Gold :— The rain 
drops from that little cloud are still 
feeding my soul with the nourishing 
moisture which so abundantly fell 
from his sanctuary yesterday. 1 see 
this morning how a poor sinner like 
me, can be saved from their sins and 
be satisfied in Jesus. Since the death 
of my loved nnes, it has been hard for 
me to be reconciled to my loss, but this 
morning, I feel that all is well with me. 
Cod knows best and never makes any 
mistake. My life is in his hands, and 
1 most humbly desire to live and I 
in humble submission to his will. He 
was a man of sorrow and acquainted 
with grief, and we must learn of him to 
enter the pearly gates of heaven. I 
see his mercy and love, his perfection, 
and know that my vile nature can 
never be satisfied while I live in the 
flesh, only as Cod gives me a little 
shower from the cloud of heaven to lift 
my eyes beyond this vale of tears. 

David expresses my feelings, when 
he says "One thing have I desired of 
the Lord, that will I seek after, that I 
may dwell in the house of the Lord all 
the days of my life to behold the beau- 
ty of the Lord, and to inquire in his 
temple." I find peace there, that the 
world can not give and without the 
Lord I am nothing and worse than 
nothing. 

Thank God for the strength he has 



given you to so ably proclaim the 
glorious power of a merciful and 
righteous Cod who liveth and abideth 
forever. 

Remember me in love to your wife, 
and pray that the Lord will be with 
ine in all I do. 

Fondly, 
SALL1E F. AVCOCK. 
Fremont, N. C. 



ASK MY VIEW OF DEUT. 32 :25. 

Dear Brother Cold:— If not asking 
too much of you I wish you would 
please give me your view of Deut. 
32:25. "The sword without and ter- 
rors within shall destroy both the 
young man and the virgin, the suck- 
ling, also with the man of gray heirs." 

I feel too unworthy to write much of 
Cod's dealing with his people, but 
without him I can do nothing. So I 
put all of my faith in him. For he is 
able to save me, if it is his will. If 
God is for us, is for me who can be 
against me? "Only if thou carefully 
hearken unto the voice of the Lord thy 
God to observe to do all these com- 
mandments which I command thee this 
day. For the Lord thy God blesseth 
thee, as he promised, and thou shalt 
lend unto many nations." 

Please give your view on Jeremiah 
31:22, "How long wilt thou go about, 
O thou backsliding, for the Lord hath 
created a new thing in the earth, a 
woman shall compass a man." 



2; to 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



This new thing created in the earth 
is Jesus. Behold a virgin shall con- 
ceive and bring forth a son, and thou 
shalt call his name Jesus, for he shall 
save his people from their sins. The 
Lord gives this sign unto his people. 
Wherever he gives this sign, this un- 
derstanding to the poor and the needy- 
there springs up in this earth a bless- 
ing that shall take away the curse 
from the earth, and the fruit of that 
earth shall be to glory in the Lord who 
takes away the curse from the earth. 
When the Lord creates this wonder in 
the earth then this inhabitant shall no 
longer speak this way, but a new lan- 
guage shall be given to these inhabi- 
tants, a new song shall be put in their 
mouth, and they say, "The Lord bless 
thee 0 habitation of justice, and moun- 
tain of holiness." The Lord shall sat- 
iate the weary soul, and shall replen- 
ish every sorrowful soul." The rest 
of Jesus shall be glorious. Then your 
young men shall see visions, and your 
old men shall dream dreams. 

Brother Rogers adds, I will tell you 
about some of my dreams here of late. 
I dreamed that the Lord told me to go 
out and to talk to the people. I went 
to a house, and saw a man and a wom- 
an at work. The man was handing 
something to his wife; and I asked 
them to give me something to eat, and 
to let me stay all night, and the man 
was willing for me to stay, but the 
woman was not. As I started off I 
told them the Lord would remember 
them, and then they told me to come 
back, and I told them not so, and I 
went out. It was then night. I met 
up with several different bands of peo- 
ple. From their work which they were 
doing they seemed to be a wicked peo- 
ple; and I begged them to turn from 
their wicked ways, and to serve the 
Lord Jesus. I plead with them a long 
time. Some seemed to hear, and some 
would not. So I traveled on and all 



at once I came into a bright world. 
Just as far as my eyes would let me 
see it was that way. I went up to a 
large white house, and the man bid me 
to come in, and by that time his wife 
appeared, and there was a long table, 
and they were then ready to eat; and 
the man bid me to wash, and 1 told lain 
to wash; and he told me to'eome hi 
wash with him. 1 told him that I 
would not. When he got through he 
prepared water and I washed, and he 
bid me to sit down and eat : and we all 
sat down. About that time his wife 
said, he is a man of God, and that he 
had been badly treated. In a short 
while the people began coming in and 
partook of the food. They were < 
ing in and going out as bees working 
all the time that I was there ; and they 
all were dressed alike in white. The 
house was so long I could not see from 
one end to the other, and every thing 
was white in the house. J do not re- 
member going out of the house. I 
awoke. I thought it was the Lord's 
house. 

The man that bid me to wash made 
it known to me that he was the Lord. 
I know that I am a changed man. For 
the things I once loved I now hate, and 
the things I hated I now love. I hope 
and believe that it is the work of the 
Lord, of our Lord and Saviour Jesus 
Christ, He says he that believeth and 
is baptized shall be saved, and he that 
believeth not shall be damned. I hope 
that I am one that does believe. 

This is my first attempt to write to 
the Landmark. My wife joins me in 
love to you and Sister Gold. 

I will close by saying that I hope 
that the Lord will bless you with 
health and strength to preach his gos- 
pel many years longer. For I certainly 
believe that you are one of God's true 
ministers. So pray for me whenever 
you have a mind is my prayer for 
Christ's sake. 



DON'S LANDMARK. 



291 



Your brother in Christ I hope, 

J. T. ROGERS. 
Durham, N. C, R, 2, Box 28. 

A GOOD LETTER. 

Elder P. D. Gold, Dear Brother:— I 
herewith enclose a letter which 1 re- 
ceived from Sister Martha Womble 
which 1 think others will enjoy read- 
ing as well as 1 have. If you have the 
space in the Landmark please publish 
same. 

Your brother in hope of eternal life, 
A. B. DENSON. 

Kooky Mount, N. C. 

Dear Brother Denson : — To-morrow 
is preaching day and how bad I want 
to go, but Dossey thinks it best not to 
go, so I shall have to give it up, hoping 
1 can be contented and able to meditate 
on the sweet promise at home. 

Brother Denson, I don't know what 
you think of dreams, but I desire to 
tell you one and hear what you think 
about it. When 14 or 15 years of age 
I dreamed I was traveling a road with 
mama and my aunt. After traveling a 
while we came to some of the blackest 
mud holes of water I ever saw, and 
soon after to a large pond of water as 
black as those holes were. The bridge 
which was of rotten pine poles about 
the size of my arm were lying length- 
wise and then crossed. My aunt said, 
I have crossed here before; let me see 
if it is solid. She walked around and 
put her foot on the first pole and give 
it a shake; then it was all floating on 
the water. She said it was all rigid 
snd so we crossed over and travelled a 
good distance and come to some 
boles of blood. And after passing a 
few of them we came to another pond 
exactly like the other one only it was 
filled with blood and had the same 
crossway of rotten poles. So I was the 
one to see if it was solid. I went round 



and set my foot on the first pole and 
I and the poles all washed away out 
in the pond. 1 quickly cried to the 
Lord for help and a man rode up on 
the other side and said, '"those rotten 
poles will have to be ourned up and 
that will dry the blood and you can 
cross." And the whoie tiling was on 
fire in a moment's time, i raised my 
hands and cried to God for deliver- 
ance. The next thing 1 knew 1 was sit- 
ting in the back door of the trails 
church witli a little child in my hands, 
and then 1 awoke. Now this dream 
did not seem to mean very much to 
me, though 1 often thought of it. 1 
told it to mania and she cried, so 1 
never said any more about it. Just be- 
fore Brother Abrams moved to Rocky 
Mount we were talking, and 1 told 
him about it, and he felt sure it was to 
show me the true church. But it did 
not seem so to me. it was a dream and 
that was all, as 1 had many more that 
impressed me deeper than that did. So 
1 dismissed it entirely as I was pretty 
resthss and wanted something be- 
sides a dream, and 1 feel like 1 got it. 
And may the Almighty God deliver 
me in time to come as He has in the 
past. |' $J 

Brother Denson, when those burnt 
spots came on my poor body I suffered 
untold misery, yet the body could en- 
dure far better than my restless mind. 
1 ©an never tell what I passed through 
for eleven long months before 1 went 
to the church. For thirteen long 
years I sought for rest and found none. 
I often found myself repeating these 
words: "My soul searcheth for that 
it loveth and findeth it not. As the 
water panteth after the water brooks 
so panteth my soul after thee oh God." 

At the age of seventeen I believe I 
was shown what I was and wher'e I 
stood. It seems to me T lived through 
ages on that memorable night. I saw 
how I should live and the path I should 



292 



SIQN'S LANDMARK. 



walk, and for two years i was content- 
ed at my lot no matter what it was. 
iiut how restless afterwards, looking a 
home far and near and nothing' suited 
me. 1 knew well what i had been 
shown, or rather felt the want of it. i 
never intended to be baptized, and 
searched for a home every where else, 
and at last had to give it up. it was 
then 1 was shut up in that low desolate 
wilderness, 1 tried to tell you of. Those 
words were often with me : you have 
had a warning of that which was to 
come. How 1 longed to tell those dear 
people of that warning, ami often 
united myself with these words, ' ' Oh 
ye generations of vipers who hath 
warned you to flee from the wrath to 
come; go ye therefore and bring forth 
fruit meet for repentance." 

I had nothing to carry, empty and 
blank. Oh how I did long for rest. I 
might tell them of the warning and 
they would not hear it, and if they did 
it was not right. In the sight of God I 
would be no better off. 1 did not love 
every body and I really thought I 
would have to love every human on 
earth before 1 could go to the church. 
But alas ! how different when Brother 
Gold preached, He that hath faith let 
him have it unto himself saith the 
Lord. Then I was set in the solitary 
corner of my little wilderness and at 
last burnt out. 

I know what it is to burn— body 
and mind to be drawn to one side and 
hardly travel at all — trying to keep up 
so I could get to church and two days 
before meeting having to give up, and 
oh, the grief of my heart and the bitter 
tears I shed. When those words were 
given me with a power I shall never 
forget, "to trust him and obey," my 
body was free from those awful burnt 
spots and my mind was at rest. I had 
trusted him all my life and he had de- 
livered me so many times that T re- 
solved to obey. Then I thought what 



the old colored woman told me : " The 
Lord will heal you and when lie heals 
you you will be healed. I have seen 
them spots before now." 1 believe 
she had, 1 also believe the Lord healed 
me, for it has been eleven months since 
and I have never been troubled with 
those burnt places since, and oh, the 
rest I found beneath the water. The 
beauty 1 saw and the joy I felt, no 
human will ever know. 1 felt I passed 
over the first^pond while searching for 
a home among the people of this 
world, but when it came to me to see 
how the crossing was I had to have 
help and looked for it on high, and 
when these old poles of mine were 
burnt sufficiently, how willing I was 
to sit down in that back door and look 
to the little child for help, and accept 
Him as my Saviour and my all. What 
a mystery those burnt places were to 
me all the while until a few days after 
I was baptized, and then through that 
dream I saw 7 it all so plain. And the 
sweet peaceful rest I enjoyed; I knew 
no pain "nor sorrow for two and a half 
months. The low flat wilderness was 
the most beautiful and level little field 
I ever saw. I could look around, and 
it was the same piece of ground, but 
so white and clean. I just seemed to 
be walking around in there singing 
praises to God and saying, oh the joys 
of thy salvation, and resting all the 
time. 

"How wonderful are the works of 
the Lord and His ways past finding 
out." I could say, if this is a foretaste 
of that Avhich is to come how I wish I 
could enter eternity now 7 and for ever 
rest and sing praises to the dear Lord 
who had done so much for me. 

But alas, T little knew what was in 
store for me. Can you think how I 
loathed the idea of throwing my body 
in the hands of man for ease, after be- 
ing so suddenly healed by the Divine 
power and sweet words, "trust him 



ZI©N'S LANDMARK. 



and obey him." I felt like it was 
right for me to suffer and when the 
Lord saw fit he would heal me again 
like I hope and feel he has. But "the 
Lord works in a mysterious way His 
wonders to perform." While suffer- 
ing untold misery day and night these 
words were continually with me: "As 
thy days are so shall thy strength be," 
and 1 could think of nothing but dear 
old Brother Gold — bow old he had 
lived to be, how firm and steady his 
steps were and what a few days his 
afflictions had been. How well his 
days must have been spent and how 
well his strength has held out. Surely 
my days had been badly spent and my 
strength so weak, it semd there was no 
relief for poor me. The first of Feb- 
ruary, on Monday night, I was lying 
on my bed thinking how bad I did 
want to be of some service to my little 
family, instead of a burden. All the 
doctors advised me to go to the hospi- 
tal, and 1 wanted my operation to be 
at home. But they denied me that; so 
while meditating on it, it came to me 
this way: The Lord has blessed man 
with the wise knowledge and .skillful 
* hands to relieve poor suffering bod- 
ies; it has been done and doubtless 
mine could be relieved also. But what 
if I never recovered. When the words 
were given me; "Thy God reigneth 
and the mercy of the Lord endureth 
forever," I was ready in a sense to go 
but I dreaded the knife. We made ar- 
rangements and got off on Thursday. 
I never felt so humble and so depend- 
ent in all my life. It was so hard to 
leave my little children, not knowing 
what the outcome woidd be, but I feel 
like I left them in good hands and in 
my weak way earnestly committed 
them to the dear Lord. I feel like I 
was blest in more ways than one, of 
which I feel thankful. I felt like a 
prisoner making ready for his sentence 
not knowing what his doom would be, 



but felt it would be just. I stood my 
operation well the doctor said, and on 
waking I suffered for three days, but 
in three more I felt like 1 could get up. 
How easy I felt after not knowing an 
easy hour since the first of August. I 
had three operations in one, and the 
doctors often told me they iiad never 
known any one to get on better than 
I did. 1 feel that I was blest to re- 
turn home in 22 days, and I often re- 
peated these words: "God's purpose 
ripens fast; unfolding every hour: the 
bud may have a bitter taste, but sweet 
will be the flower." 

Brother Williams came and preach- 
ed for us one night soon after we came 
home and how glad I was to see them 
all and to hear him speak again. 

I often think of the little meeting 
we had at Brother Whitfield's and 
how I did enjoy it. I hope you may 
have a mind to visit us again soon and 
I surely hope I won't be sick. I was 
so sorry that it turned out like it did. 

Please excuse this letter: have read 
it all over and have not written at ai" 
ljke I intended to. When I am at work 
my mind is to write and so many 
things pass through my mind, but 
when I sit down to write all seems 
to banish and I have to write it like it 
comes. 

Pray for me and mine, for I greatly 
feel the need of prayer and may I be 
humbly kept in the right way that I 
may not cause you all to throw me off 
from my little seat in the back door 
which is a resting place indeed. 
Love to Sister Denson. 

Yours in hope of eternal life. 

MARTHA ROB BINS WOMBLE. 
Nashville, N. C. 



ASKED TO WRITE. 

Elder P. D. Gold, 

Dear Brother: — As many brethren 
and sisters asked me to write them 



hi 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



through the Landmark, by your per- 
mission 1 will try to grant their re- 
quest. 

1 returned home March 26, and 
found all well, for which I felt very 
thankful. 1 was blessed to till all of 
my appointments. 1 enjoyed usual lib- 
erty most all the time. I want to say 
that 1 received much kindness from 
the many good people which I met, 
and 1 will ever remember them with a 
thankful heart. 1 found the churches 
all in peace so far as I learned. I 
found no discord among the preaching 
brethren. 

Dear brethren, let us ever earnestly 
contend for the faith once delivered to 
the saints, and not strive about words 
to no profit, but strive for the things 
that make for peace, for behold how 
good and how pleasant it is for breth- 
ren to dwell together in unity. 

We would be glad to have any of 
the preaching brethren to visit us in 
this country and preach for us. 

1 would be glad to receive a letter 
from any whom I met. 

Your brother in hope, 

J. D. VASS. 

Gap, Va. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Bro. Gold: — I guess you think 
1 have been very negligent, which I 
have. 1 am quite sure you will pardon 
me. My family, or at least the greater 
part of them have deep colds, but we 
are all up. I feel very thankful it is 
no worse than it is. 

We had a very pleasant quarterly 
meeting. We had Bros. Hassell and 
Corbet to preach for us. We had sev- 
eral visiting brethren and sisters from 
sister churches. Bro. Lawrence House 
from Kehukee, Bro. Nathan Worsley 
and several others from Red Banks, 
Briery Swamp and Flat Swamp. 

I certainly do enjoy having the 



brethren and sisters to come to see us 
at Great Swamp, we are so few in num- 
ber. 

Enclosed you will find money order 
for $1.50 for the good old Landmark 
of which I have been a reader every 
since my first recollection. 

I hope I may enjoy the privilege of 
reading it always. 

Remember me kindly to Sister Gold 
and come to see us at Great Swamp 
whenever you can. 

From an unworthy sister, 

(MRS.) W. J. BRILEY. 
Greenville, N. C. 



DESCRIPTION OF TRIP. 

Elder P. D. Gold, 

Dear Brother : — Having been re- 
quested by some of the readers of your 
most excellent paper, "Zion's Land- 
mark," to write a description of my 
recent trip in your country, I now 
undertake to occupy the present mo- 
ments in an attempt to grant their re- 
quest. 

(On the evening of Dec. 4, 1914, I 
boarded the through train at Portland,* 

Oregon, for Greensboro, N. C, via 
San Francisco and Los Angeles, Cal., 
arriving at the latter place on Monday 
following at 7 :30 a. m., and there tak- 
ag a local to Ontario, Cal., a distance 
,f 40 miles, where I stopped until Fri- 
day morning at 9:20 o'clock, visiting 
among our people in Ontario, Upland 
and Claremont, holding meetings at 
Brother Yandal Bogarts in Ontario. 

I reached Greensboro, N. C, on the 
morning of the 15th, where I changed 
cars for Siler City, arriving there at 2 
o'clock in the afternoon of the same 
day. Here I was met by Ulissis, sec- 
ond son of Brother H. W. Johnson, of 
near Brush Creek with whom I had 
been in correspondence for some two 
or three years and conveyed to his hos- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



pitable home where I met Brother 
Johnson and his family for the first 
time in life. 

I suppose, in the first place Brother 
Gold, in order to introduce myself to 
your readers, it will be necessary for 
me to say I was born in Randolph Co., 
N. C, 57 years ago Oct. 28th last, near 
the place called Moffitt. My grand- 
father's name was Aaron Moffit, my 
grand-mother's was Finity Moffit, my 
father's was Middleton Moffit and my 
mother's maiden name was Craven, her 
given name being Mildred (or Millie) 
as she was called. She was the daugh- 
ter of Thompson Craven. 

Both my grand-fathers were deacons 
in the Primitive Baptist church. My 
grand-father's. ( Moffitt s; membership 
was with the old Brush Creek church. 
My grand-father Craven's membership 
was with Mt. Tabor church, both 
churches being in Randolph county. 
My mother's membership was also with 
old Brush Creek. 

I have been thus explicit that my rel- 
atives who are yet living in your coun- 
try, many of whom I met, may readily 
see who 1 am. Brother Johnson is the 
present clerk of old Brush Creek 
church. 1 visited around several days 
in that neighborhood holding meetings 
at old Brush Creek several times. 1 vis- 
ited grand- father Moffit 's old place — 
was in the house where my father was 
born and where grand-father and 
grand-mother both died. I also visited 
their graves. They are buried in old 
Brush Creek cemetery naer where the 
old meeting house once stood which 
was built in 1802. They have since 
built a new house on the same grounds 
near where the old one stood. 

I visited the place where mother wa? 
baptized, also where she was born, and 
drank from the spring near where she 
first felt her sins forgiven. 

| have hear4 her relate her exper- 



ience years ago; how that when she 
was but a girl, seventeen years old, she 
felt herself convicted of sin and went 
about mourning God's love to know, 
and finally one evening, thinking she 
could not live another day, she took 
the bucket and started for the spring, 
never expecting to return to the house 
alive. And when she reached the 
spring she sat the bucket down and 
crept into a thicket of underbrush, 
thinking to get down on her knees once 
more, to try to beg God for mercy. But 
instead of getting down on her knees 
she fell on her face and although she 
did not know how long she lay there, 
the next thing she knew she was on her 
feet clapping her hands and praising 
God, and that the very leaves on the 
trees seemed to be praising their 
Maker. 

While I stood there gazing on the 
scene of long ago 1 could but wonder 
if it was possible that a covenant 
keeping God had followed as it were 
the meanderings of a poor lump- of 
clay — her off-spring — for lo these many 
years and even put it in my poor heart 
to care to go back there, a distance of 
over four thousand miles, for the pur- 
pose of viewing these very scenes. Be 
that as it may, it has been my longing 
desire for years to do so, and while 
there I could but thank the God oi 
Israel for so great a privilege. 

"While there, in company with Bro. 
Johnson, we visited the church called 
Big Meadows, the home church of Bro. 
Johnson's mother, where I tried to 
talk twice in the name of the God of 
Israel. From here we went to Gain's 
Grove where we met with a goodly 
number of our people and had a very 
good meeting both Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

After spending considerable time in 
this part of the State I bade farewell 
to Brother Johnson's family, whom { 



2% 



2FI#N'8 LANDMARK. 



had learned to love as my own people, 

and Brother Johnson and 1 started for 
High Point to attend a Union meeting 
held with the Abbott's Creek church. 
Here I met several preachers, among 
them being that dear old father in 
Israel, Eld. P. W. Williard, who is the 
Moderator of the Abbots Creek Asso- 
ciation, also Moderator and pastor of 
the church and Union meeting held 
there. Here we had a lovely meeting 
and one long to be remembered. 
Among the preachers I met here were 
Elders 0. A. Davis, W. C. Jones, Sam- 
uel McMillan and W. A. Gorley ; licen- 
tiate Wm. P. Matthews, and heard 
most of them preach. 

1 next visited the church at Dan- 
ville, Va., and held meetings twice in 
the church building and once in a Mr. 
Joe Hilliard's house in Schoollield, a 
suburb of Danville. 1 here met four 
ordained ministers and two licentiates, 
to-wit: Elders Thos. N. Walton, J. B. 
Dalles, J. F. Spangler and T. A. Wal- 
ker; licentiates, Brother Samuel Coger 
and Brother James Ayers. Elder 
Spangler is their pastor. 

From here we returned to Burling- 
ton, N. C, where we were met at the 
depot by that venerable servant of 
the Lord, Elder W. C. Jones, and con- 
veyed to his hospitable home and eared 
for as none but a wayworn pilgrim 
could appreciate. Here Brother John- 
son bade us goodbye and returned to 
his home. I hated to see him go as I 
had become so attached to him. He 
seemed like a brother I had always 
known. 

I remained here several days, hold- 
ing meetings several times in and 
around Burlijugton, visiting the /col- 
ored church here and hearing their 
pastor, Elder Whitted, preach. From 
here, in company with Elder Jones, I 
went to Durham, N. C, where we held 
Services Wednesday night potyrr to 



Itoxboro Thursday night. On Friday 
I returned to Durham and met with 
the church on Saturday and Sunday, 
mere 1 met that venerable old servant 
of the Lord, Elder P. D. Gold, editor 
of Zion's Landmark, and heard him 
preach Sunday evening at 7 -MO 
o'clock. 

While here arrangements was made 
to hold service at 3:30 o'clock in the 
afternoon at the colored Primitive 
Baptist church where it was my privi- 
lege to sit and listen to some of the 
best singing it has been my lot to lis- 
ten to in all my life. Surely God has 
tuned their hearts as well as their ton- 
gues and voices to sing those grand 
old songs it had been my happy priv- 
ilege to hear my dear sainted father 
and mother sing long years ago. 

From here I returned to Burling- 
ton, again meeting with those good 
people, and holding service at their 
place of meeting twice, also at the 
home of a Mr. R. T. Hensley whose 
mother, a member, was sick and could 
not go out to meeting. The following 
Saturday morning, the last day of 
February, I bade these good people 
goodbye, possibly to nevermore meet 
them on this side the cold river of 
death, and went to Greensboro to fill 
an appointment for the 4th Sunday. 
Here I was met at the depot by that 
dear old Brother, J. W. Hutchens, and 
conveyed to the home of his son-in-law 
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Neal, with 
whom he is now making his home, hav- 
ing recently buried his wife who was 
also a member of the church. 

From here I started for California, 
arriving at Ontario in time to meet 
with the Little Flock church which 
meeting was held at the home of 
Brother and Sister Yandle Bogart 
above mentioned. I visited with the 
brethren here and at Claremont and 
Upland until Saturday when I went to 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



297 



Riverside where 1 attended the Little 
Mock church the 3rd Sunday. They 
hold their regular services here every 
•3rd Sunday in each month at Oth and 
Park streets, and in Ontario, at Clare- 
mont and Upland alternately on the 
lirst Sunday in each month. Brother 
P. Spiers, of Claremont is their beloved 
clerk. 

i here had the privilege of baptizing 
three members in fellowship with Lit- 
tle Flock church. There were three 
awaiting baptism and two joined the 
day 1 was there, but two that were 
awaiting baptism failed to get to the 
meeting. They have no regular pas- 
tor. 

From there I went to Ocean Park 
where 1 attended the Liberty church of 
Los Angeles that hold meetings at 
Ocean Park every fourth Sunday at 
the home of Brother and Sister Daw- 
son, 644 Ashland Ave., and at 43d and 
Moneta Ave., in Los Angeles every 
lirst and third Sunday at 11 o'clock. 
Elder W. T. Henderson is their pastor. 
One joined at Ocean Park last Sunday 
and will be baptized next Sunday. 1 
expect, the Lord willing, to attend the 
church in Los Angeles next Sunday 
after which I will start for Oregon 
City and reach there in time to att< ad 
their 4th Sunday meeting at which 
place I am their unworthy pastor. 

I would like to say many things 
about the kindness and hospitality 1 
met with on this, to me, very pleasur- 
able trip, but time and space forbid ; 
so in a word 1 desire to thank all the 
good brethren, sisters and friends for 
(heir kind and hospitable treatment 
and for the many words of cheer and 
comfort to one who feels to De less 
than the least in my Father's house 
and 1 assure you it will ever De as 
"Apples of gold, in pictures of sil- 
ver," and if we are never to meet again 
on earth may it be our happy lot to 
meet in blessed eternity where part- 



ing will be no more and where the in- 
habitants thereof will never more 
again say "I am sick," is the prayers 
of your little brother in hope, 

S. B. MOFFIT'L 
P. S. My correspondence will please 
address me at Newberg, Oregon. 

S. B. M. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Brother Cold: — I feel unworthy 
to address you thus. 

As 1 am a year behind on my sub- 
scription for the Landmark 1 am en- 
closing what is now due. 1 would have 
been glad to pay in advance but that 
was impossible. 

For some time, I have had a mind 
to write and tell yon, what 1 hope has 
been the dealings of the Lord with 
me, that my children might read, in 
after years, -some of the sorrows and 
conllicts I have undergone for my sins, 
but feeling my weakness and ignor- 
ance to such an extent, 1 shrink from 
the task. When a small child, 1 had 
serious thoughts about death and 
What would be my doom after death, 
and at times these fears would wear 
away, and then I would enjoy the 
pleasures of the world as well as any 
one, I reckon. In the year 1850 my 
health gave way and I saw myself a 
lost and ruined sinner before a just- 
Cod and felt that without his mercy T 
was eternally lost. For several weeks 
T remained in this condition, till one 
morning these words came with force 
to my mind, "And can T yet delay my 
little all to give." T did not know 
what they meant, and looked for them 
some time, hoping to derive some com- 
fort from them, but when T did find 
them they read thus : 

"And can T yet delay mv little all to 
to give, 



2<>8 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



To tear my soul from earth away for 
Jesus to receive." 

And it seemed to add two-fold more 
to my troubled mind, and it seemed 
that I must die and that torment would 
be my portion. 1 do not remember how 
long 1 was in this condition, but I know 
it was several weeks. 

One morning 1 was so troubled that 
I scarcely knew what 1 was doing, 
and the very breathing of my soul was 
"Lord have mercy on me, a lost and 
ruined sinner," until 1 happened to 
notice the time of day, and found that 
dinner should have been nearly done 
and the fire had gone out. 

While trying to renew the lire and 
wondering what excuse 1 could render, 
should my husband come in for early 
dinner, which he often did. for 1 did 
not want him to know the condition I 
was in, these words, witli much force, 
came to my mind, 

"Earth lias no sorrow that heaven 
can't cure." 

sented to me, that I looked around to 
see where they came from, but could 
see no one. 

At that time I did not claim this as 
a hope, but just continued graspting 
at the shadow and missing the sub- 
stance. Some time after this, T dream- 
ed of going into a pool of water to be 
baptized, and across the pool was a 
line stretched, and when T leaned 
back against it I found it to be the 
sweetest resting place I was ever in. 

I feel to say with the poet, 

"It was grace that brought me safe 

thus far 
And grace will lead me home." 

T am your little sister T hope, but 
feel to be the least of the least. 

AGATHA HICKS. 
Prospect Hill, N. C, 



TEN DON'TS FOR YOUNG BAP- 
TIST PREACHERS. 

1. Don't introduce your discourse 
with apologies. 

2. Don't read a text and then ne- 
glei t (o tell the people what it means. 

:S. Don't stop preaching to take a 
drink of water, even if it is the habit 
of some older preachers. 

4. Don't exert any more physical 
force in preaching than is necessary to 
express your thoughts to your hearers. 
It is the lightning that kills. Thund- 
ering only annoys. 

5. Don't say much about yourself. 
Say nothing about your family while 
preaching. 

C). Don't try to sway your congre- 
gation by emotion. One ounce of truth 
is worth a ton of emotion. 

7. Don't boast of your ignorance. 
It is not a virtue, and you could not 
hide it if you were to try. 

8. Don't ride a hobby: for the peo- 
ple will soon tire of it and you. 

9. Don't say things to amuse your 
eouprrecration. lest they forget the 
solemnity of the word of truth. 

10. Don't seek your own glory, but 
the jxlory of him who hath called you 
out of darkness into his marvelous 
light. 

W. N. THARP. 



VTTCA\ T S ON ZACCTIEUS. 

Dear Brother Eugene: — I feel in- 
clined to give you my views of Zacch- 
eus, as you requested. I hope the 
Lord will bless me with understand- 
ing that I may bring out something 
to your comfort and edification. We 
notice this man was a chief of the 
publicans and rich. The publicans are 
classed as dishonorable and sinners. 

Paul said: "This is a faithful say- 
ing, etc., Jesus Christ came into the 



ZIONV LANDMARK. 



299 



world to save sinners of whom I am 
chief." He puts himself chief. Not 
that he was really any worse than 
others,! but he felt that way. And I 
feel that this comes home to us all af- 
ter we have seen ourselves as we are. 
lie (Zaccheus) was rich. This is a type 
of self righteousness. We have plenty 
of that before we see Jesus. But he 
sought to see Jesus who he was. (No- 
tice bow it reads.) Paul says, Lord, 
who art thou? If 1 call a person by 
their name, why should I then ask 
who he was? But lie was not acquaint- 
ed. 

He had never traveled this way be- 
fore. The blind is being led by a way 
they know not, Hence he seeks Jesus 
to see Him, but lie could not for the 
press. (Naturally this means the peo- 
ple) lint spiritually, the weight of 
sin and condemnation that presses us 
down we cannot. Then, too, he is 
little of stature. Ts not that your ex- 
perience. Surely it is, for how little 
we felt while under the curse of the 
law. Could not extricate ourselves— 
likc'Lazarus when the Lord called us, 
we came forth bound hand and foot— 
wo -could not loose ourselves — we have 
sinned and come short of the glory of 
God. So by the law* we are bound 
hand and foot— dead in trespasses and 
in sin. And the flaming sword and 
eherubims turn every way to keep the 
Tree of life — we cannot reach forth 
our hand, as the world says we can, 
and lake hold of Christ. Zaccheus is 
found trying, for he runs ahead of 
Jesus and climbed a sycamore tree. 
Jesns says: "T am the door, and, if 
any man climb up some other way, the 
same is a thief and a robber." This is 
some other way. lie is trying his own 
strength — his own works for justifica- 
tion. Was that allowed to stand'? No. 
When Jesns comes to whore be w>» 
he called him by his own name, as He 



always does, and says "make haste" 
and come down. And he like Kebecca, 
when sue saw Isaac, she lighteth on 
the camels and runs to meet him. At 
liis eomand, we do just what lie says. 
"'He received Him joyfully." Was it 
not a time of rejoicing with us when 
we beheld Jesns as our Saviour — who 
was our "guest" at our "house?" 
Who was the One altogether lovely 
and the chiefest among ten thousand. 
The sycamore tree. It is a tree tn 
bears no fruit. It is a white tree, and 
I would think, hard to climb, (if it is 
the same kind we have.) That shows 
up our works as looking good (white) 
to us. but has no fruit, They must 
fall to the ground. They are as filthy 
rags before Him. .Just as sure as we 
feel that we are sinners and begin to 
do as did Zaccheus, so sure will Jesus 
pass that way. "For lie was to pass 
thai way." And Jesus says: "today is 
salvation come to this house." 

Salvation comes to him — that house 
means him. As to the thief, this day 
shall thou be with me in paradise. 

There was a manifestation of His 
love to Zaccheus, and he says the half 
of my goods 1 give to the poor — giving 
glory and honor to whom it belongs. 

For unto Him belongs all the glory 
and honor 1'or. ver and ever. So may 
His name have all the praise. 

I have tried to <rive you some of my 
thoughts on this subject. It has been 
following me ever since I received 
your letter. I hope what I have writ- 
ten is of the Lord and may be to your 
comfort. 

T tried to speak last 3rd Saturday 
from Tsh. 1 :19- 20. T enjoyed it, One 
young man followed me out to the 
buggy and burst into tears and told 
me T had told his feelings and had 
comforted him. T felt glad that I had 
made the attempt, 

Write soon. ; 



300 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Your urother, 
T. A. STANP1EELD. 
M elver, N. C. 



UNION MEETING. - 

The Cedar Island Union will be 
held with the church at North River, 
Friday, Saturday and 5th Sunday in 
May. 

JNO. P. TINGLE. 



Associations. 

ASSOCIATION. 

The next session of the Mayo Assoc- 
iation wil be held with the church at 
Kussell Creek Saturday, third Sun- 
day and Monday of May, 1915, seven 
miles from Critz R. R. Station. 

J. WALTER 1IUTCHENS, 

Church Clerk. 



ASSOCIATION. 

The next session of the Silver Creek 
Assoeiat ion will be held with Globe 
ehurck, Caldwell County, N. C, com- 
mencing on Friday before the 3rd Sun- 
day in September, 1915. We invite all 
true and orderly Baptists to visit us. 



Appointments 

ELDER J. E. ADAMS. 

Tiny Oak— Sat. and 4th Sunday. 

East Lake— Tuesday night and 
Wednesday. 

Flatty Creek— Saturday and 1st 
Sunday in June. 

Bethlehem— Saturday and 2nd Sun- 
day in June. 

Concord— Monday and Tuesday. 



Send us your Job Work. 

P. D. G. 



ZION'S LANDMARK 



"Remove not the ancient landmark 
which thy fathers have set." 



P. D. GOLD, Wilson, N. C. 

P. G. LESTER, Floyd, Va. 



VIOL. XLVIII. NUMBER 13 



Entered at the postollioe at Wilson as 
second class matter. 



WILSON, N. C, MAY 15, 1915. 



EDITORIAL 

SAUL SEEKING HELP OF A 
WITCH. 

Brother J. S. Willis requests my 
view of 1st Samuel 28:5-16. 

Among the great number of strange 
occurrences recorded in the bible is 
the one related in the report of Saul 
seeking information of the witch of 
Endor. 

If one reads and searches the scrip- 
ture with a true desire for instruction 
this is great favor, because the things 
recorded in the bible are true in the 
sense that they are a faithful reporl 
of the things recorded. Jesus said, 
search the scriptures, for in them ye 
think ye have eternal life; and they 
are they that testify of me. While the 
scriptures testify of Jesus they are a 
faithful testifying of Him who is 
eternal life. To believe the report of 
the prophets is of great worth, because 
it argues that such are nobler than 
such as rely on man for guidance. 



2I*N'S LANDMARK. 



301 



Saul was a prominent character iu 
very important unies. israei was seek- 
ing nelp at uie wrong quarter, i'iiey 
desire a king like ilie nations 01 earth. 
Tney had in heart rejected Uod as their 
Kmg. itow sad it is to depart from 
the living (Jod. The traits of Saul 
were such as to suit and please such as 
sou-lit help of what looks well, and is 
pleasing, to the flesh, and attracts the 
attention of those that look to the nat- 
ural, outward man, or judge alter the 
flesh. Israel desired a lung that would 
go out before them; and could fight 
I heir battles for them. Saul seemed 
to answer iliis demand. He was high- 
er than any of the people from his 
shoulders and upward. This appeals 
to people who look at the outwaid man 
as a possession of strength for lighting 
battles, and being a leader. This the 
people wanted. It was not the right 
desire, yei it was like their natural de- 

YVIieii Israel chooses according t) 
fleshly principles it is a carnal choice, 
Which never ends well-. To judge • c- 
eording to outward appearance 's to 
judge after the flesh ; while the tn e 
Strength is a hidden one. But this gift 
of Saul to the people was in keepjig 
wifli their carnal desire. It answered 
<o the appearance of the first covenant 
that made a fair show in the outward 
appearance, hut there was in it the 
rashness of not trusting in the Lord, 
and there the fatal harrier to success 
of not laying hold of the hope set forth 
in the gospel, for the more demand 
is made on that which is defective the 
greater will he the failure when it is 
put to the test of truth. Saul is not 
ahle to rule in the kingdom of Israel. 
This kingdom not. only requires wis- 
dom from heaven to guide, hut also the 
mortification of such corrupt desires 
and passion of envy, revenge and mal- 
ice such as Saul displayed. He seem- 



ed to run well lor awnile, until another 
appeared on uie arena more worthy be- 
cause w iser, more prudent, and a more 
liumble, lovely, braver man in the 
prudential management of the affairs 
of the kingdom of Israel, The more 
Saul is tried and weighed the more he 
is iound wan ling. The greater the de- 
mand lor the true wisdom the charac- 
ter ami liiness of David is brought 
more to view. If a giant is to be slain 
thai none bul David can meet and slay, 
David is sent into the kingdom in the 
peculiar manner that proves that the 
hand of God furnishes him. 

AVhen a climax is approaching, and 
Saul's failure is apparent, there is a 
showing forth of the hand of (Jod in 
the preparation of David for the great- 
est emergency. Saul's case is rapidly 
waxing more desperate. When Samuel 
is dead and the Philistines, who are 
Saul's enemies are invading Israel, and 
God no longer answers Saul, he dis- 
guises himself to deceive, and goes to a 
witch at Endor to consult her about 
what he must do. In zeal he had put 
away witches, yet now since his 
troubles ar^ so sore on him he goes 
back on what he had done before. Thus 
lie renounces his own work, showing 
that his reformations are shallow, and 
that (he true principles that withstand 
temptation, and that endure in the fur- 
nace, and shine the more brightly as 
fiie furnace is heated hotter arc want- 
ing in Saul. Every man's work must 
be tried, of what sort it is. If it en- 
dures, the severer the test the greater 
the deliverance, so that it is found un- 
to praise and honor at the appearing 
of the true judge of all the earth. 

David and Saul display these char- 
acters. They are enacted in those two- 
Kings in Israel, each anointed by the 
same wonderful prophet, Samuel. Saul 
representing the first covenant that 
made nothing perfect, because it was 



MON'S LANDMARK. 



operating m the uesn, ur was weak 

to tnunipn Liirougii tiie operation ox 
i iic wisdom of tne irue Spirit. 

F. D. G. 



BY GKACE AFE YE SAVED. 

Then can it be by grace that any 
are lust. Dues grace ever fail to save 
any that it is applied to '2 if by the 
grace ui God i am what i am. Grace 
is the crowning glory of the mingling 
of all the holy attributes of the God- 
head ; where righteuusness and peace 
meet, where mercy and truth dwell 
together, where every trait of power 
mingled with compassiou, and wisdom 
dwells with prudence, and glory 
crowns the mercy seat. 
Then is there any failure in grace? 
Whatever there was in Paul that was 
commendable was by grace. Were his 
gifts by his procuring? If Saul had 
been suffered to pursue the course he 
had planned for himself it would all 
have been different from what it actu- 
ally was. For he thought to do many 
things contrary to the name of Jesus 
of Nazareth, and was doing those 
things with all the earnestness and 
zeal of his power, when lie was arrest- 
ed and turned about by the heavenly 
vision, io which he said he Avas not 
disobedient. Then all lie did after 
that was dictated by the grace of God; 
so that he said truly or wrote that, 
"By the grace of God I am what I 
am." 

Now is grace the cause of any sin- 
ning or wrong doing of any man? 
Grace is the only antidote for sin. 
Nothing but grace can overcome sin. 
Where sin abounded grace did much 
more abound: that as sin reigned un- 
to death, even so might grace reign 



tnrougn righteous. '.ess unio eternal 
nxe uy oesuj Gniust our r.ord. uoes 
grace ever cause any une to du Wrong, 
or m sni; 

uy man came sin, and by sm came 
death ; so tnat cieatii nam passed up- 
on all because all nave sinned. 

Men may argue, and some do argue 
thai God is ah unjust judge. Hut tlie 
declaration 01 scripture is, ".Let God 
be true ami > very man a liar.'.' But 
they say who Ham resisted his will? 
Then if none have resisted or defeated 
his will, why does he mid fault '! The 
fault is in man. Grace is in no sense 
the cause of man's condemnation. Jus- 
tice says, God cannot do wrong. 

When men are brought to the bar 
of justice they always plead guilty 
and feel and say that God cannot do 
wrong — that his righteous law ap- 
proves the righteousness of his judg- 
ment, and the wisdom of his proced- 
ure. Shame and confusion of face be- 
long unto man, or to men, or to na- 
tions, and to the entire race of man- 
kind: while God's throne is pure and 
holy, and that grace only can reach 
and save the sinner. 

Every motive and reason operating, 
every consideration vindicates the 
goodness and the mercy of God, and 
removes the sin, and makes an end of 
the rebellion that exists in the heart, 
and is manifested in the conduct of 
the sinner, until • where sin abounded 
grace .lid much more abound, so that it 
removes, casts out and expels the de- 
sire to commit sin. Then the nature, 
life, character and the conduct of the 
sinner becomes hateful to himself, and 
he abhors himself, and repents in dust 
and ashes. In proportion as grace 
reigns sin is made an end of. There is 
no violence done to man's will. It is 
exposed, shown to be hateful, and 
enmity against the goodness, holiness, 
mercy, power and grace of God. Noth- 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



ing appears so hateful to God's charac- 
ter as sin, so that the sinner taught oi' 
God is so fully in spirit changed, 
turned about, that he is altogether on 
the Lord's side, and sincerely and 
earnestly desires that the Lord's will 
shall be done. Before 1 1ns' the sinner 
was an enemy of God, and held God's 
judgments and ways as hard, unjust, 
unreasonable, (and* had no love for 
them) but now and henceforth he is on 
the Lord's side, and hates his own 
ways, yea his own life, and feels that 
nothing but the grace of God saves 
him. 

P. D. G. 



WHAT WORLD? 

Sister Marida J. Tillman requests my 
view of John 3 :17. 

"For God sent not his Son into the 
world to condemn the world; but that 
the world through him might be 
saved." 

The beloved disciple dwells on the 
theme near to him — love. This same 
John, as strongly condemns sin as 
anv — as much shows the guilty help- 
lessness of man as anv. as much shows 
the blessed merev of God in saving 
without any failure all that come to 
God bv the Lord Jesus. 

In bi's conversation with Nieodemus 
lie announces such necessity of the 
birth from heaven that none can see 
this kingdom without that birth from 
above. The innbilitv of Nieod^mus to 
understand it does *inf "+ all h>ssen the 
neeessitv of that hlc-^rd birth, nor does 
the inabili+v of v-u to proenre it ren- 
der it at all uncertain that all that are 
Chosen unto this new birth shall ob- 
tain thereunto. Also Jesus tells him it 
is not at all as the birth of the earth 
or of woman. Jesus speaks a truth 
established in the heavens, "We speak 
that we do know, and testify that we 



have seen ; and ye receive not our wit- 
ness. If i have told you oi* earthly 
things, and ye believe not, how shall 
ye believe if 1 tell you of heavenly 
things.' And no man hath ascended 
up to heaven, but he that came down 
from heaven, even the Son of man 
which is in heaven." How then can 
any receive this birth except through 
Jesus, for he only came down from 
heaven who was then in heaven. As 
many as received Jesus were born not 
of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, 
but bom of God. Such received power 
to become the sons of God. Then all 
divine knowledge — all salvation comes 
through Jesus Christ, the lamb of God 
that taketh away the sin of the world. 
A reference is also made to Moses. For 
as Moses lifted up the serpent in the 
wilderness, even so must the Son of 
man be lifted up: that, whosoever be- 
believeth in him should not perish, but 
have eternal life. Moses lifted the 
serpent in the camp where there were 
bitten ones perishing. Whosoever that 
was bitten that looked upon or be- 
held the serpent that Moses made of 
brass lived. The merit is all in Jesus 
therefore Jesus must be beheld, own- 
ed, trusted in. There is none other 
name under heaven given among men 
wherehv we must be saved. For God 
so loved the world that he gave his on- 
lv begotten Son. that whosoever be- 
lieveth in him should not perish, but 
have everlasting life. Two things are 
named. He shall not perish, but shall 
have everlasting life. Because God 
did not send Jesus into the world to 
condemn the world, but that the world 
might be saved. He that believeth not 
is condemned already, and this is the 
condemnation, that men loved dark- 
ness rather than light, because their 
deeds were evil. 

While men arc loving evil they are 
not desiring the love of the truth. But 



304 



they loved darkness rather than light. 

Every one that loveth . the truth 
conieth to the light that it might be 
manifest that his deeds are wrought in 
God. 

The serpent that Moses made of brass 
looked like the fiery serpents that 
hit (lie Israelites, hut it did not bite 
them, nor was there any death, nor 
poison in it, but it was full of remedy 
— of healing to every one that was bit- 
ten by the fiery serpent, that beheld 
the serpent of brass made by Moses, 
and lifted in the camp. 

Whosoever believes in Jesus or be- 
lieves that Jesus is the Son of God is 
saved. 

Jesus did not come into the world 
to condemn the world. Such is the 
fulness of his salvation that every one 
that believeth hath everlasting life, 
and shall be saved; but he that be- 
lieveth not is condemned, and this is 
the condemnation that light is come 
into the world and men loved darkness 
rather than light because their deeds 
were evil. For every one that doeth 
evil hateth the light, neither cometh to 
the light, lest his deeds should be re- 
proved. But he that doeth truth com- 
eth to the light, that his deeds may 
he manifest, that they are wrought in 
God. 

Such is the love of God that he sent 
his only begotten Son into the world — 
not to condemn the world — but that 
the world through him might be saved. 

Then there is no eloak nor excuse 
that such as believe not have for their 
unbelief. It is the love of sin and 
death that prevents men from com- 
ing to Jesus Christ; and so great is 
that love of sin and death that noth- 
ing but the grace of God can draw 
sinners to Jesus Christ. 

P. D. G. 



Send us your Job Worlr. 



JESUS. 

"And she shall bring forth a son, 
and thou shalt call Life name jesus. 
for he shall save his n jople from their 
«r.s. f1 Matt 1:21. 

i"..jhold, a virgin shall he with child, 
am; shall bring fore- a sod, and th.y 
shall call his name Emmanuel, which 
being interpreted is, God with us. 
Ifatre is no greater wonder than this. 
It is an impossibility in nature, or ac- 
cording to nature, for a virgin to con- 
ceive and bring forth a son. This pro- 
duction of the Holy Ghost is the mar- 
vel of the ages. Its effects are the 
greatest miracle, and in harmony with 
his conception, his birth and the re- 
sults of this birth. 

1st. He is not of the earth earthy: 
but is the Lord from heaven. The 
interpretation of his name is God with 
us. This is what Emmanuel means. If 
God be with us he is for us, and if He 
is for us who can be against us? Jesus 
means Saviour. His name shall be 
called Jesus, for or because he shall 
save his people from their sins. Then 
Jesus had a people, owned a people be- 
fore he savd them, and he saved them 
because they wen; and are his people, 
lie did not make them sinners, nor 
cause them to be sinners, but he saved 
them from their sins. , 

2nd. Nor did Jesus save his people 
through (be aid, help or influence of 
any others. This is the Lord's work, 
and it is marvelous in our eyes. No 
man rendered any part of the help. 
There was no part of the man that did 
not need the saving. There is no part 
of man that is not a sinner. 

3rd. A body was prepared for the 
Son of God. Tn this he comes or ap- 
pears in the likeness of men. Tn this 
character of the Son of man he comes 
to n* took not on him the nature of 
angels, but the seed of Abraham. 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



;jor, 



4th. Not only was he t'ouud in fash- 
ion as a man, but Odd laid on him the 
iniquity or mus of his people, for he 
bare their sins in his own body on the 
tree, so that he was smitten for the 
transgression of his people, in all 
their affliction lie was afflicted, aua 
by his stripes they are healed. 

God said of him, Behold, my servant 
whom i uphold: mine eleet in whom 
my sonl delighteth: 1 brave put my 
Spirit upon him: he shall bring forth 
judgment to the Gentiles. Then he 
has a people among the Gentiles, there- 
fore in his name shall the gentiles 
I rust. When God makes the soul of 
Jesus an ottering for sin he shall see 
bis seed, he shall prolong his days, 
and the pleasure of the Lord shall 
prosper in his hand. 

5thi .Jesus gave himself for the sins 
of his people. He was holy in soul, 
body and spirit. He knew no sin. 
There was no guile found in his ton- 
gue. This body was prepared for that 
sacrifice. He laid down his life, his 
entire life, for the sins of his people. 
He had power to lay it down, and pow- 
er to take it again. This command- 
ment he received of his Father. No 
man took it from him. It was his de 
light to do his Father's will. 

ffth. Jesus is the Priest of the Most 
High God, and one throne is the dwel- 
ling place of the Father and the Son. 
As the priest he offers himself without 
spol to God, and obtains eternal re- 
demption for his people. Of his fulness 
they all receive. Not only the forgive- 
ness of sins through his blood is given 
them: but also justification unto etern- 
al life, for he was delivered for their 
offences and also he arose from the 
(had for their justification, and as- 
cended to heaven at the right hand of 
God a prince and a Saviour, and be- 
cause he lives they also live. _He is 
the head and the church, his people 



are the body. If the dead rise not then 

is Christ not risen. 

The incontestible proof of his resur- 
rection from the dead is established 
>eyond question to and in the faith of 
hose bom of (Jod. Jesus appeared by 
aany infallible proofs. His disciples 
aw him, heard him speak, and he ate 
nth them. He said handle me and see 
hat it is 1 myself, and not a spirit, 
or a spirit hath not flesh and bones as 

, e see me have. 

No part of him eame from the dust, 

No part of him went to the dust, While 

Li the grave he saw up corruption. 

The man was crucified. The same man 

rose from the dead on the third day. 

He was not changed into 

V.hen his disciples saw 



)d In 



app; 



el, 



ch 



of 



er man. 
go into 
('in in 
id, Ye 



; which 
n shall 
have 



men 

up into he 
is taken u 
so come i 
seen him ; 

Literally, actually the entire man 
Chnst Jesus, who was crucified and 
buried, arose from the dead, and as- 
eended to heaven. He is the same yes- 
terday, to-day and forever. Because 

ie lives his people shall live also. The 
•esurrection of the dead, the changing 

f their vile bodies, and fashioning 

hem like unto his glorious body is the 

onsummation of salvation. 

P. D. G. 



O&ttuarLes. 



MRS. REBECCA E. GARNER,. 

Mrs. Garner was the daughter of 
Elijah and Mary Jane Garner of New- 
port, Carteret County, N. C. She was. 



:;<i6 



ZION'8 LANDMARK. 



born Oct. 1st, 1858, and departed this 
lite August IS, 1913, making her stay 
on earth o4 years, ten months and sev- 
enteen days. She was lirst married to 
John 14. Mann, and to them was born 
one ehild. 

We do not know the date of Mr. 
Mann's death. Mrs. Mann was mar- 
ried to H. N. Garner on April 27, 1878. 
To this union were born six children, 
three sons and three daughters. 

She was united with the Primitive 
Baptist church at Newport and was 
baptized by Elder W. W. Brinson. 

She attended services regularly un- 
less prevented by sickness, and loved 
to have the brethren visit her and did 
what she could to make it pleasant 
for them. She suffered much with in- 
digestion, and also with smothering 
spells. About two weeks before she 
died, she and another sister were on 
their way to visit a neighbor when 
she was taken with a smothering spell 
and fell to the ground. A doctor soon 
relieved her to the extent that she 
could be carried home on a bed. She 
was soon able to be up most of the 
time. On her last evening here, she 
seemed as well as usual, till about bed 
time she was attacked with smother- 
ing, and all that relatives, doctor and 
friends could do, failed to relieve her, 
for the Father called, "Child come 
home. ' ' 

She leaves an afflicted husband who 
feels deeply his loss, but Jesus only, 
can soothe his sorrows, heal his wounds 
and dry the falling tear. One son, two 
daughters and a step daughter of her 
family, are members of the Primitive 
Baptist church, and we feel that there 
are others of this family who love 
the church. The writer, in his weak- 
ness, tried at the grave, to make some 
comforting remarks to the bereaved 
ones. ''"Tr*! 

Children, follow in your dear moth- 



er 's foot-steps and may God prepare 
you to follow her, for we feel that our 
loss is her heavenly gain. 
AVritten by request. 

Her son-in-law, 

E. F. POLLARD. 
Jacksonville, N. C. 



MRS. MARY E. GURKIN. 

Mrs. Mary E. Gurkin, widow of Eld. 
W. W. Gurkin, of Dardens, N. C, died 
at the home of her son in Plymouth, 
N. C., April 14, 1915, at the age of 64, 
being born June 21, 1850. She was a 
member of the Primitive Baptist 
church of Jamesville, N. C, and her 
funeral was preached by Elder Sylves- 
ter Hassell, of Williamston, N. C. She 
was buried in the family burying 
ground at her residence in the country. 
She is survived by three sons, William 
T. Gurkin, of Dardens, Luther "W. Gur- 
kin, of Plymouth, and John A. Gur- 
kin, of Norfolk, Va., also two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. G. T. Barden, of Norfolk, 
Va., and Mrs. Macon W. Norman, of 
Plymouth, N. 0. 

She left a large number of grand- 
children, relatives and friends to 
mourn her loss, most of whom tender- 
ed gentle tributes of respect in the 
presentation of numerous floral offer- 
ings. She Avas everywhere recognized 
as a mother in Tsrael. In her domes- 
tic life she was tender and indulgent 
to her family, and generously hospita- 
able to her friends. TTer very best 
side was always turned toward her 
hearthstone and there she dispensed 
the richest treasures of her soul. She 
was brought into ber country where 
she was buried, a bride fortv years 
asro- and in the language of one of the 
elderlv ladies of that community we 
find ber best eulogy. The lady said, 
standing over ber grave. "T saw Mary 
brought to this home forty years ago 



HQNH LANDMARK J 



as a bride, and now I see her adorned 
lor the grave, and during ail that time 
me worst word 1 have ever heard 
spoken of her was that she was the 
best woman we ever knew." 

i rieeless eulogy, a glittering diadem 
could not better erown her life work, 
because the laurels were patiently and 
sweetly won. She saw the hand of God 
in every slight favor and in her many 
trials and chastennings she acknowl- 
edged Divine Providence. She dedi- 
cated her life to the cause of truth and 
poured out the libations of a great 
heart in helping all with whom she 
came in contact. 

If there is any virtue or truth in 
these reflections may they be priceless 
and precious to those who knew and 
loved her. Let us learn by her patient 
and righteous example that we live in 
deeds, not in years, in thoughts, not in 
number of breaths, in tenderest feel- 
ings, not in figures on a dial plate. We 
should count time by heart throbs, for 
lie or she lives most who loves most, 
feels the noblest and acts the best. 

Sleep well dear sister, the grave holds 

but thy outward earthly shrine, 
It cannot hold the sacred spark of 

life divine: 
Sleep well where buds and blossoms 

round thee blow, 
The soft fires of sunset will gild thy 

couch below. 

T. E. MeCASKEY. 
2.")17 Oranby Street, Norfolk, Va. 



MRS. C. C. DAVIS. 
The death angel visited the home of 
Mrs. W. E. Farthing, May 4, 1915, and 
claimed her dear mother Mrs. C. C. 
Davis, one of the most worthy charac- 
ters of the Mt. TTermon neighborhood 
near Fall Creek, Va., and cast a dark 
cloud on all the people. 



This lovely lady was sick only four 
days, when Cod in his glory saw lit to 
call her home. We can sincerely say 
she was a good neighbor, a, kind and 
loving mother and her christian con- 
duct couldn't be surpassed. And now 
she's surely gone to her reward which 
is prepared for those with like charac- 
ter, and may God's most holy will be 
done and not ours, and may He re- 
concile her loved ones to His will. 

This lady's maiden name was Cath- 
erine Byles, of North Carolina and was 
born in 1840, and reared in said State 
and when quite young she was married 
to Mr. ('. 0. Davis, of Virginia. 

To this union was born one noble 
daughter, "Louzettia," who was mar- 
ried to Mr. H. E. Farthing in 1010. 
Mr. Davis having died about sixteen 
years ago this lady spent the remain- 
der of her days with her daughter. In 
the fall of 1912 she united with the 
Alt. Arrarat Primitive Baptist church, 
and lived a faithful member until her 
death. 

The burial services were conducted 
in the prove here at our home by her 
pastor, Elder T. N. Walton, and she 
was Laid to rest in our burying ground 
to await the resurrection, in the pres- 
ence of a large crowd of sorrowing 
friends and relatives. 

.May God guide and protect her dear 
child, and grand children to follow in 
the footsteps of the one just gone be- 
fore, and may He fill her vacancy with 
His presence, for she's one that has 
lived such a life that it surely cannot 
he forgotten. 

Written by those who loved her and 
family. 

MARY AND RUTH LOVELACE. 
Witt, Va, 



Union Notices 

The next session of the Black River 



:s08 



ZION'S LANDMARK. 



Union will meet with the church at 
Reedy Prong meeting house, iu John- 
ston Comity, N. C, on Saturday and 
5th Sunday in May, 1915. 

Reedy Prong is about 12 miles from 
Benson Avhere visitors will be met on 
Friday P. M. and conveyed to the 
Union. 

- Elder James H. Johnson is appointed 
to preach the introductory sermon, 
and Elder J. W. Strickland his altern-